Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteve Schalchlin
IN THE NEWS

Steve Schalchlin

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When finally he was strong enough to sit without pillows propping him up, Steve Schalchlin settled in front of the piano. He rested his head against the top of the spinet, his cheek against the polished wood, and he played chords. Long, slow, full chords. "The next morning when I got up, I felt normal for the first time in three years," Schalchlin said. "The music or the vibrations or whatever--it brought me around." Still, he was not well.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When finally he was strong enough to sit without pillows propping him up, Steve Schalchlin settled in front of the piano in his North Hollywood apartment. He rested his head against the top of the spinet, his cheek against the polished wood, and he played chords. Long, slow, full chords. "The next morning when I got up, I felt normal for the first time in three years," Schalchlin said. "The music or the vibrations or whatever--it brought me around." Still, he was not well.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | AL MARTINEZ
The music Steve Schalchlin wrote for "The Last Session" has the haunting quality of a dirge and the lyrics of a folk song. It's a series of tunes about a songwriter with AIDS who, when he finishes a recording session, is going to end his life because he can't stand the pain anymore. But those around him convince the writer, whose name is Gideon, that he's got more music in him, and that the will to live is mightier than the disease that is eroding his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When finally he was strong enough to sit without pillows propping him up, Steve Schalchlin settled in front of the piano. He rested his head against the top of the spinet, his cheek against the polished wood, and he played chords. Long, slow, full chords. "The next morning when I got up, I felt normal for the first time in three years," Schalchlin said. "The music or the vibrations or whatever--it brought me around." Still, he was not well.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When finally he was strong enough to sit without pillows propping him up, Steve Schalchlin settled in front of the piano in his North Hollywood apartment. He rested his head against the top of the spinet, his cheek against the polished wood, and he played chords. Long, slow, full chords. "The next morning when I got up, I felt normal for the first time in three years," Schalchlin said. "The music or the vibrations or whatever--it brought me around." Still, he was not well.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000
"The Making of the Musical 'The Last Session,' " featuring a discussion with the show's composer-lyricist Steve Schalchlin and author-director Jim Brochu, will be presented by Broadway on Sunset on May 22 at 7:30 p.m., at Upstairs at the Coronet Theatre, 368 N. La Cienega Blvd. After workshopping at the Zephyr Theatre in 1996, "The Last Session" went on to critically acclaimed, extended hit runs between 1997 and 1999 in New York, at the Laguna Playhouse and at the Tiffany Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2000
What's happening the next few weeks: * Songwriter Steve Schalchlin, left, performs songs and stories from his L.A. Drama Critics Circle Award-winning show, "Living in the Bonus Round," Wednesday in Campbell Hall at UC Santa Barbara. (805) 893-3535. * The Ensemble Theatre Company presents the West Coast premiere of Barbara Lebow's "Trains," two related one-act plays. Tuesday-Saturday, 8 p.m. Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m. Through May 7. (805) 962-8606.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It takes more than drug cocktails to fight AIDS. Humor, courage, compassion and companionship have also proven to be powerful weapons. For the couple who wrote "The Last Session," music, too, would have to be included on that list. Steve Schalchlin was weak from battling the disease when he found new strength in writing songs about it. His longtime partner, Jim Brochu, urged him on and, in time, saw a way to weave the songs into a story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nik Venet, credited with discovering the Beach Boys for Capitol Records, has died of complications from treatment for Burkitt's lymphoma. He was 61. Venet died Friday at County-USC Medical Center, said Susan Crawford, his partner in the independent Evening Star Records company. Born Nikolas Kostantinos Venetoulis on Dec. 3, 1936, in Baltimore, Venet began his career at 17 as a writer in New York's famed Brill Building pop song factory, where he rented a small office with Bobby Darin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1998
Movies "Psycho," Gus Van Sant's re-creation of the Hitchcock classic, stars Vince Vaughn as motel keeper Norman Bates. With Anne Heche, Julianne Moore, Viggo Mortensen (right) and William H. Macy among others checking in, it opens in general release on Friday. * The English drama "Little Voice" stars Jane Horrocks as a young woman who barely speaks yet in secret can impersonate the singing voices of a wide range of classic pop singers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | AL MARTINEZ
The music Steve Schalchlin wrote for "The Last Session" has the haunting quality of a dirge and the lyrics of a folk song. It's a series of tunes about a songwriter with AIDS who, when he finishes a recording session, is going to end his life because he can't stand the pain anymore. But those around him convince the writer, whose name is Gideon, that he's got more music in him, and that the will to live is mightier than the disease that is eroding his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It takes more than drug cocktails to fight AIDS. Humor, courage, compassion and companionship have also proven to be powerful weapons. For the couple who wrote "The Last Session," music, too, would have to be included on that list. Steve Schalchlin was weak from battling the disease when he found new strength in writing songs about it. His longtime partner, Jim Brochu, urged him on and, in time, saw a way to weave the songs into a story.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Revivals took the lion's share of the honors Monday at the 30th annual Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards ceremony, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. David Chambers' staging of Noel Coward's "Private Lives" at South Coast Repertory took six awards, the most for a single show. A Noise Within, Glendale's classical theater company, won eight honors, the most for a single company, garnering five for Lillian Hellman's "Another Part of the Forest" and three for Sam Shepard's "Buried Child."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|