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Steven A Rosenberg

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988
A $200,000 award for pioneering work in cancer therapy will be presented to Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of the surgical branch of the National Cancer Institute, it was announced by the Hammer Prize Foundation. Dr. Armand Hammer, who is chairman of the President's Cancer Panel, will give the special Hammer Cancer Prize for Adoptive Immunotherapy to Rosenberg at a luncheon Tuesday at the Westwood headquarters of Occidental Petroleum Corp.
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BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
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NEWS
October 8, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key federal advisory committee Monday approved experimental use of gene therapy in attempts to develop a "cancer vaccine" that would immunize patients against their own tumors. The National Institutes of Health Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee sanctioned the proposal by Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, who is considered a pioneer in human gene-therapy cancer research.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key federal advisory committee Monday approved experimental use of gene therapy in attempts to develop a "cancer vaccine" that would immunize patients against their own tumors. The National Institutes of Health Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee sanctioned the proposal by Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, who is considered a pioneer in human gene-therapy cancer research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea of using human genes to treat diseases, virtually science fiction just two decades ago, may soon become medicine's newest hope for battling cancer and other life-threatening, even incurable disorders. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health are about to embark on a series of dramatic new experiments involving the use of genes that could usher in a new era in medicine and transform the outlook for many such critical conditions. The go-ahead came last week, when Dr. Steven A.
BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
The first cancer therapy using genetically altered living cells was approved last week, and doctors at the National Institutes of Health said the first patient should start treatment within a few weeks. Steven A. Rosenberg said his team has been poised to start the revolutionary gene therapy in patients critically ill with advanced melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, and was only awaiting the final approval from the Food and Drug Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health are seeking permission to genetically engineer human white blood cells and, for the first time, return the engineered cells to the donors' bodies. The cells would be labeled with a marker gene that would allow the researchers to identify the cells and monitor the course of cancer therapy. The proposal was made by Dr. Steven A.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A new form of cancer immunotherapy may result in a more potent and potentially less toxic treatment for patients with advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can spread throughout the body, government researchers say. Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg and his colleagues at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
A federal scientific advisory panel, which earlier this month approved the first experiments involving the transfer of genetically altered cells into humans, Monday rejected a proposal to establish an outside review committee to consider the social and ethical implications of such research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea of using human genes to treat diseases, virtually science fiction just two decades ago, may soon become medicine's newest hope for battling cancer and other life-threatening, even incurable disorders. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health are about to embark on a series of dramatic new experiments involving the use of genes that could usher in a new era in medicine and transform the outlook for many such critical conditions. The go-ahead came last week, when Dr. Steven A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988
A $200,000 award for pioneering work in cancer therapy will be presented to Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of the surgical branch of the National Cancer Institute, it was announced by the Hammer Prize Foundation. Dr. Armand Hammer, who is chairman of the President's Cancer Panel, will give the special Hammer Cancer Prize for Adoptive Immunotherapy to Rosenberg at a luncheon Tuesday at the Westwood headquarters of Occidental Petroleum Corp.
OPINION
September 15, 1996
Since the end of the Cold War, U.S. scientists have had to knock on corporate doors for the research funds once lavished on them by a government eager to maintain American technological dominance. The resulting corporate-academic partnership has produced research projects of considerable value, but not without sometimes generating bitter conflict between scientists and business.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1986 | DANIEL AKST, Times Staff Writer
In what appears to be the first patent suit involving gene-splicing technology, a Thousand Oaks firm is asking a federal judge to overturn the only U.S. patents issued for a promising new anti-cancer substance called interleukin-2. The suit was filed by Amgen in U.S. District Court in San Francisco against Cetus Corp., an Emeryville, Calif., firm that holds the patents. Cetus supplied the drug, also known as IL-2, used by Dr. Steven A.
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