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Steve Tesich

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steve Tesich, the Academy Award-winning screenwriter of such films as "Breaking Away" and "The World According to Garp," will speak tonight at Chapman University. Tesich's lecture will begin at 8 p.m. in Chapman Auditorium and is expected to be both informational and anecdotal, said Mark Axelrod, a Chapman comparative literature professor who organized the program. Tesich will also present a briefer keynote address at the university's Winter Writer's Workshop, which runs Saturday from 10 a.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010 | By Susan King
Claire Trevor could play tough. She sometimes even got to play tender. And on Thursday, the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre is celebrating her centenary with a classy, brassy double bill: 1948's "Key Largo," for which she won the supporting actress Oscar as gangster Edward G. Robinson's booze-hound moll, and 1944's terrific " Murder, My Sweet," starring Dick Powell as gumshoe Philip Marlowe, and Trevor as the quintessential femme fatale...
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steve Tesich may be a successful screenwriter, but he has conflicted feelings about Hollywood. Great place to get ahead, great place to make pots of money--but not always such a great place for an idealist. The artistic compromises can be so severe that Tesich, who won an Oscar for his "Breaking Away" script in 1979, says he spends much of his time turning down offers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steve Tesich may be a successful screenwriter, but he has conflicted feelings about Hollywood. Great place to get ahead, great place to make pots of money--but not always such a great place for an idealist. The artistic compromises can be so severe that Tesich, who won an Oscar for his "Breaking Away" script in 1979, says he spends much of his time turning down offers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It is slightly astonishing that a Steve Tesich play that opened on Broadway Feb. 28 of this year, receiving mixed but intriguing reviews, has surfaced in Los Angeles--not in a major venue, not in a medium-size house, but in one of the area's more enterprising small theaters. Tesich's "The Speed of Darkness" found its way to the Gnu Theatre in North Hollywood with something like the speed of light. This could be construed as a lack of takers after a relatively short Broadway run.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Oh, no! Not another feminist revue, Alice! Please say it isn't so! That might be one's first reaction to the nomenclature--"feminist revue"--but "A . . . My Name Is Alice," which opened Saturday at the Old Globe's Cassius Carter Centre Stage, is more winning than its English primer title. It has class and a decidedly optimistic (if slightly diffused) point of view, delivered by a sum total of 28 savvy contributors (from Amanda McBroom to Steve Tesich) and a director who understands the value of restraint (Julianne Boyd)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989
The summit on education presided by President Bush and the states' governors was a waste of time because the ultimate power to reform our schools does not lie with the federal or state governments, but with the 15,000 independent school districts throughout the country (Part I, Sept. 29). School board members usually are business people, politicians and those who like to attend free luncheons, dinners and parties. In short, school board members are not educators!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boy meets girl. Boy and girl move into a state-subsidized artists' co-op. Boy loses girl. Steve Tesich's "Square One," at the Hudson Theatre, is not just another romantic comedy. It's set in a society that's under the shadow of some vaguely defined "Reconstruction." The play is an intriguing blend of the creepy and the witty, with occasional dollops of the sweet. Though the evening is a bit too long in Toby Yates' staging, the ingredients are well-balanced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010 | By Susan King
Claire Trevor could play tough. She sometimes even got to play tender. And on Thursday, the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre is celebrating her centenary with a classy, brassy double bill: 1948's "Key Largo," for which she won the supporting actress Oscar as gangster Edward G. Robinson's booze-hound moll, and 1944's terrific " Murder, My Sweet," starring Dick Powell as gumshoe Philip Marlowe, and Trevor as the quintessential femme fatale...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steve Tesich, the Academy Award-winning screenwriter of such films as "Breaking Away" and "The World According to Garp," will speak tonight at Chapman University. Tesich's lecture will begin at 8 p.m. in Chapman Auditorium and is expected to be both informational and anecdotal, said Mark Axelrod, a Chapman comparative literature professor who organized the program. Tesich will also present a briefer keynote address at the university's Winter Writer's Workshop, which runs Saturday from 10 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boy meets girl. Boy and girl move into a state-subsidized artists' co-op. Boy loses girl. Steve Tesich's "Square One," at the Hudson Theatre, is not just another romantic comedy. It's set in a society that's under the shadow of some vaguely defined "Reconstruction." The play is an intriguing blend of the creepy and the witty, with occasional dollops of the sweet. Though the evening is a bit too long in Toby Yates' staging, the ingredients are well-balanced.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
George Orwell's "1984" has come and gone, and Big Brother isn't watching anyone. Well, maybe he's peeking around the corner. That's part of the premise of Steve Tesich's drama "Square One," opening Saturday at the Hudson Theatre. But that's only part of the story. The rest of it is already happening, and that's why Tesich is confronting audiences with a triptych of plays that hold up a warning sign. "There is 'Square One,' 'On the Open Road' and 'Speed of Darkness,' " Tesich says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It is slightly astonishing that a Steve Tesich play that opened on Broadway Feb. 28 of this year, receiving mixed but intriguing reviews, has surfaced in Los Angeles--not in a major venue, not in a medium-size house, but in one of the area's more enterprising small theaters. Tesich's "The Speed of Darkness" found its way to the Gnu Theatre in North Hollywood with something like the speed of light. This could be construed as a lack of takers after a relatively short Broadway run.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989
The summit on education presided by President Bush and the states' governors was a waste of time because the ultimate power to reform our schools does not lie with the federal or state governments, but with the 15,000 independent school districts throughout the country (Part I, Sept. 29). School board members usually are business people, politicians and those who like to attend free luncheons, dinners and parties. In short, school board members are not educators!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Oh, no! Not another feminist revue, Alice! Please say it isn't so! That might be one's first reaction to the nomenclature--"feminist revue"--but "A . . . My Name Is Alice," which opened Saturday at the Old Globe's Cassius Carter Centre Stage, is more winning than its English primer title. It has class and a decidedly optimistic (if slightly diffused) point of view, delivered by a sum total of 28 savvy contributors (from Amanda McBroom to Steve Tesich) and a director who understands the value of restraint (Julianne Boyd)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
George Orwell's "1984" has come and gone, and Big Brother isn't watching anyone. Well, maybe he's peeking around the corner. That's part of the premise of Steve Tesich's drama "Square One," opening Saturday at the Hudson Theatre. But that's only part of the story. The rest of it is already happening, and that's why Tesich is confronting audiences with a triptych of plays that hold up a warning sign. "There is 'Square One,' 'On the Open Road' and 'Speed of Darkness,' " Tesich says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1988
Christine Lahti, star of the film "Housekeeping," who won a New York Film Critics Award and an Academy Award nomination (best supporting actress) for "Swing Shift," will play the pivotal role of Miss Alma opposite Christopher Reeve in Tennessee Williams' "Summer and Smoke" at the Ahmanson Theatre, Feb. 18 to April 10. Lahti's Broadway credits include Steve Tesich's "Division Street," "Present Laughter" with George C. Scott and "The Country Girl" with Hal Holbrook.
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