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Steven A Camarota

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial new study by a Washington group favoring reduced levels of immigration draws a grim picture of the economic and social consequences of large-scale immigration to the United States from Mexico--especially in California. The continuing influx of poor settlers from Mexico provides marginal economic benefits while burdening public services and schools and creating generations of poverty, according to the report, released Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial new study by a Washington group favoring reduced levels of immigration draws a grim picture of the economic and social consequences of large-scale immigration to the United States from Mexico--especially in California. The continuing influx of poor settlers from Mexico provides marginal economic benefits while burdening public services and schools and creating generations of poverty, according to the report, released Thursday.
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NEWS
January 23, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of illegal immigrants from the Middle East--more than 100,000--would not normally jump out from a census report that estimates 8.7 million people are in the United States unlawfully from all regions of the world. But on Tuesday, advocates for reduced immigration seized on the preliminary findings--criticized as unreliable by other experts--as ammunition in the debate over U.S. immigration policy and whether undocumented workers should be granted some form of amnesty.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sept. 11 hijackers departed from the pattern of earlier terrorists by initially entering the country legally and breaking comparatively few laws before the attacks, according to an analysis released Wednesday. While Islamic terrorist schemes in the 1990s involved permanent U.S. residents and naturalized citizens, the Sept.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pace of foreign immigration to California has finally slowed after an extraordinary three-decade surge and, as a result, poverty among immigrants is on the decline, according to a USC study to be released today. The key change is a significant drop in the proportion of new arrivals and the sharp growth of a more stable immigrant population consisting of those who have lived in the state for 10 years or more, the study said. Immigrants tend to do better economically the longer they are here.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2004 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Illegal immigrants cost the federal government more than $10 billion a year, and a program to legalize them would nearly triple the figure, a study released Wednesday said. The analysis by the Center for Immigration Studies, which opposes efforts to legalize the estimated 8 million to 12 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, comes as Republicans are bracing for a fight over immigration at their convention next week in New York.
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today's record-setting economic boom has enriched most members of every major ethnic group except one--Latinos. The Federal Reserve's most recent survey of household finances shows that whites, African Americans and Asians have all gained ground during the expansion. By contrast, from 1995 to 1998--the most recent period studied--the median Latino household net worth fell by a whopping 24%.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2004 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Adapting a concept that supermarkets have perfected, U.S. immigration authorities today will begin using a digital inventory control system to keep tabs on millions of foreign visitors who enter the country with visas. Instead of bar codes and scanners that shopkeepers use to track cereal boxes, the government will take digital fingerprints and photos to register visitors as they arrive in the United States, and eventually to confirm their departure.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Immigration and Naturalization Service, seeking to close gaps exploited by the Sept. 11 hijackers, said Monday it will sharply reduce the length of time many foreign students and millions of other travelers may spend in the United States. INS Commissioner James W. Ziglar said his agency was seeking "the appropriate balance" between enforcing the law and welcoming legitimate visitors.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The annual visa lottery--perhaps the strangest ritual in all of U.S. immigration policy--will begin next month, sparking millions of entries from foreigners who will buck long odds for a chance to start life anew in America. Its very existence is a reminder that, even after the Sept. 11 attacks, the United States keeps its door open to newcomers more than do most other nations, and that the dream of life here continues to stir people from all over the world.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
Cristina, an illegal immigrant living in South Tucson, recently went to a government office to sign up her children for a state-run Medicaid program. The boy and girl, ages 7 and 3, respectively, are U.S. citizens and entitled to the benefits. But Cristina, who spoke on condition her last name not be used, was fearful. She'd heard of a new state law requiring public workers to alert Immigration and Customs Enforcement when illegal immigrants apply for benefits they are not legally entitled to. So when workers asked Cristina, 32, for identification, she fled.
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