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Steve Wick

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NEWS
July 15, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
After Roy Radin's disappearance, film producer Bob Evans, believing he was Jacob's next target, traveled to Las Vegas to seek help from two friends who he thought were connected to the Mob, as author Steve Wick reports in this excerpt from the book "Bad Company: Drugs, Hollywood and the Cotton Club Murder."
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BOOKS
July 22, 1990 | Dennis McDougal, McDougal, a Times staff writer, covered the Cotton Club murder court proceedings. His first book, "Dark Angel," about serial killer Randy Kraft, will be published next May
There is hype surrounding publication of Newsday reporter Steve Wick's engrossing and meticulously researched first book, "Bad Company: Drugs, Hollywood and the Cotton Club Murder." The saddest commentary about the superfluous fanfare is that overstatement is totally unnecessary.
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NEWS
July 13, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
The prospect of a partnership between Roy Radin and producer Bob Evans enraged the woman who introduced them. Laney Jacobs wanted in on the deal to produce "The Cotton Club," which she felt she had put together. She also accused Radin of having knowledge of a $1-million cocaine theft from her garage, where she stored the powder before distribution.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | STEVE WICK
A word on methodology is in order. The material in "Bad Company" was based on interviews conducted over a period of several years. In addition to interviews, I also used court records, in Florida, New York and California, as the basis for parts of the narrative. The record of criminal proceedings in Los Angeles is particularly detailed and voluminous. The proceedings arising out of the events recounted in the chapters of "Bad Company" and the epilogue are still pending.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
After Playboy centerfold Melonie Haller was assaulted at Roy Radin's Southampton, N.Y., beachfront home, Radin moved to the West Coast in hopes of starting over. There he met Karen (Laney) Jacobs, an aspiring producer who offered to introduce him to a man who could make his dream of a Cotton Club musical a reality.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
The killing of theater impresario Roy Radin in June, 1983, was originally considered just another unsolved homicide case. But investigators soon uncovered a complex trail of drugs, corruption and dizzying amounts of cash. In Southern California, the country near the town of Gorman is remarkably rugged. There are ravines and gullies where the terrain is steep and irregular, rising and falling sharply.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | STEVE WICK
A word on methodology is in order. The material in "Bad Company" was based on interviews conducted over a period of several years. In addition to interviews, I also used court records, in Florida, New York and California, as the basis for parts of the narrative. The record of criminal proceedings in Los Angeles is particularly detailed and voluminous. The proceedings arising out of the events recounted in the chapters of "Bad Company" and the epilogue are still pending.
BOOKS
July 22, 1990 | Dennis McDougal, McDougal, a Times staff writer, covered the Cotton Club murder court proceedings. His first book, "Dark Angel," about serial killer Randy Kraft, will be published next May
There is hype surrounding publication of Newsday reporter Steve Wick's engrossing and meticulously researched first book, "Bad Company: Drugs, Hollywood and the Cotton Club Murder." The saddest commentary about the superfluous fanfare is that overstatement is totally unnecessary.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1990
What or who influenced you to serialize that awful book, "Bad Company," (July 11-15) by Steve Wick--a poorly written replay of a sordid drug murder of sleazy people? If you want lighter reading, confer with someone with taste. R. N. SMITH Palos Verdes Estates
TRAVEL
July 24, 1988 | BARRY ZWICK, Zwick is a Times assistant news editor.
My head was gone in a moment; I did not know which end I stood on; I gasped and could not get my breath; I spun the wheel down with such rapidity that it wove itself together like a spider's web. From "Life on the Mississippi" by Mark Twain When the young Samuel Clemens was a river-boat pilot just before the Civil War, navigating the Mississippi was like threading a needle. There were no dams or dredges, the river changed course every few weeks and new reefs popped up like weeds.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
After Roy Radin's disappearance, film producer Bob Evans, believing he was Jacob's next target, traveled to Las Vegas to seek help from two friends who he thought were connected to the Mob, as author Steve Wick reports in this excerpt from the book "Bad Company: Drugs, Hollywood and the Cotton Club Murder."
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
The prospect of a partnership between Roy Radin and producer Bob Evans enraged the woman who introduced them. Laney Jacobs wanted in on the deal to produce "The Cotton Club," which she felt she had put together. She also accused Radin of having knowledge of a $1-million cocaine theft from her garage, where she stored the powder before distribution.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
After Playboy centerfold Melonie Haller was assaulted at Roy Radin's Southampton, N.Y., beachfront home, Radin moved to the West Coast in hopes of starting over. There he met Karen (Laney) Jacobs, an aspiring producer who offered to introduce him to a man who could make his dream of a Cotton Club musical a reality.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | STEVE WICK, Steve Wick is a bureau chief with Newsday and spent three years researching "Bad Company." A member of Newsday's 1984 Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting team, he lives on Long Island, N.Y., with his wife and three children.
The killing of theater impresario Roy Radin in June, 1983, was originally considered just another unsolved homicide case. But investigators soon uncovered a complex trail of drugs, corruption and dizzying amounts of cash. In Southern California, the country near the town of Gorman is remarkably rugged. There are ravines and gullies where the terrain is steep and irregular, rising and falling sharply.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2011
The Age of Movies The Selected Writings of Pauline Kael Edited by Sanford Schwartz Library of America, $40 Witty, entertaining and often exhilarating, this wide-ranging collection of pieces captures the film critic at her best. Alice James A Biography Jean Strouse, preface by Colm Tóibín New York Review Books, $17.95 paper The acclaimed biographer of financier J.P. Morgan chronicles the brief but brilliant life of the younger sister of William and Henry James.
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