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Steven Banks

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
"Everyone, at some point in their lives, has stood in front of the mirror and pretended they were Al Jolson or Frank Sinatra or the Beatles or Michael Jackson," noted Steven Banks. "You did it--I know you did. I did, and I'm still doing it." "Steven Banks' Home Entertainment Center" (in its seventh month at the Chamber Theater in Studio City), is about "a person who knows how to procrastinate," said the 31-year-old entertainer. It starts out in the morning; he's late for work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2008
IN PAUL DAVIDSON'S article about the re-creating of the iconic Indiana Jones hat and costume ["Indiana Jones & the Lost Hat," by Paul Davidson, May 10], why is there no mention made of the person who originally created and designed the "classic costume" in the first place, Deborah Nadoolman Landis? Please, give credit where credit is due. Steven Banks Glendale
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1987 | RAY LOYND
The beguiling, inventive "Steven Banks' Home Entertainment Center," which enjoyed an 11-month run last year, is back again but in a slightly expanded form. The one-man comedy (at Theatre III in the Richmond Shepard complex) is now a more fully developed play, not so much the performance piece it was before. To be sure, writer/performer Banks is as much a singular whirlwind as ever, jumping around his grungy apartment fantasizing a galaxy of rock 'n' rollers.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS does have a wild and crazy side. Though best known for its high-brow documentaries, British dramatic series, nature shows and arts programming, PBS did introduce American audiences to the zany British comedy series "Monty Python's Flying Circus." PBS' latest find: Steven Banks, a lanky baby boomer with a quirky sense of humor. A man prone to breaking into imitations of Rex Harrison, Bob Dylan and Katharine Hepburn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1994 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the Inner Child within us has been found, released and sanctified in the public discourse and across the TV talk-show spectrum, will Steven Banks be its icon? What else could explain PBS' decision to unveil its "first scripted original comedy" that features a thirtysomething character stuck in pre-adolescence?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The street is quiet and tidy, the house quaint and tasteful. But the man emerging from the front door--sporting wild hair, black leather jacket and T-shirt depicting '50s bondage queen Betty Page--is none of these things. He is Penn Jillette, the larger (6-foot-6) and louder half of popular magic/comedy team Penn & Teller. "Steven said to try and convince you this was my house," he says in his booming, slightly gravelly voice, "but I knew you wouldn't go for that."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2008
IN PAUL DAVIDSON'S article about the re-creating of the iconic Indiana Jones hat and costume ["Indiana Jones & the Lost Hat," by Paul Davidson, May 10], why is there no mention made of the person who originally created and designed the "classic costume" in the first place, Deborah Nadoolman Landis? Please, give credit where credit is due. Steven Banks Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1989 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Outside, the world is a series of threatening figures. A demanding boss, an eager girlfriend, a landlord impatient with the noise of rock 'n' roll drum practice. Inside, the world is a rocker's dream, a toyland, an improvised recreation center. Such is the bifurcated world of Steven Banks, who, in his "Steven Banks Home Entertainment Center," which premieres tonight at 9:30 on Showtime, reprises the show that has earned glowing notices both in Los Angeles and San Francisco (where this one was taped)
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS does have a wild and crazy side. Though best known for its high-brow documentaries, British dramatic series, nature shows and arts programming, PBS did introduce American audiences to the zany British comedy series "Monty Python's Flying Circus." PBS' latest find: Steven Banks, a lanky baby boomer with a quirky sense of humor. A man prone to breaking into imitations of Rex Harrison, Bob Dylan and Katharine Hepburn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1989 | DON WALLER
Like many a bouncing baby-boomer, Steven Banks, star of the "Steven Banks Home Entertainment Center" one-man play, and Penn Jillette, one half of the Penn & Teller magic team, wanna be R O C S T A R S Sort of. After all, these guys would never stoop so low as to play their fantasies straight. The dynamic duo played a very hip late set on Monday at the Santa Monica Improv, where their threw-the-looking-glass approach to rock yielded an ode to the thrift-shop mode called "Dead People's Clothes," a white middle-class blues about backyard barbecues, and "Give Peace a Chance" as a Pizza Hut jingle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1994 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the Inner Child within us has been found, released and sanctified in the public discourse and across the TV talk-show spectrum, will Steven Banks be its icon? What else could explain PBS' decision to unveil its "first scripted original comedy" that features a thirtysomething character stuck in pre-adolescence?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The street is quiet and tidy, the house quaint and tasteful. But the man emerging from the front door--sporting wild hair, black leather jacket and T-shirt depicting '50s bondage queen Betty Page--is none of these things. He is Penn Jillette, the larger (6-foot-6) and louder half of popular magic/comedy team Penn & Teller. "Steven said to try and convince you this was my house," he says in his booming, slightly gravelly voice, "but I knew you wouldn't go for that."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1989 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Outside, the world is a series of threatening figures. A demanding boss, an eager girlfriend, a landlord impatient with the noise of rock 'n' roll drum practice. Inside, the world is a rocker's dream, a toyland, an improvised recreation center. Such is the bifurcated world of Steven Banks, who, in his "Steven Banks Home Entertainment Center," which premieres tonight at 9:30 on Showtime, reprises the show that has earned glowing notices both in Los Angeles and San Francisco (where this one was taped)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1989 | DON WALLER
Like many a bouncing baby-boomer, Steven Banks, star of the "Steven Banks Home Entertainment Center" one-man play, and Penn Jillette, one half of the Penn & Teller magic team, wanna be R O C S T A R S Sort of. After all, these guys would never stoop so low as to play their fantasies straight. The dynamic duo played a very hip late set on Monday at the Santa Monica Improv, where their threw-the-looking-glass approach to rock yielded an ode to the thrift-shop mode called "Dead People's Clothes," a white middle-class blues about backyard barbecues, and "Give Peace a Chance" as a Pizza Hut jingle.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
Will success spoil Steven Banks? The riotously funny Banks, master procrastinator and the ultimate cocooner, has returned to town with his "Steven Banks' Home Entertainment Center" after a year of kudos in San Francisco that climaxed with the taping of his own Showtime special. This time, he's at the Pasadena Playhouse Balcony Theatre. For the uninitiated, Steven Banks plays Steven Banks, a 33-year-old who has extended his adolescence to the breaking point.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Times were when Steven Banks padded on stage in his slippers and robe at Hollywood's 33-seat Chamber Theatre and spent the evening arguing with an unseen guard dog, wearing gorilla suits, rocking with Elvis and Dylan, fending off phone calls from his boss, mounting assaults with miniature cowboys and Indians and baking real chocolate chip cookies--which were later distributed (still warm) to happy patrons on their way out. That was 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Times were when Steven Banks padded on stage in his slippers and robe at Hollywood's 33-seat Chamber Theatre and spent the evening arguing with an unseen guard dog, wearing gorilla suits, rocking with Elvis and Dylan, fending off phone calls from his boss, mounting assaults with miniature cowboys and Indians and baking real chocolate chip cookies--which were later distributed (still warm) to happy patrons on their way out. That was 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
Will success spoil Steven Banks? The riotously funny Banks, master procrastinator and the ultimate cocooner, has returned to town with his "Steven Banks' Home Entertainment Center" after a year of kudos in San Francisco that climaxed with the taping of his own Showtime special. This time, he's at the Pasadena Playhouse Balcony Theatre. For the uninitiated, Steven Banks plays Steven Banks, a 33-year-old who has extended his adolescence to the breaking point.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1987 | RAY LOYND
The beguiling, inventive "Steven Banks' Home Entertainment Center," which enjoyed an 11-month run last year, is back again but in a slightly expanded form. The one-man comedy (at Theatre III in the Richmond Shepard complex) is now a more fully developed play, not so much the performance piece it was before. To be sure, writer/performer Banks is as much a singular whirlwind as ever, jumping around his grungy apartment fantasizing a galaxy of rock 'n' rollers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
"Everyone, at some point in their lives, has stood in front of the mirror and pretended they were Al Jolson or Frank Sinatra or the Beatles or Michael Jackson," noted Steven Banks. "You did it--I know you did. I did, and I'm still doing it." "Steven Banks' Home Entertainment Center" (in its seventh month at the Chamber Theater in Studio City), is about "a person who knows how to procrastinate," said the 31-year-old entertainer. It starts out in the morning; he's late for work.
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