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Steven Bailey

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1987
Wilson's article made some valid and worthwhile points. However, Hollywood won't really be doing its job unless or until it quits pandering to the youth market and presents more mature attitudes about sex. Spike Lee's film "She's Gotta Have It" says more about the hazards of casual sex, and says it better, than a dozen informational primers on AIDS. STEVEN BAILEY Culver City
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NATIONAL
July 6, 2008 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Like generations of family before him, Steven Bailey grew up with tobacco. The leafy plants thrive in Virginia's rich clay soil, and one of his earliest memories is of watching his mother work the fields, surrounded by plants as high as her shoulders.
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NATIONAL
July 6, 2008 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Like generations of family before him, Steven Bailey grew up with tobacco. The leafy plants thrive in Virginia's rich clay soil, and one of his earliest memories is of watching his mother work the fields, surrounded by plants as high as her shoulders.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1987
Wilson's article made some valid and worthwhile points. However, Hollywood won't really be doing its job unless or until it quits pandering to the youth market and presents more mature attitudes about sex. Spike Lee's film "She's Gotta Have It" says more about the hazards of casual sex, and says it better, than a dozen informational primers on AIDS. STEVEN BAILEY Culver City
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | Gregory Crouch
'HELLO, CENTRAL': Orange County's most infamous new export is a cellular telephone wired to make free phone calls. Police call it the Bailey phone after Kenneth Steven Bailey, the Laguna Niguel man indicted for allegedly inventing it. He denies any responsibility. . . . The Bailey phone, which has cost the industry more than $135 million in lost revenue, is a must-have among drug dealers calling Colombia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
The Riverside County Grand Jury has returned an indictment against three former Riverside Community College administrators charged with constructing a scheme that diverted more than $1 million in state funds to their own educational consulting business.
NEWS
October 23, 1987
Former Republican state Sen. John Briggs of Fullerton, author of California's 1978 death penalty initiative, has been charged with illegally shooting a deer in rural El Dorado County, authorities reported. Briggs, his son and son-in-law, who also were charged, were found in possession of an untagged deer by state Department of Fish and Game officers, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1987 | United Press International
Former state Sen. John Briggs (R-Fullerton) has been charged with illegally shooting a deer. Briggs, his son and son-in-law, who were also charged, were found in possession of an untagged deer on an El Dorado County ranch by officers following an anonymous tip, Duane Johnston, patrol chief for the state Department of Fish and Game, said Wednesday. They are scheduled to appear in Placerville Justice Court on Nov. 16.
OPINION
November 15, 1987
Bravo to Carol Tavris for her column ("Method Is All but Lost in the Imagery of Social-Science Fiction," Op-Ed Page, Nov. 1) on self-proclaimed "scientific" sexologist Shere Hite. I was incredibly put off by the Hite quote that was smeared across the View (Oct. 29) front page: "We (women) can still truly love a man, but we see him as from another planet." If a male author had made that statement about women, he would probably now be wearing an ill-fitting suit of tar and feathers. I'm not the most enlightened man on this planet, but I'm pretty tired of hearing what a disgusting gender I belong to. Why is that all the women can turn their lives into little "Mary Tyler Moore Shows" by complaining how men have done them wrong, while the men who have been hurt by women are expected to conceal their feelings as stoically as Clint Eastwood?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988
I enjoyed Pat McGilligan and Mark Rowland's article on critics' assessment of 1987 movies ("Film Critics Agree: 1987 Was a Good, Bad Year," Jan. 24). However, please allow me to be one of those "odd fellow" critics to which they referred, just for a moment. Movies such as "Ishtar" and "A Prayer for the Dying" got what they deserved, but why did they have to pick on the New York Times' Vincent Canby for raving about Les Blank's documentary "Gap-Toothed Women"? I have the feeling that McGilligan and Rowland never saw this film and judged it just from the title.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1985 | Maria L. La Ganga \f7
The mother of a 22-year-old man lost at sea last October has filed a wrongful-death suit against Catalina Passenger Service Inc., charging that the company's negligence caused the death of her son. The woman's son, Norman Kevin Sagona, was an experienced seaman who worked for the company, which operates a Newport Beach-to-Avalon ferry.
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