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Steve Wasserman

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NEWS
October 3, 1996
Steve Wasserman, editorial director of Times Books, a division of Random House Inc., has been named book editor of the Los Angeles Times, effective Oct. 16. In making the announcement Wednesday, Times Editor and Executive Vice President Shelby Coffey III said, "Steve Wasserman combines a wealth of experience with a vast knowledge of the literary community. In his new role as book editor, Steve brings a strong sense of commitment to the continued journalistic excellence of our coverage."
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NEWS
October 3, 1996
Steve Wasserman, editorial director of Times Books, a division of Random House Inc., has been named book editor of the Los Angeles Times, effective Oct. 16. In making the announcement Wednesday, Times Editor and Executive Vice President Shelby Coffey III said, "Steve Wasserman combines a wealth of experience with a vast knowledge of the literary community. In his new role as book editor, Steve brings a strong sense of commitment to the continued journalistic excellence of our coverage."
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BOOKS
October 25, 1987 | Anthony Levitas, Levitas is a Ph.D. candidate in political science at MIT, working on the relationship between the Communist Party and professional groups in Poland and Hungary. and
It is often forgotten that the generation that came of age in the 1960s rocked the boat as much in Eastern Europe as in the West. Miklos Haraszti, born in Jerusalem in 1945 but raised and still living in Budapest, is a product and a survivor of his generation. In 1970, Haraszti was expelled from Budapest University for poetry and politics. He then found work in a tractor factory and turned his experiences into a samizdat manuscript on piece-rates and shop-floor dehumanization (published here as "A Worker in a Workers' State")
BOOKS
October 25, 1987 | Anthony Levitas, Levitas is a Ph.D. candidate in political science at MIT, working on the relationship between the Communist Party and professional groups in Poland and Hungary. and
It is often forgotten that the generation that came of age in the 1960s rocked the boat as much in Eastern Europe as in the West. Miklos Haraszti, born in Jerusalem in 1945 but raised and still living in Budapest, is a product and a survivor of his generation. In 1970, Haraszti was expelled from Budapest University for poetry and politics. He then found work in a tractor factory and turned his experiences into a samizdat manuscript on piece-rates and shop-floor dehumanization (published here as "A Worker in a Workers' State")
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | Associated Press
Hot off the presses: the complete text of President Clinton's blueprint on health care reform. "The President's Health Security Plan," a 304-page paperback, started showing up in bookstores Wednesday, according to Mary Beth Roche, a publicist for Times Books. It is being sold for $8. The document previously had been available for inspection only by key staff members on Capitol Hill.
BOOKS
October 18, 1987
I do not completely disagree with Steve Wasserman's opinions about Noam Chomsky expressed in his review of "The Chomsky Reader" (The Book Review, Aug. 30); certainly it is true that Chomsky has been "banished to the margins of political debate." But Wasserman's conclusion that Chomsky has "little to add to the political debate over American foreign policy" is nonsense. His contention that Chomsky is unoriginal because parts of his critique are derived from the ideas of Gabriel Kolko and Herbert Marcuse misses the point that these ideas might well be what is needed in a political atmosphere that runs from the extreme right to the liberal center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2003 | Steve Wasserman, Times Staff Writer
Behind every great man, it is said, stands a great woman. For Lord Nelson, it was Emma Hamilton. For Scott Fitzgerald, it was Zelda. For Kenneth Tynan, it was Elaine Dundy. Sometimes the woman is a man. For Somerset Maugham, it was Alan Searle. For W.H. Auden, it was Chester Kallman. For Christopher Isherwood, it was Don Bachardy. For Gore Vidal, it was Howard Austen, who died on Sept. 22 in Los Angeles of brain cancer at age 74.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1992 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tonight's "Beverly Hills, 90210" episode largely departs from tales of dating, shopping and teen-age Angst to give its version of a disquieting event of a year ago that drew national attention: Banning High School's refusal to play a football game against Dorsey following shootings at Dorsey's stadium. "The events surrounding Dorsey and Banning really saddened me," said Charles Rosin, the executive producer of Fox's popular drama (airing at 8 p.m., Channels 11 and 6).
BOOKS
March 31, 2002
Question: Your book is selling better than Stephen King and John Grisham, and there are now more than 400,000 copies in print without benefit of any robust publicity campaign. How do you explain the book's success? Answer: After six months of being told that dissent at this time is "unpatriotic," that questioning the leader is "inappropriate" and that they had better "watch what you say, watch what you do," I think people are tired of being told that they can't be Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
On the heels of heated meetings recently with independent producers and public broadcasters in New York and San Francisco, Corporation for Public Broadcasting executives were expecting more fireworks when they brought their roadshow to Los Angeles on Wednesday afternoon. Instead, all but a handful of the 125 or so independent filmmakers and producers in attendance were there primarily to learn more about the corporation's $20-million initiative, "America at a Crossroads."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brendan Gill, acclaimed biographer of the architect Frank Lloyd Wright, a dedicated historic preservationist and a noted writer at the New Yorker magazine since 1936, is dead at 83. Gill died Saturday in New York City of undetermined causes. His career at the New Yorker spanned all the editorial departments of the magazine. Its editor, Tina Brown, said: "He was in so many ways our beau ideal--the ultimate New Yorker."
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