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Steven A Hawley

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April 9, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Charles F. Bolden, 43, who served as a combat pilot with the Marine Corps in Vietnam, knows exactly what he will be doing as the world's most pampered piece of hardware is lifted slowly out of the shuttle Discovery's payload bay this week. "I will just sit there and hold my breath," says a man who flew more than 100 missions over Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
April 9, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Charles F. Bolden, 43, who served as a combat pilot with the Marine Corps in Vietnam, knows exactly what he will be doing as the world's most pampered piece of hardware is lifted slowly out of the shuttle Discovery's payload bay this week. "I will just sit there and hold my breath," says a man who flew more than 100 missions over Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
October 18, 1986 | United Press International
Five astronauts who flew aboard the shuttle Columbia in January will participate in a practice countdown aboard the shuttle Atlantis next month, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said Friday. Seven rookie astronauts also will take part in two days of emergency escape drills to practice procedures that would be required in the event of a pre-launch emergency. Atlantis was taken to launch pad 39B last week for seven weeks of tests.
NEWS
January 4, 1986 | United Press International
The crew of the twice-delayed shuttle Columbia flew to the Kennedy Space Center from Houston Friday for the start of the countdown to blast off Monday on the first of 15 flights planned for 1986. Columbia's countdown was scheduled to begin at 1 a.m. today and, if all goes well, the rebuilt space shuttle will thunder away from Earth at 4:05 a.m. PST Monday for a five-day mission. Landing is scheduled for early next Saturday at the Kennedy Space Center. On board will be Cmdr. Robert L.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | from United Press International
Countdown clocks resumed ticking Saturday for the shuttle Discovery's delayed launch Tuesday to boost the $1.5-billion Hubble Space Telescope into orbit. Engineers also readied the shuttle Columbia for rollout to its launch pad today for a May flight. Discovery's carefully scripted countdown began on time at 3 p.m. The ship's five-member crew is set to blast off at 5:31 a.m.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | from United Press International
The shuttle Discovery's crew flew back to Florida on Sunday for blastoff Tuesday on a critical flight to carry the $1.5-billion Hubble Space Telescope into orbit, 14 days late because of hydraulic problems. "Well, here we are again!" Discovery skipper Loren J. Shriver said shortly after the crew arrived. "We feel very confident that things are going to go well this time."
NEWS
December 21, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Technicians installed work platforms around Columbia's engine section Friday so that they could examine a faulty rocket-steering unit that halted the countdown 15 seconds before liftoff and delayed the flight until Jan. 4. Jim Ball, a spokesman for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, said some in-place testing would be done before the unit is removed today in the efforts to find the source of the problem.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The much-delayed launch of the Hubble Space Telescope was back on track Monday, and officials expected the space shuttle Discovery to blast off at around 5:31 a.m. PDT today. "The astronomers are starting to tingle again," Lennard A. Fisk, chief scientist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, said Monday.
NEWS
January 18, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Hoping to salvage a vital scientific mission in March, NASA on Friday passed up a landing opportunity in California on the outside chance of landing the space shuttle Columbia in Florida this morning. At stake is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's most important effort to study Halley's comet. Columbia is scheduled to blast off March 6 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on the first of several planned flights of an ultraviolet observatory called Astro.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A large thunderstorm prevented Air Force Col. Eileen Collins and her astronaut crew of four from blasting off on space shuttle Columbia early today. It was the second launch delay this week. Launch director Ralph Roe made the call. "Due to the storm that is moving to the south, we need to scrub for the day." "Eileen, we gave it our best shot, but the storm didn't agree with us," Roe radioed Collins. "We best give it another try another day."
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Rain and fog in Florida kept the luckless shuttle Columbia from landing Thursday, and NASA said conditions might not be much better today, raising the possibility that the ship might be diverted to California. "OK, well, I guess it's one of those things," said Cmdr. Robert L. Gibson when informed of his craft's predicament.
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