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Steve Valdivia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council on Friday angrily rebuked the Community Young Gang Services program for overspending its budget by more than 50%, without council approval, to beef up gang-prevention efforts in South-Central Los Angeles. Frustrated council members then ordered an independent review of the agency's effectiveness. Leaders of the program had come to the council Friday asking for an extra $600,000, saying they have delayed paying their bills in order to hire extra counselors to go into South-Central neighborhoods plagued by gang problems.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1993 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two decades as one of Los Angeles' most prominent gang experts, battling the violence that has left thousands dead, Steve Valdivia now faces his own mortality. Heart palpitations pound his chest at an irregular pace. An ulcer gnaws at his gut. Anxiety attacks leave him sweaty, gasping for air. Alcohol became a salve for pain and frustration. "I'm 43 going on 90," the executive director of Community Youth Gang Services said in a recent interview.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1993 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two decades as one of Los Angeles' most prominent gang experts, battling the violence that has left thousands dead, Steve Valdivia now faces his own mortality. Heart palpitations pound his chest at an irregular pace. An ulcer gnaws at his gut. Anxiety attacks leave him sweaty, gasping for air. Alcohol became a salve for pain and frustration. "I'm 43 going on 90," the executive director of Community Youth Gang Services said in a recent interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Community Youth Gang Services Project on Wednesday demanded that a black community newspaper retract a commentary that accused the respected anti-gang organization of operating a "snitch network" for police. The organization's youth counselors have received two threats--including one involving an alleged bomb--that may be related to the article published in the Los Angeles Sentinel on June 20, said Steve Valdivia, executive director of the gang project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Community Youth Gang Services Project on Wednesday demanded that a black community newspaper retract a commentary that accused the respected anti-gang organization of operating a "snitch network" for police. The organization's youth counselors have received two threats--including one involving an alleged bomb--that may be related to the article published in the Los Angeles Sentinel on June 20, said Steve Valdivia, executive director of the gang project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
A month ago, Steve Valdivia, director of Community Youth Gang Services, Los Angeles' largest civilian gang prevention program, had his head handed to him by several members of the Los Angeles City Council. They chewed him out in public over an alleged $600,000 budget overrun and then ordered an independent review of the program's effectiveness. The flap could not have come at a worse time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1988
Law enforcement and community leaders announced their support Monday for a bill that would provide $2.5 million to Los Angeles County education officials for anti-gang programs and related activities in "at risk" elementary and junior high schools. Among those pledging their support for the bill at the Los Angeles press conference were Cmdr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993
Bill R. Martinez, a senior planner for the Southern California Assn. of Governments, has been appointed as executive director of the Community Youth Gang Services Project, project Chairman Fernando Hernandez announced Tuesday. He replaces Steve Valdivia, who stepped down for health reasons earlier this year as head of the nation's largest anti-gang agency. Hernandez said Martinez, who was selected from more than 30 candidates, will begin his new job Oct. 18. "Mr.
NEWS
December 29, 1986
Organizers of a holiday peace treaty involving slightly more than 50 Los Angeles-area youth gangs said the truce has been very successful and they hope that it is the beginning of the end of gang violence. The truce has worked "better than expected for the first time out," Community Youth Gang Services Director Steve Valdivia said. Since the agreements were signed around Thanksgiving, only one gang killing has taken place, Valdivia said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1985 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Reacting to warnings that as many as 50 peace treaties worked out among Los Angeles-area gangs could be at stake, the county Board of Supervisors on Tuesday increased spending for a controversial community program to curb street violence. The 3-2 vote to pump $250,000 more into the Community Youth Gang Services Project was greeted by loud applause from program workers and parents, some of whom testified in favor of the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
A month ago, Steve Valdivia, director of Community Youth Gang Services, Los Angeles' largest civilian gang prevention program, had his head handed to him by several members of the Los Angeles City Council. They chewed him out in public over an alleged $600,000 budget overrun and then ordered an independent review of the program's effectiveness. The flap could not have come at a worse time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council on Friday angrily rebuked the Community Young Gang Services program for overspending its budget by more than 50%, without council approval, to beef up gang-prevention efforts in South-Central Los Angeles. Frustrated council members then ordered an independent review of the agency's effectiveness. Leaders of the program had come to the council Friday asking for an extra $600,000, saying they have delayed paying their bills in order to hire extra counselors to go into South-Central neighborhoods plagued by gang problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to the Los Angeles riots and violence elsewhere in California, a Woodland Hills-based foundation announced Wednesday that it will donate a record-setting $24 million to programs aimed at curbing unrest. The pledge of funds by the California Wellness Foundation marks the largest private contribution ever made in the state toward preventing the spread of violence, health experts said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
With his first paycheck from his new job as a youth gang counselor in hand, Jerry Anthony went Christmas shopping Sunday. He bought a black leather coat downtown for his wife, then picked up a bicycle for his 3-year-old daughter at the Sears store in East Los Angeles. By 5 p.m. he was done shopping and ready to go home. But as he was loading the bicycle into his car, two thugs accosted him.
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