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Steve Schlein

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OPINION
August 14, 1988
It would be better to substitute the word "responsible" for "slow" to describe the current growth-concerned movement. Some areas of the city will benefit from development while others, having reached growth limits, will not. Responsible growth contemplates an objective quality of life standard to maintain through responsible land use. Slow growth implies slowly increasing development regardless of the consequences. STEVE SCHLEIN Venice
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000
Re "Workers Race to Finish $8-Million Venice Boardwalk Project," Aug. 12: The Venice boardwalk has become a shooting gallery and the public is the target. It is impossible to walk there without enduring a constant demand for your money. There is no break in the commercial frenzy, no place where Ruth Galanter, the city councilperson in charge, allows people to be themselves. On the boardwalk, people count only if they have money to spend. The crowds on the boardwalk are not a sign of good land use. At the beach--a park--business should never be allowed to consume the public like this.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000
Re "Workers Race to Finish $8-Million Venice Boardwalk Project," Aug. 12: The Venice boardwalk has become a shooting gallery and the public is the target. It is impossible to walk there without enduring a constant demand for your money. There is no break in the commercial frenzy, no place where Ruth Galanter, the city councilperson in charge, allows people to be themselves. On the boardwalk, people count only if they have money to spend. The crowds on the boardwalk are not a sign of good land use. At the beach--a park--business should never be allowed to consume the public like this.
NEWS
March 31, 1994
The boardwalk ("Boardwalk Blues," March 3) used to be one of the most interesting neighborhoods in Venice. It was a special place where the public had an opportunity to mingle with an iconoclastic community, where people could be themselves without being judged. This unique setting was then destroyed by Councilwoman Ruth Galanter so that a handful of boardwalk property owners could maximize profits from their land holdings. Residential zones on the boardwalk were rezoned for intense commercial uses; neighborhood housing was converted to stores.
NEWS
April 1, 1990
Councilwoman (Ruth) Galanter's suit against Culver City's Marina Place project is a deplorable example of hypocrisy. To bolster a sagging image, Galanter has chosen to attack a project located in another city. It is a safe target since the suit does not threaten development interests in Galanter's district. There are good reasons to try to stop the Marina Place project. Its traffic will have a catastrophic impact in Venice and elsewhere. But Galanter will pay a heavy price at election time, because she has a radically different standard for development under her direct control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1989
I was a dedicated campaign volunteer for Galanter, and I am a former member of the Board of the Venice Town Council, the key community organization which helped send Galanter to the City Council. The growing revolt against Galanter, which I have joined, stems from her policy promoting indefinite expansion of commercial development in Venice. The current pace of commercial growth spells disaster for our community since Venice is already over-impacted and over-utilized. The crucial issue is: How much more commercial development can we take?
NEWS
September 2, 1990
The Times' article on the automatic approval of a Venice beach mini-mall touched on an unexplained aspect of the city's role in this novel land-use case: Why did the city fail to act on this project? Briefly, the Permit Streamlining Act requires the city to approve or disapprove projects within a specified time. If no decision is made, a project is "deemed approved" as is. In this instance, no decision was made and a maxed-out, high-intensity three-story mall was "deemed approved" on the ocean front without public input, city planning or environmental impact assessment.
NEWS
March 31, 1994
The boardwalk ("Boardwalk Blues," March 3) used to be one of the most interesting neighborhoods in Venice. It was a special place where the public had an opportunity to mingle with an iconoclastic community, where people could be themselves without being judged. This unique setting was then destroyed by Councilwoman Ruth Galanter so that a handful of boardwalk property owners could maximize profits from their land holdings. Residential zones on the boardwalk were rezoned for intense commercial uses; neighborhood housing was converted to stores.
NEWS
December 23, 1990
At the public meeting on the Venice canals rehabilitation project (Times, Dec. 13), an objection was raised to the city's plan to construct a public boat launch facility for the canals and to rezone the canal waterways to "Ocean Submerged Land." Councilwoman Ruth Galanter responded that the purpose of the rezoning is to prohibit any construction on the submerged portion of the canals. This response, which must have reassured the canal residents, was a complete fabrication. On Page 78 of the city's proposed Venice Coastal Land Use Plan it states, in part, that the purpose of the new zone is to provide "for other uses which would benefit the public and the city."
NEWS
November 22, 1992
In my view, newly elected state Assemblywoman Debra Bowen is a developer's representative who masqueraded as an environmentalist in order to get elected. Bowen is a central figure in the promotion of the Channel Gateway development, the largest project ever approved in Venice. I am a former member of the Venice Town Council board and have observed Bowen closely for years . In 1989, Councilwoman Ruth Galanter selected a group of five Venice residents to act as if it were "the community" in discussions with the developer of Channel Gateway, Jerome Snyder.
NEWS
December 13, 1992
How many times do we have to see Steve Schlein's warmed-over diatribes in your letters column (Times, Nov. 22)? Schlein has been writing variations of his letter for several years now--the variation this time is he's included newly elected Assemblywoman Debra Bowen as a co-villain along with City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter. I am compelled to write because Schlein has seen fit to comment on the Coastal Area Support Team (COAST), an organization in which he has never participated and about which he knows nothing.
NEWS
November 22, 1992
In my view, newly elected state Assemblywoman Debra Bowen is a developer's representative who masqueraded as an environmentalist in order to get elected. Bowen is a central figure in the promotion of the Channel Gateway development, the largest project ever approved in Venice. I am a former member of the Venice Town Council board and have observed Bowen closely for years . In 1989, Councilwoman Ruth Galanter selected a group of five Venice residents to act as if it were "the community" in discussions with the developer of Channel Gateway, Jerome Snyder.
NEWS
December 23, 1990
At the public meeting on the Venice canals rehabilitation project (Times, Dec. 13), an objection was raised to the city's plan to construct a public boat launch facility for the canals and to rezone the canal waterways to "Ocean Submerged Land." Councilwoman Ruth Galanter responded that the purpose of the rezoning is to prohibit any construction on the submerged portion of the canals. This response, which must have reassured the canal residents, was a complete fabrication. On Page 78 of the city's proposed Venice Coastal Land Use Plan it states, in part, that the purpose of the new zone is to provide "for other uses which would benefit the public and the city."
NEWS
September 2, 1990
The Times' article on the automatic approval of a Venice beach mini-mall touched on an unexplained aspect of the city's role in this novel land-use case: Why did the city fail to act on this project? Briefly, the Permit Streamlining Act requires the city to approve or disapprove projects within a specified time. If no decision is made, a project is "deemed approved" as is. In this instance, no decision was made and a maxed-out, high-intensity three-story mall was "deemed approved" on the ocean front without public input, city planning or environmental impact assessment.
NEWS
April 1, 1990
Councilwoman (Ruth) Galanter's suit against Culver City's Marina Place project is a deplorable example of hypocrisy. To bolster a sagging image, Galanter has chosen to attack a project located in another city. It is a safe target since the suit does not threaten development interests in Galanter's district. There are good reasons to try to stop the Marina Place project. Its traffic will have a catastrophic impact in Venice and elsewhere. But Galanter will pay a heavy price at election time, because she has a radically different standard for development under her direct control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1989
I was a dedicated campaign volunteer for Galanter, and I am a former member of the Board of the Venice Town Council, the key community organization which helped send Galanter to the City Council. The growing revolt against Galanter, which I have joined, stems from her policy promoting indefinite expansion of commercial development in Venice. The current pace of commercial growth spells disaster for our community since Venice is already over-impacted and over-utilized. The crucial issue is: How much more commercial development can we take?
NEWS
December 13, 1992
How many times do we have to see Steve Schlein's warmed-over diatribes in your letters column (Times, Nov. 22)? Schlein has been writing variations of his letter for several years now--the variation this time is he's included newly elected Assemblywoman Debra Bowen as a co-villain along with City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter. I am compelled to write because Schlein has seen fit to comment on the Coastal Area Support Team (COAST), an organization in which he has never participated and about which he knows nothing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989
In the editorial, The Times stated its support for a bill which allows people to own weapons in part that "are more than adequate . . . to have the fun of killing game animals. . . ." Few people (The Times included, apparently) question the notion that killing animals is fun, but I believe it represents an arrogant and repugnant side of human character. Today most people would be repulsed by the idea of killing human beings for fun, but the Romans and Nazis had no problem with it. Killing for fun requires the greatest insensitivity to life and a callous indifference to suffering.
OPINION
August 14, 1988
It would be better to substitute the word "responsible" for "slow" to describe the current growth-concerned movement. Some areas of the city will benefit from development while others, having reached growth limits, will not. Responsible growth contemplates an objective quality of life standard to maintain through responsible land use. Slow growth implies slowly increasing development regardless of the consequences. STEVE SCHLEIN Venice
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