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Steve Turner

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MAGAZINE
October 19, 1986 | BEVIS HILLIER
Few people develop a burning interest in art through the Boy Scout movement. Lighting fires by rubbing sticks together, yes. Learning how to tie a reef knot instead of a granny, yes. But judging the finer points of a Vermeer or a Matisse? Not really. There is an exception. Steve Turner, a 26-year-old Studio City attorney, began by collecting Scout badges; but, by a series of shifts of interest, he has become a collector of Danish posters from the 1890s on.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Sharon Mizota
With a historical survey focusing on “institutional critique” up at the Hammer Museum right now, it's only fitting some real-time critiques should happen elsewhere around town. Like Andrea Fraser and Fred Wilson, Austrian German artist Maria Anwander trains her eye on the structures that underlie the museum system. Although her exhibition at Steve Turner Contemporary comes across as a bit bloodless, it benefits from being right across the street from her prime target: LACMA. A banner hanging outside the gallery mimics official LACMA banners perfectly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
As exhibition titles go, "William H. Johnson: Truth Be Told" is loaded with implications. Los Angeles art dealer Steve Turner, who organized the show and came up with its provocative name, wants his audience to know that the truth has not been told about his subject. The exhibition has arrived in Southern California after a national museum tour, as the inaugural event at Turner's new gallery in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
The authority we invest in a photographic image and the veracity we assign to it aren't newly slippery issues, specific to the age of Photoshop. They are as old as photography itself -- a medium that emerged (going on 180 years ago) with simultaneous claims on both scientific accuracy and artistic license. Photography has always had a complicated relationship with truth, and different generations have probed the nature of that bond in different ways, with a range of tools and a variety of slants to their questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1985, Steve Turner, an L.A. dealer who specializes in posters, came across an anti-Semitic poster in an antiquarian bookstore in Vienna. He quickly snapped it up, recognizing that he'd stumbled across virgin territory ripe for collecting. He soon discovered, however, that though few other buyers were vying for propaganda of this sort, collecting it wouldn't be easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Sharon Mizota
With a historical survey focusing on “institutional critique” up at the Hammer Museum right now, it's only fitting some real-time critiques should happen elsewhere around town. Like Andrea Fraser and Fred Wilson, Austrian German artist Maria Anwander trains her eye on the structures that underlie the museum system. Although her exhibition at Steve Turner Contemporary comes across as a bit bloodless, it benefits from being right across the street from her prime target: LACMA. A banner hanging outside the gallery mimics official LACMA banners perfectly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
The authority we invest in a photographic image and the veracity we assign to it aren't newly slippery issues, specific to the age of Photoshop. They are as old as photography itself -- a medium that emerged (going on 180 years ago) with simultaneous claims on both scientific accuracy and artistic license. Photography has always had a complicated relationship with truth, and different generations have probed the nature of that bond in different ways, with a range of tools and a variety of slants to their questions.
NEWS
November 16, 2000 | PAULA FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marvin Gaye was one of Motown's finest, most soulful and popular recording artists. Biographer Steve Turner elaborates on the profoundly ironic turns that would lead Gaye to stardom. Born in Washington, D.C. in 1939, Gaye began singing gospel music in the church where his father served as elder when he was just 2 years old. But his relationship with cruelly abusive Marvin Gaye Sr. led the boy to tastes that lie far from the hybrid rhythm and blues music that became his hallmark.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2002 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Paintings, sculpture and works on paper from the 1930s and '40s; posters from the late 19th and early 20th centuries; California photography and ephemera from 1860 to 1960. Los Angeles art dealer Steve Turner has developed quite a list of specialties since he opened his first gallery in 1988. But in recent years he has turned his attention to yet another category--African American art--and it is consuming more and more of his time, energy and exhibition space.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Sharon Mizota
The title of 18th Street Art Center's ambitious group exhibition, "Love in a Cemetery," comes from artist Allan Kaprow, who said, "Life in the museum is like making love in a cemetery." Kaprow attempted to escape the museum's sepulchral air with "happenings," open-ended, participatory events that blurred the line between art and everyday life. In this spirit, the exhibition presents works that take place within and outside the gallery, seeking to reevaluate the relationship between cultural institutions and the communities they serve.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Sharon Mizota
The title of 18th Street Art Center's ambitious group exhibition, "Love in a Cemetery," comes from artist Allan Kaprow, who said, "Life in the museum is like making love in a cemetery." Kaprow attempted to escape the museum's sepulchral air with "happenings," open-ended, participatory events that blurred the line between art and everyday life. In this spirit, the exhibition presents works that take place within and outside the gallery, seeking to reevaluate the relationship between cultural institutions and the communities they serve.
BOOKS
December 29, 2002 | Ken Emerson, Ken Emerson is the author of "Doo-dah!: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture." He is writing a book about pop songwriters in New York City during the 1950s and '60s.
"Songs make history," Irving Berlin declared. "And history makes songs." Yet a precious few songs outlive their eras and elude, if not transcend, history. This is especially true in America, land of diversity and novelty, where tradition is short and memory shorter. It takes more than a catchy tune, a heartfelt lyric and a hook to make a standard that sticks in our scattered national consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2002 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Paintings, sculpture and works on paper from the 1930s and '40s; posters from the late 19th and early 20th centuries; California photography and ephemera from 1860 to 1960. Los Angeles art dealer Steve Turner has developed quite a list of specialties since he opened his first gallery in 1988. But in recent years he has turned his attention to yet another category--African American art--and it is consuming more and more of his time, energy and exhibition space.
NEWS
November 16, 2000 | PAULA FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marvin Gaye was one of Motown's finest, most soulful and popular recording artists. Biographer Steve Turner elaborates on the profoundly ironic turns that would lead Gaye to stardom. Born in Washington, D.C. in 1939, Gaye began singing gospel music in the church where his father served as elder when he was just 2 years old. But his relationship with cruelly abusive Marvin Gaye Sr. led the boy to tastes that lie far from the hybrid rhythm and blues music that became his hallmark.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
As exhibition titles go, "William H. Johnson: Truth Be Told" is loaded with implications. Los Angeles art dealer Steve Turner, who organized the show and came up with its provocative name, wants his audience to know that the truth has not been told about his subject. The exhibition has arrived in Southern California after a national museum tour, as the inaugural event at Turner's new gallery in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1985, Steve Turner, an L.A. dealer who specializes in posters, came across an anti-Semitic poster in an antiquarian bookstore in Vienna. He quickly snapped it up, recognizing that he'd stumbled across virgin territory ripe for collecting. He soon discovered, however, that though few other buyers were vying for propaganda of this sort, collecting it wouldn't be easy.
BOOKS
December 29, 2002 | Ken Emerson, Ken Emerson is the author of "Doo-dah!: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture." He is writing a book about pop songwriters in New York City during the 1950s and '60s.
"Songs make history," Irving Berlin declared. "And history makes songs." Yet a precious few songs outlive their eras and elude, if not transcend, history. This is especially true in America, land of diversity and novelty, where tradition is short and memory shorter. It takes more than a catchy tune, a heartfelt lyric and a hook to make a standard that sticks in our scattered national consciousness.
MAGAZINE
October 19, 1986 | BEVIS HILLIER
Few people develop a burning interest in art through the Boy Scout movement. Lighting fires by rubbing sticks together, yes. Learning how to tie a reef knot instead of a granny, yes. But judging the finer points of a Vermeer or a Matisse? Not really. There is an exception. Steve Turner, a 26-year-old Studio City attorney, began by collecting Scout badges; but, by a series of shifts of interest, he has become a collector of Danish posters from the 1890s on.
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