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Steve York

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Stereotypes are falling, the line separating good guys and bad guys blurring. Some bold journalists and film makers get some of the credit: --"60 Minutes" sent Morley Safer to Hanoi for an incredible piece on the Vietnam war from the perspective of the North Vietnamese. This March 19 story was one of the most profound "60 Minutes" segments ever. When one North Vietnamese veteran expressed his lingering anguish over killing an American Marine, it was . . . something.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Stereotypes are falling, the line separating good guys and bad guys blurring. Some bold journalists and film makers get some of the credit: --"60 Minutes" sent Morley Safer to Hanoi for an incredible piece on the Vietnam war from the perspective of the North Vietnamese. This March 19 story was one of the most profound "60 Minutes" segments ever. When one North Vietnamese veteran expressed his lingering anguish over killing an American Marine, it was . . . something.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
"Selling the Dream," an exploration of the world of advertising and its effects on American culture, is as engrossing as . . . well, a good television commercial. This episode of "Smithsonian World," airing at 9 tonight on Channels 28 and 15, skillfully examines the history of modern advertising and records the creation of a $100-million national ad campaign in 1990 for the introduction of the new Mitsubishi 3000 GT.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The producers of the documentary "A Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict," initially had a hard time convincing programmers at public television of the merits of their idea, partly because the concept, on paper, didn't promise enough drama. It sounded too, well, passive. Eventually PBS came around, however. And in an irony not lost on those associated with the program, the two-part, three-hour show, which airs Monday and Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To honor the late James Bridges, whose name graces the theater in UCLA's Melnitz Hall, the university's School of Film, Theater and Television and its Film and Television Archive will screen at 7:30 tonight one of Bridges' best yet most underrated films, the 1984 "Mike's Murder," which only looks better with the passing of time.
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