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Steve Wilson

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SPORTS
April 24, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In searching for what has made Steve Wilson the Dodgers' brightest relief pitcher, do not look in the usual places. It is not in his arm. Or his legs. Or his back pocket. To understand Wilson's success, tell him something that will make him smile, which is almost anything. Then look in his mouth. Two chipped teeth--one upper, one lower--are a testament to Wilson's secret. He pitches like he used to play hockey. "I have to admit, hockey is my favorite sport," Wilson said with a Canadian accent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Alto saxophonist Steve Wilson is leading what can only be described as an all-star quartet at the Jazz Bakery this week.
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SPORTS
May 21, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Steve Wilson acknowledged it was "funny" facing his former Cub teammates for the first time Tuesday. Wilson induced Jose Vizcaino into a pop out in the eighth inning with two runners on base. "Every player wants to do good against his old team, to show them that they made a mistake by trading him," Wilson said. "But I wasn't thinking too much about that. I was just glad to get a chance to pitch against them." . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1998 | Don Heckman
"Quality" is a word that frequently comes to mind with each new Holland album. Despite the varying instrumental combinations that have characterized his long recording career, each outing seems to be done with exquisite concern for detail and a total emphasis on the music. It's no mystery why he has been the bassist of choice for artists ranging in diversity from Miles Davis, Stan Getz and Anthony Braxton to John McLaughlin, Ben Webster and Betty Carter.
NEWS
February 6, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Alto saxophonist Steve Wilson is leading what can only be described as an all-star quartet at the Jazz Bakery this week.
SPORTS
March 23, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON
Dodger left-handed reliever Steve Wilson was released Tuesday after clearing waivers. Wilson, 29, had never equaled the success he had in helping the Dodgers down the stretch in 1991. After the Dodgers had claimed him on waivers that September from the Chicago Cubs, Wilson did not give up a run and yielded only one hit in 11 games, a total of 8.1 innings. But he faltered early during the 1992 season and lost confidence, as did Manager Tom Lasorda.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1998 | Don Heckman
"Quality" is a word that frequently comes to mind with each new Holland album. Despite the varying instrumental combinations that have characterized his long recording career, each outing seems to be done with exquisite concern for detail and a total emphasis on the music. It's no mystery why he has been the bassist of choice for artists ranging in diversity from Miles Davis, Stan Getz and Anthony Braxton to John McLaughlin, Ben Webster and Betty Carter.
SPORTS
September 7, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE
In a move that won't help the Dodgers in the playoffs but could help them get there, they acquired left-handed pitcher Steve Wilson from the Chicago Cubs Friday for minor league pitcher Jeff Hartsock. The Dodgers also got what they hope will be insurance by purchasing the contract of right-handed pitcher Mike Christopher from triple-A Albuquerque. Wilson, who will not be eligible from the playoffs because he is joining the roster after Aug. 31, had no decision and a 4.
SPORTS
September 8, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Compared to what he endured the previous night, Steve Wilson didn't even quiver when asked to help the Dodgers stay ahead of the Pittsburgh Pirates Saturday. Facing Barry Bonds with the tying and go-ahead runs on first and third bases in the eighth inning? With none out? And after throwing three consecutive balls? Nothing to it.
SPORTS
July 25, 1995 | GEORGE DOHRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is early Saturday morning and the last thing on Steve Wilson's mind is the Los Angeles Blades' roller hockey game against the San Diego Barracudas that evening. His wife, Susan, is still sleeping in their Manhattan Beach home, so Wilson rises quickly and moves on soft feet as he changes into a swimsuit and grabs his surfboard. Only a few minutes pass before he closes the door and runs to the beach.
SPORTS
July 25, 1995 | GEORGE DOHRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is early Saturday morning and the last thing on Steve Wilson's mind is the Los Angeles Blades' roller hockey game against the San Diego Barracudas that evening. His wife, Susan, is still sleeping in their Manhattan Beach home, so Wilson rises quickly and moves on soft feet as he changes into a swimsuit and grabs his surfboard. Only a few minutes pass before he closes the door and runs to the beach.
NEWS
March 29, 1995 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the board game of presidential politics, Gov. Pete Wilson stepped Tuesday onto the square marked: "Start here." Wilson came to the New Hampshire state Capitol on a brisk and sunny spring day where he told a group of celebrity-seasoned local reporters that he would be the third transplanted California governor since the '80s to make an appeal to Granite State voters.
SPORTS
March 23, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON
Dodger left-handed reliever Steve Wilson was released Tuesday after clearing waivers. Wilson, 29, had never equaled the success he had in helping the Dodgers down the stretch in 1991. After the Dodgers had claimed him on waivers that September from the Chicago Cubs, Wilson did not give up a run and yielded only one hit in 11 games, a total of 8.1 innings. But he faltered early during the 1992 season and lost confidence, as did Manager Tom Lasorda.
SPORTS
February 21, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Left-handed reliever Steve Wilson stayed in shape during the off-season by throwing in the basement of a sporting goods store in Vancouver, Canada. "There was snow outside on the ground, and we don't have high school or college baseball programs there, so it was the only place I could go," Wilson said. Wilson, who was acquired on waivers from the Chicago Cubs in September of 1991, is the only left-handed pitcher remaining on the Dodger roster, but that doesn't guarantee his job.
SPORTS
May 21, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Steve Wilson acknowledged it was "funny" facing his former Cub teammates for the first time Tuesday. Wilson induced Jose Vizcaino into a pop out in the eighth inning with two runners on base. "Every player wants to do good against his old team, to show them that they made a mistake by trading him," Wilson said. "But I wasn't thinking too much about that. I was just glad to get a chance to pitch against them." . . .
SPORTS
April 24, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In searching for what has made Steve Wilson the Dodgers' brightest relief pitcher, do not look in the usual places. It is not in his arm. Or his legs. Or his back pocket. To understand Wilson's success, tell him something that will make him smile, which is almost anything. Then look in his mouth. Two chipped teeth--one upper, one lower--are a testament to Wilson's secret. He pitches like he used to play hockey. "I have to admit, hockey is my favorite sport," Wilson said with a Canadian accent.
SPORTS
February 21, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Left-handed reliever Steve Wilson stayed in shape during the off-season by throwing in the basement of a sporting goods store in Vancouver, Canada. "There was snow outside on the ground, and we don't have high school or college baseball programs there, so it was the only place I could go," Wilson said. Wilson, who was acquired on waivers from the Chicago Cubs in September of 1991, is the only left-handed pitcher remaining on the Dodger roster, but that doesn't guarantee his job.
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