Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteve Weinstock
IN THE NEWS

Steve Weinstock

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Weinstock was an engineering major at Brown University wandering the school's halls one day when a small, hand-scrawled "holography" sign outside a lab caught his eye. After venturing inside, he immediately signed up for an introductory course, and was on his way to becoming one of a small international group of fine artists in the little-recognized medium.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Weinstock was an engineering major at Brown University wandering the school's halls one day when a small, hand-scrawled "holography" sign outside a lab caught his eye. After venturing inside, he immediately signed up for an introductory course, and was on his way to becoming one of a small international group of fine artists in the little-recognized medium.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | From WASHINGTON POST
In the current era of modern decor, the path to sculptural enlightenment leads straight to the bathroom sink. Once the province of shiny white pedestals or Corian-topped cabinetry, the bathroom has become the setting for a new organic art form. There, fused-glass, wood or granite bowls hang from the wall, sit ensconced in iron stands or perch on top of furniture.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Shades of azure and lapis shimmer on a crystal field to create a collection of blues as luminescent as a rushing rapid in the afternoon sun. . . ." Does this sound like a bathroom sink? It does to Los Angeles manufacturer Steve Weinstock. He and partner Michael Murphy are unveiling Watercolors, a line of brilliantly colored glass sinks that will, they predict, "number the days of plain old white porcelain." "It's an exciting time for bathroom fixtures," said Weinstock.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Appleford writes regularly for Valley Calendar
Artist Merrilyn Duzy's smiling, winking, happy, embarrassed, brash, excited and relaxed face stared back at her a dozen times. There on the wall in front of her was her own "A Dozen Cookies," Duzy's 1985 collection of 12 self-portraits that document a variety of upbeat moods--not to mention hairstyles--from different periods of her life. The colorful images, passing from infancy through adulthood, take their collective title from Duzy's longtime nickname: Cookie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW
"Artifacts of the Street," the series of paintings by artist Randy White depicting homeless families, begins a national tour Tuesday with a five-day exhibition at Santa Monica's Lowe Gallery. The exhibition is the culmination of a project supported by Comic Relief and actress Whoopi Goldberg, in which White provided temporary housing for homeless families in his studio, where he spent three weeks creating a painting depicting the plight of each family.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A graffiti-stained no-trespassing sign and a chain-link fence guard the large patch of bulldozed dirt at York Boulevard and Avenue 53 in Highland Park. But the warning and the fence haven't kept the community's more imaginative minds at bay. Where others see an ugly vacant lot, they see a field of dreams. Some envision an artists' village on the site. Others see a preschool; still others favor an after-school cultural enrichment center.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you thought the $50,000 luxury SUV was the pinnacle of vehicular excess, just wait for the luxury pickup truck. Despite soaring gasoline prices and a weakening national economy, Lincoln and Cadillac both are preparing to launch ultra-luxury versions of the pickup, an American blue-collar icon. Ford Motor Co.'s Lincoln will lead the way with the Blackwood, due in dealerships late this summer. General Motors Corp.'s Cadillac plays catch-up in the first quarter of 2002 with the Escalade EXT.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
FACES "We are the survivors, we are the only ones who can tell the story." Such was the realization that came to Alice Lok Cahana, a Hungarian-born survivor of the Holocaust, who had spent more than 10 years painting about her "happy American life" and trying to forget the pain of the concentration camps and the loss of family members including her mother and sister. Since that realization during a 1978 visit to her native country, Cahana has done her part to tell that story.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|