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Steve Squyres

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NATIONAL
April 28, 2010
NASA is considering a plan to get around limited budgets set in Washington by stretching out missions to bring back samples from Mars, a researcher said Wednesday. It may be possible to break down the complicated and expensive mission into three parts, said Steve Squyres, a Cornell University astronomer who leads the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. "It makes the program more affordable because it strings out the cost over time," Squyres told reporters in a telephone briefing.
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SCIENCE
January 23, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Old rovers can indeed learn new tricks. Rolling into its 10th anniversary on the Red Planet, Opportunity has discovered clay minerals showing that life-friendly water flowed on Mars in the earliest epoch of its history. The findings indicate that Curiosity's groundbreaking discovery last year of clays capable of hosting microbes like those on Earth was no fluke, experts said. “We've basically found strong evidence for clays on both sides of the planet,” said Cornell University planetary scientist Steve Squyres, lead scientist for NASA's Mars Exploration Rover program and coauthor of a report published in Friday's edition of the journal Science.
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SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Amina Khan
NASA's Mars rover Opportunity has scraped away at some of the oldest rock it's examined and found the strongest signs for water it has ever discovered over its 9.5-year mission, scientists for the Mars Exploration Rover project said Friday. The scrappy little rover is now heading down Endeavour Crater's rim to Solander Point, on what is in some ways a brand new mission, officials said. "We consider it 'Sol 1' all over again for Opportunity," said John Callas, the mission's project manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Amina Khan
NASA's Mars rover Opportunity has scraped away at some of the oldest rock it's examined and found the strongest signs for water it has ever discovered over its 9.5-year mission, scientists for the Mars Exploration Rover project said Friday. The scrappy little rover is now heading down Endeavour Crater's rim to Solander Point, on what is in some ways a brand new mission, officials said. "We consider it 'Sol 1' all over again for Opportunity," said John Callas, the mission's project manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
SCIENCE
January 23, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Old rovers can indeed learn new tricks. Rolling into its 10th anniversary on the Red Planet, Opportunity has discovered clay minerals showing that life-friendly water flowed on Mars in the earliest epoch of its history. The findings indicate that Curiosity's groundbreaking discovery last year of clays capable of hosting microbes like those on Earth was no fluke, experts said. “We've basically found strong evidence for clays on both sides of the planet,” said Cornell University planetary scientist Steve Squyres, lead scientist for NASA's Mars Exploration Rover program and coauthor of a report published in Friday's edition of the journal Science.
SCIENCE
December 5, 2012 | By Amina Khan and Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
NASA officials announced plans to build a new rover that would follow Curiosity and Opportunity on the Red Planet's surface in 2020, potentially to collect soil or rock samples that could later be sent back to Earth. The objectives are not yet set, nor are the tools the rover would wield, said John Grunsfeld, head of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. But Grunsfeld's remarks Tuesday raised the hopes of planetary scientists that NASA would be focusing its efforts on the complex and costly task of retrieving a piece of Mars.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Mars rover Spirit, hampered by a broken wheel, has failed to reach its destination and will spend the Martian winter at an alternate site, scientists said Monday. After failing three times to get it to climb McCool Hill, engineers steered Spirit to a closer slope, where it arrived over the weekend, said principal scientist Steve Squyres of Cornell University. The new site should provide enough sunlight for Spirit, but the light won't be as strong as it would have been on McCool Hill.
SCIENCE
May 28, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Mars rover Spirit has discovered several layers of rocks in a hilly region of the Red Planet that suggest a wet and violent history in the planet's early life, scientists said Tuesday. The six-wheeled robot has been examining rocks from three outcrops in the Gusev Crater region that show possible successive deposits of water-altered debris from explosive events.
SCIENCE
August 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
An instrument aboard one of the two NASA rovers en route to Mars has malfunctioned, prompting worries it could harm the robot's information-gathering ability, a Cornell researcher said. The instrument could still determine the presence of iron-bearing minerals in the rocks and soil on Mars, but not their relative abundance, Steve Squyres of Cornell University said Wednesday. Some of that information could be derived from the rover's other instruments, however.
SCIENCE
January 22, 2005 | From Reuters
The Mars rover Opportunity has discovered what scientists say is the first meteorite of any type ever identified on another planet. Opportunity encountered the basketball-sized hunk of iron and nickel during a study of its landing site in the Meridiani Planum region and used its onboard instruments to confirm the meteorite's origins, principal scientist Steve Squyres said Wednesday.
SCIENCE
December 5, 2012 | By Amina Khan and Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
NASA officials announced plans to build a new rover that would follow Curiosity and Opportunity on the Red Planet's surface in 2020, potentially to collect soil or rock samples that could later be sent back to Earth. The objectives are not yet set, nor are the tools the rover would wield, said John Grunsfeld, head of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. But Grunsfeld's remarks Tuesday raised the hopes of planetary scientists that NASA would be focusing its efforts on the complex and costly task of retrieving a piece of Mars.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2010
NASA is considering a plan to get around limited budgets set in Washington by stretching out missions to bring back samples from Mars, a researcher said Wednesday. It may be possible to break down the complicated and expensive mission into three parts, said Steve Squyres, a Cornell University astronomer who leads the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. "It makes the program more affordable because it strings out the cost over time," Squyres told reporters in a telephone briefing.
SCIENCE
April 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
NASA on Friday unveiled the landing sites where it hopes to land twin rovers on Mars in January to look for geological evidence that the Red Planet was once a warmer, wetter place hospitable to life. Data gathered from NASA satellites orbiting the planet suggest both sites once abounded in water. One is a crater into which a now-dry river apparently once emptied, perhaps turning the basin into a brimming lake.
SCIENCE
September 30, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Twenty-one months after landing on the surface of Mars, NASA's rover Opportunity is poised to look deeper into the Red Planet's watery history than ever before. The rover has reached the crest of 230-foot-deep Victoria Crater, whose exposed rock walls hold secrets of the planet's ancient past, including the time when scientists think shallow pools of water existed on the surface. "This is a geologist's dream come true," said lead scientist Steve Squyres of Cornell University.
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