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Steve Strandemo

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SPORTS
July 1, 1988 | BILL WALKER, Times Staff Writer
This village maintains little contact with the masses. If you don't have an automobile and $1.40 to gain access to its magnificent sweeping bridge, you'll have to see the town from the east, across San Diego Bay. Most residents prefer it this way, and why not? They're getting by in a country atmosphere with a marine setting and California-perfect weather. More than a few of the 19,000 residents are former high-ranking naval officers who were taken by the climate and life style.
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SPORTS
July 1, 1988 | BILL WALKER, Times Staff Writer
This village maintains little contact with the masses. If you don't have an automobile and $1.40 to gain access to its magnificent sweeping bridge, you'll have to see the town from the east, across San Diego Bay. Most residents prefer it this way, and why not? They're getting by in a country atmosphere with a marine setting and California-perfect weather. More than a few of the 19,000 residents are former high-ranking naval officers who were taken by the climate and life style.
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SPORTS
July 1, 1988 | BILL WALKER, Times Staff Writer
When the end came, Jim Turner couldn't kick. Not that he was unable, but 16 years is a millennium in professional football. Turner packed his cleated high tops and departed, prepared for an afterlife of-- racquetball? Indeed, throughout a pro football career that ended in 1979, he played this low-profile sport to maintain flexibility and keep his legs in shape for his primary occupation: booting field goals and extra points in the old-fashioned, straight-ahead style.
SPORTS
August 12, 1990 | BILL WALKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The athlete in the poster hangs suspended in midair, at the apex of a headlong dive. Look away for a moment. Couldn't that just as easily be the acrobatic Lynn Swann making another touchdown catch? Brooks Robinson, perhaps, flagging a sure extra-base hit? Although identifiable to only the most knowledgeable racquetball fan, the sprawling figure is Jerry Hilecher, once the top professional player in the world and now captured for posterity by Sports Illustrated photographer Art Shay.
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