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January 3, 2005 | Robert K. Elder, Chicago Tribune
In the end credits of Wes Anderson's "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," there's an acknowledgement that Steve Zissou (played by Bill Murray) is a real person. No, it's not a joke. Though writer-director Anderson ("The Royal Tenenbaums," "Rushmore") made the name up, the script clearance department at Buena Vista Pictures found a real Steve Zissou. That Zissou is a criminal trial lawyer based in Bay Side, N.Y., not a burned-out underwater explorer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The release of a new Wes Anderson film has been a highly anticipated event among the quirky filmmaker's fans ever since his breakout success "Rushmore" in 1998. "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is debuting in four theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Friday, is sure to continue that tradition.  The movie takes place in Eastern Europe between World War I and World War II and stars Ralph Fiennes as a hotel concierge who befriends a lobby boy. It has generally won over critics, as indicated by a 89% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes -- a good sign for a limited release poised to expand nationwide over the next few weeks.  REVIEW: Wes Anderson makes 'Grand Budapest' a four-star delight Better known for offbeat critical darlings than box office smashes, Anderson has nonetheless generated  some money-makers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The release of a new Wes Anderson film has been a highly anticipated event among the quirky filmmaker's fans ever since his breakout success "Rushmore" in 1998. "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is debuting in four theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Friday, is sure to continue that tradition.  The movie takes place in Eastern Europe between World War I and World War II and stars Ralph Fiennes as a hotel concierge who befriends a lobby boy. It has generally won over critics, as indicated by a 89% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes -- a good sign for a limited release poised to expand nationwide over the next few weeks.  REVIEW: Wes Anderson makes 'Grand Budapest' a four-star delight Better known for offbeat critical darlings than box office smashes, Anderson has nonetheless generated  some money-makers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Once in a while the Criterion Collection, which has built a reputation for classy, well-researched digital editions of vintage American movies and documentaries and international art house fare, offers a contemporary film. This week brings the latest of U.S. director Wes Anderson's films, "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou" ($33).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
On the face of it, Wes Anderson's new movie, "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," is an adventure tale about a Jacques Cousteau-on-the-skids-type who decides to pull an Ahab on the shark that ate his buddy. But mostly, like all Wes Anderson movies, it's about being 11 1/2 -- it's a recurring motif, anyway -- sometime around the late '70s, an age-era axis favored by Anderson and at least partly attributable to his current age of 35. But Anderson doesn't make nostalgic movies, exactly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2004 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
WILLEM DAFOE conjures up the image of coiled intensity. During his quarter of a century on screen, he's played more than his share of villains and madmen. By his own admission, he was never "the boy next door." Starting out as an extra in the ill-fated "Heaven's Gate," the actor was cast as a postmodern heavy in 1985's "To Live and Die in L.A.," his breakthrough film, and nominated for a best supporting actor Oscar as the title character in 2000's "Shadow of the Vampire."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Once in a while the Criterion Collection, which has built a reputation for classy, well-researched digital editions of vintage American movies and documentaries and international art house fare, offers a contemporary film. This week brings the latest of U.S. director Wes Anderson's films, "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou" ($33).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bill Murray gets defensive when told he has a reputation for being difficult. "If it keeps obnoxious people away, that's fine," the star of "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou" tells Time magazine. "It makes me think of that line, 'You catch more flies with honey than vinegar.' People say this to you with a straight face, and I always say, 'Who wants flies?' "
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Go figure: Films starring Jim Carrey and Bill Murray walked off with honors at the seventh annual Costume Designers Guild Awards. Colleen Atwood, who dressed Carrey and company in "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events," won for excellence in a fantasy/period film, while the award for contemporary film went to Milena Canonero for "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," starring Murray. Atwood is also nominated for an Oscar.
MAGAZINE
September 17, 2006
Saturday is Fish Amnesty Day, when you're supposed to give the angling a rest and the gilled creatures among us a brief reprieve. Of course, that makes it Worm Amnesty Day, too, but that's a whole different story. Since you won't be heading out to the pond, stream or mighty Pacific with a pole in hand, we suggest that you mark the holiday with a fine meal--all turf, no surf. Even Michael Cimarusti, the executive chef at the celebrated seafood restaurant Providence, approves.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2005 | Robert K. Elder, Chicago Tribune
In the end credits of Wes Anderson's "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," there's an acknowledgement that Steve Zissou (played by Bill Murray) is a real person. No, it's not a joke. Though writer-director Anderson ("The Royal Tenenbaums," "Rushmore") made the name up, the script clearance department at Buena Vista Pictures found a real Steve Zissou. That Zissou is a criminal trial lawyer based in Bay Side, N.Y., not a burned-out underwater explorer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
On the face of it, Wes Anderson's new movie, "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," is an adventure tale about a Jacques Cousteau-on-the-skids-type who decides to pull an Ahab on the shark that ate his buddy. But mostly, like all Wes Anderson movies, it's about being 11 1/2 -- it's a recurring motif, anyway -- sometime around the late '70s, an age-era axis favored by Anderson and at least partly attributable to his current age of 35. But Anderson doesn't make nostalgic movies, exactly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2004 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
WILLEM DAFOE conjures up the image of coiled intensity. During his quarter of a century on screen, he's played more than his share of villains and madmen. By his own admission, he was never "the boy next door." Starting out as an extra in the ill-fated "Heaven's Gate," the actor was cast as a postmodern heavy in 1985's "To Live and Die in L.A.," his breakthrough film, and nominated for a best supporting actor Oscar as the title character in 2000's "Shadow of the Vampire."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2005
Source: Exhibitor Relations Co. Los Angeles Times *--* MOVIE 3-DAY TOTAL VENUES AVG WEEKS (STUDIO) GROSS (Millions) PER (MILLIONS) VENUE 1 Meet the Fockers $28.5 $204.3 3,527 $8,080 3 (Universal) 2 White Noise $24.1 $24.1 2,261 $10,665 1 (Universal) 3 The Aviator (Miramax) $7.5 $42.8 1,867 $4,013 4 4 Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unusual $7.4 $105.6 3,343 $2,225 4 Events (Paramount) 5 Fat Albert (Fox) $5.7 $41.0 2,675 $2,149 3 6 Ocean's Twelve $5.3 $115.3 3,010 $1,764 5 (Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2008 | Jen Chaney, Chaney writes for the Washington Post.
The Criterion Collection has been good to Wes Anderson. Over the years, the studio has released meticulously crafted DVDs of his films "Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums" and "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," each time paying tribute to the writer-director's particular brand of off-kilter yet earnest filmmaking. Now there is a fourth DVD to add to that list.
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