Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteve Yeager
IN THE NEWS

Steve Yeager

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
July 12, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Yeager, a strong-armed catcher, was a member of six division-winning Dodger clubs from 1972 to 1985. He also introduced the "neck protector"--the flap that hangs from the bottom of a catcher's mask--after a 1976 accident in which he was speared in the neck by the jagged edge of a broken bat while waiting in the on-deck circle. Now 45, Yeager recently took a temporary leave from his job as a sportscaster on KJOI-AM to spend more time with his two sons.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 4, 1997 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A six-line classified ad in the Fresno Bee followed by a call from former Dodger catcher Steve Yeager were enough for Gary Beaudette to withdraw $2,950 from his 401-K plan, at a great penalty. Beaudette, 40, a sales manager for a roofing company, responded to the sports collectibles company's pitch. Then a phone call from the former World Series hero to his Modesto home about two weeks later closed the deal, Beaudette said.
Advertisement
SPORTS
June 4, 1997 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A six-line classified ad in the Fresno Bee followed by a call from former Dodger catcher Steve Yeager were enough for Gary Beaudette to withdraw $2,950 from his 401-K plan, at a great penalty. Beaudette, 40, a sales manager for a roofing company, responded to the sports collectibles company's pitch. Then a phone call from the former World Series hero to his Modesto home about two weeks later closed the deal, Beaudette said.
SPORTS
July 12, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Yeager, a strong-armed catcher, was a member of six division-winning Dodger clubs from 1972 to 1985. He also introduced the "neck protector"--the flap that hangs from the bottom of a catcher's mask--after a 1976 accident in which he was speared in the neck by the jagged edge of a broken bat while waiting in the on-deck circle. Now 45, Yeager recently took a temporary leave from his job as a sportscaster on KJOI-AM to spend more time with his two sons.
SPORTS
October 14, 1988 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Sure, it's make-believe, it's directors and lights and, yuck, makeup. The only makeup Steve Yeager ever wore before was dirt in the shape of a cleat. Sure, it was only a movie. That's what the former Dodger catcher kept telling himself last summer while being run over at home plate to the odd cheer of, "Good, now do it again." That's what he tried to convince himself of while making repeated throws to second base, good throws, enough to make actors Tom Berenger and Charlie Sheen stare.
SPORTS
March 27, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
They call it Christmas in Dodgertown, an annual affair in which Santa Claus sets up shop pool-side and distributes gifts to all the good little sons and daughters of Dodger personnel. A fine time is had by all. At least, that's the plan. It didn't quite work out that way Tuesday for catcher Jack Fimple. All he wanted for Christmas, even if it was March in Florida, was a job with the Dodgers. Instead, he was optioned to the minors. Merry Christmas, Jack.
SPORTS
July 6, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Steve Yeager came crawling out from wherever the Dodgers keep him, the bones cracking and the screws in his leg creaking, and made Cardinal Manager Whitey Herzog a believer in the afterlife Friday night. "He'll be throwing like that when he's in his coffin," Herzog said in admiration, after Yeager, unlimbering his right arm following 17 days of inactivity, gunned down the only two St. Louis runners who dared to challenge him in the Dodgers' 4-1 win before 39,296 at Busch Stadium.
SPORTS
July 8, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Tom Lasorda called them a "bunch of conejos ." Don't know what a conejo is? "Go look it up in the flipping dictionary," Lasorda said after the St. Louis Conejos , a/k/a Cardinals, made the Dodgers look like so many Elmer Fudds in a 7-1 loss Sunday afternoon before 36,313 fans who also recognize a rabbit when they see one, no matter what you call it.
SPORTS
July 22, 1985 | SCOTT OSTLER
'Scuse me, is this the Dodger bandwagon? Got room for one more? I'll just jump on and squeeze in the back here, ride along for a spell, if you don't mind. Getting pretty crowded on this bandwagon, I see. What do you mean, where have I been? You expected me to jump on earlier? Did you see this team earlier? This was the most boring team in baseball for the first couple months of the season, although I haven't seen all the teams in the Japanese League. Now the Dodgers are exciting .
SPORTS
March 3, 1986 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
It is the hope of the Seattle Mariners that the acquisition of Steve Yeager will help a touted young pitching staff cure a case of shakes. The issue here isn't jittery nerves. The issue seems to be a lack of confidence by the Mariners' staff in the pitch selection of Bob Kearney, the first-string catcher each of the last two years.
SPORTS
October 14, 1988 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Sure, it's make-believe, it's directors and lights and, yuck, makeup. The only makeup Steve Yeager ever wore before was dirt in the shape of a cleat. Sure, it was only a movie. That's what the former Dodger catcher kept telling himself last summer while being run over at home plate to the odd cheer of, "Good, now do it again." That's what he tried to convince himself of while making repeated throws to second base, good throws, enough to make actors Tom Berenger and Charlie Sheen stare.
SPORTS
December 11, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
In separate deals here Wednesday, the Dodgers apparently filled their No. 1 need--bullpen help--and satisfied the wishes of Greg Brock, their former No. 1 first baseman. First, they traded pitcher Dennis Powell and minor league infielder Mike Watters to the Seattle Mariners for left-handed short reliever Matt Young, who is projected as the Dodgers' left-handed stopper. Then they went right back to their war room and traded Brock to the Milwaukee Brewers.
SPORTS
March 3, 1986 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
It is the hope of the Seattle Mariners that the acquisition of Steve Yeager will help a touted young pitching staff cure a case of shakes. The issue here isn't jittery nerves. The issue seems to be a lack of confidence by the Mariners' staff in the pitch selection of Bob Kearney, the first-string catcher each of the last two years.
SPORTS
July 22, 1985 | SCOTT OSTLER
'Scuse me, is this the Dodger bandwagon? Got room for one more? I'll just jump on and squeeze in the back here, ride along for a spell, if you don't mind. Getting pretty crowded on this bandwagon, I see. What do you mean, where have I been? You expected me to jump on earlier? Did you see this team earlier? This was the most boring team in baseball for the first couple months of the season, although I haven't seen all the teams in the Japanese League. Now the Dodgers are exciting .
SPORTS
July 8, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Tom Lasorda called them a "bunch of conejos ." Don't know what a conejo is? "Go look it up in the flipping dictionary," Lasorda said after the St. Louis Conejos , a/k/a Cardinals, made the Dodgers look like so many Elmer Fudds in a 7-1 loss Sunday afternoon before 36,313 fans who also recognize a rabbit when they see one, no matter what you call it.
SPORTS
July 6, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Steve Yeager came crawling out from wherever the Dodgers keep him, the bones cracking and the screws in his leg creaking, and made Cardinal Manager Whitey Herzog a believer in the afterlife Friday night. "He'll be throwing like that when he's in his coffin," Herzog said in admiration, after Yeager, unlimbering his right arm following 17 days of inactivity, gunned down the only two St. Louis runners who dared to challenge him in the Dodgers' 4-1 win before 39,296 at Busch Stadium.
SPORTS
December 11, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
In separate deals here Wednesday, the Dodgers apparently filled their No. 1 need--bullpen help--and satisfied the wishes of Greg Brock, their former No. 1 first baseman. First, they traded pitcher Dennis Powell and minor league infielder Mike Watters to the Seattle Mariners for left-handed short reliever Matt Young, who is projected as the Dodgers' left-handed stopper. Then they went right back to their war room and traded Brock to the Milwaukee Brewers.
SPORTS
March 27, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
They call it Christmas in Dodgertown, an annual affair in which Santa Claus sets up shop pool-side and distributes gifts to all the good little sons and daughters of Dodger personnel. A fine time is had by all. At least, that's the plan. It didn't quite work out that way Tuesday for catcher Jack Fimple. All he wanted for Christmas, even if it was March in Florida, was a job with the Dodgers. Instead, he was optioned to the minors. Merry Christmas, Jack.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|