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Steven A Burd

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BUSINESS
May 15, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
The $32.7-billion Massachusetts state pension fund will withhold proxy votes to reelect Safeway Inc. Chairman and Chief Executive Steven Burd and two board members because of the company's performance and corporate governance issues. State Treasurer Timothy Cahill, chairman of the Massachusetts Pension Reserves Investment Management Board, said the pension fund was withholding votes from Burd, Robert MacDonnell and William Tauscher.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
Safeway Inc. Chief Executive Steven Burd's pay package totaled $19.5 million in 2004 -- a tumultuous year marked by a Southern and Central California labor dispute that embittered the grocer's workers and alienated shoppers. Burd generated $17.2 million of the windfall by cashing in 1.15 million of the stock options that he had accumulated since becoming Safeway's CEO in 1993. He also received a $1.14-million base salary and a $1.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
Safeway Inc. Chief Executive Steven Burd's pay package totaled $19.5 million in 2004 -- a tumultuous year marked by a Southern and Central California labor dispute that embittered the grocer's workers and alienated shoppers. Burd generated $17.2 million of the windfall by cashing in 1.15 million of the stock options that he had accumulated since becoming Safeway's CEO in 1993. He also received a $1.14-million base salary and a $1.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
The $32.7-billion Massachusetts state pension fund will withhold proxy votes to reelect Safeway Inc. Chairman and Chief Executive Steven Burd and two board members because of the company's performance and corporate governance issues. State Treasurer Timothy Cahill, chairman of the Massachusetts Pension Reserves Investment Management Board, said the pension fund was withholding votes from Burd, Robert MacDonnell and William Tauscher.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times staff writer
Scores of religious leaders and supermarket workers, some with children in tow, had traveled hundreds of miles from Southern California to personally deliver a message to Safeway Inc. Chief Executive Steven Burd. But on Wednesday morning, when they arrived in Alamo, east of Oakland, they were stopped about a mile from the gates to his affluent community.
HEALTH
January 31, 2011
Your Jan. 3 story "Is It Your Boss' Business?" contains a misrepresentation about Safeway's experience controlling healthcare costs. Here are the facts straight from the source. Safeway's "all in" healthcare costs (for employees and the company) are the same today as they were five years ago, which is 33% lower than the national average increase in healthcare costs. During this period, Safeway reversed the national trend of rising obesity within our workforce and reduced the weight of that same group year-over-year.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Heeding shareholders' advice, supermarket giant Safeway Inc. said Wednesday that it was seeking to require all of its directors to face annual elections beginning in 2005. The Pleasanton, Calif.-based grocer separates its nine-member board into three classes that allow directors to serve as many as three years before coming up for reelection. The practice alienated shareholders, who last May approved a nonbinding measure advising Safeway to revise the system.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2003
"Safeway Chief at Center of Standoff" (Oct. 19) galvanized my support of the United Food and Commercial Workers' strike against the supermarket chains. I was a retail clerk: I pushed carts in the rain, was a cashier who worked by the automatic doors that allowed cold air to keep my working conditions at a brisk 60 degrees, worked many holidays and avoided answering my phone on days off for fear of being called in to work because management didn't adequately staff for the day. (If you decline work when they call, your scheduled hours are reduced the next week.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2003 | James F. Peltz and Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writers
A shareholder lawsuit alleges that Safeway Inc. Chief Executive Steven A. Burd and other insiders mismanaged assets, concealed problems at the supermarket chain and illegally enriched themselves, all while driving down Safeway's market value by nearly $15 billion. The suit was filed Thursday in San Mateo County Superior Court by the Pinellas Park, Fla.
OPINION
September 15, 2013 | By Rahul K. Parikh
Would you be willing to share with your employer how much you eat, drink, smoke or exercise? And would you be willing to make lifestyle changes in return for a break on the cost of your health insurance? The University of Minnesota offered such discounts to its workers. Actions such as completing a health questionnaire, biking to campus or setting personal fitness goals earned insurance discounts beginning at $300. Nearly 6,000 employees accepted the bargain. But do such programs have the intended effect of healthier employees and lower healthcare costs?
BUSINESS
January 29, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times staff writer
Scores of religious leaders and supermarket workers, some with children in tow, had traveled hundreds of miles from Southern California to personally deliver a message to Safeway Inc. Chief Executive Steven Burd. But on Wednesday morning, when they arrived in Alamo, east of Oakland, they were stopped about a mile from the gates to his affluent community.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2004 | Melinda Fulmer and Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writers
Safeway Inc. recently awarded 11 senior and executive vice presidents millions of dollars in stock grants and options under a new compensation plan that is drawing fire from labor leaders and others. The plan came together in the wake of four high-profile corporate defections last year, including that of the chief financial officer, Vasant Prabhu, who left to join Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2003 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to end the monthlong Southern California supermarket strike, the nation's top mediator said he would bring both sides back to the bargaining table Monday for the first time since the labor dispute began. Peter J. Hurtgen, director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, initiated the meeting between the three major grocery chains and the union representing 70,000 workers.
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