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Steven Berkoff

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Most men on location in Acapulco, filming something as mindless as "Rambo II," would probably spend their off hours with a margarita or a Magdalena on the beach, or drowning the bad taste by bellying up to a bar and letting it go at that. But Steven Berkoff isn't most men and he doesn't let things go. So he wrote a play instead--not about the making of "Rambo II," but about the extras and bit players and blow-hards with whom he traded chatter at the bar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By David Ng
Hold your RSVPs to the Geffen Playhouse's revival of Harold Pinter's "The Birthday Party. " The highly anticipated production, staged by Oscar-winning director William Friedkin, has been abruptly called off only two weeks before its official opening. Leaders at the Geffen said that the production has been postponed to an unspecified future date. The cause of the postponement was the sudden departure of British actor Steven Berkoff, with accounts differing as to whether he resigned voluntarily or was effectively dismissed from the production.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The subtitle is "A Masterclass in Evil," so it's not like you're expecting Wilford Brimley, or Mr. Rogers. Make way for Mr. Evil, villain-for-hire Steven Berkoff, the actor with the gargoyle's voice and the blazing eyes, the man who puts the tense in intensity, for whom the concept of over-the-top has, in fact, no known top. Berkoff's entertaining if somewhat monomaniacal new solo piece goes by the name "Shakespeare's Villains," now in a monthlong engagement at the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Whoever is ultimately at fault in the conflict between actor Steven Berkoff and director William Friedkin that led to the postponement of the Geffen Playhouse's much anticipated production of “The Birthday Party,” there's no denying that the botched handling of the situation was a loss for the Geffen, the artistic company and Los Angeles theater. I was looking forward to reencountering this early Pinter classic more than almost any other production this season. The last revival I saw was ages ago off-Broadway, the Classic Stage Company's astringent 1989 production with Jean Stapleton and David Strathairn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1992
Like John Steppling and Athol Fugard, Steven Berkoff's playwriting process includes the directing of his own work, shaping its style on stage as well as on page. In all these cases, it's fascinating to see other directors tackle further productions. Brian D. Scott's guidance of the Powerhouse's production of Berkoff's "Lunch" shows not only the one-act's durability, but his own firm grasp on the play's structure, tempos and rhythms.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
As a performer, British director-playwright Steven Berkoff is an odd mix of brilliant mime, bawdy vaudevillian and obnoxious child. A really obnoxious child. Best known here for staging his long-running "Kvetch" at the Odyssey Theatre, Berkoff's adaptations of Kafka, Aeschylus and Poe and his direction of Shakespeare plays have garnered him an international reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles has been good to Steven Berkoff. The edgy British actor-playwright-director, best known for his virulent portraits of working-class anomie, has staged many of his plays here--including "Acapulco," "East" and the long-running "Kvetch," all at the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble. But he's almost unknown as a thespian. In fact, although Berkoff is a popular staple of the British stage, he's been on the boards only once in L.A., in "Decadence" in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Whoever is ultimately at fault in the conflict between actor Steven Berkoff and director William Friedkin that led to the postponement of the Geffen Playhouse's much anticipated production of “The Birthday Party,” there's no denying that the botched handling of the situation was a loss for the Geffen, the artistic company and Los Angeles theater. I was looking forward to reencountering this early Pinter classic more than almost any other production this season. The last revival I saw was ages ago off-Broadway, the Classic Stage Company's astringent 1989 production with Jean Stapleton and David Strathairn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
"We are beset by an array of problems that don't always sit and wait in the queue in your mind to be solved, but are liable at any instant to jump out of line and shout for your attention, even though in the meantime your present task may be ruined." So wrote Steven Berkoff in the program for "Kvetch," his long-running and turbulently funny hit at the Odyssey in West Los Angeles. My task, the other night, was to assess the current cast of "Kvetch."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE
Anyone who has been stumped by the work of Steven Berkoff--its bombast, its outrageousness, its virulence, its scatology--might find the Sunday 3 p.m. edition of "The South Bank Show" on Bravo cable (repeated May 29 at 7 p.m. and 12:30 a.m.) a guide to understanding this extreme iconoclast.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
The upcoming revival of Harold Pinter's "The Birthday Party" at the Geffen Playhouse has been abruptly called off only two weeks before its official opening. Leaders at the Geffen said that the production, which was to have been directed by William Friedkin, has been postponed to an unspecified future date. "The Birthday Party" was to have starred Tim Roth in the lead role of a piano player living in a seaside boarding house. The production was scheduled to open Feb. 12, with preview performances beginning on Feb. 4, and run through March 16.  The Geffen declined to elaborate on the postponement, but Friedkin said in an interview that it was due to the departure of actor Steven Berkoff and the inability to find a suitable replacement in the available time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The subtitle is "A Masterclass in Evil," so it's not like you're expecting Wilford Brimley, or Mr. Rogers. Make way for Mr. Evil, villain-for-hire Steven Berkoff, the actor with the gargoyle's voice and the blazing eyes, the man who puts the tense in intensity, for whom the concept of over-the-top has, in fact, no known top. Berkoff's entertaining if somewhat monomaniacal new solo piece goes by the name "Shakespeare's Villains," now in a monthlong engagement at the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1997 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Berkoff, dressed in drag in his play "Massage," looks like an aging alligator. He's supposed to be a British housewife who earns extra change in the sex trade, working at a dubious massage parlor. But any client who took one look at this "masseuse," with her oily mien and smug glances, would probably run in the other direction. Not that Berkoff is going for realism here. "Massage," at the Odyssey Theatre, is a highly stylized cartoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
As a performer, British director-playwright Steven Berkoff is an odd mix of brilliant mime, bawdy vaudevillian and obnoxious child. A really obnoxious child. Best known here for staging his long-running "Kvetch" at the Odyssey Theatre, Berkoff's adaptations of Kafka, Aeschylus and Poe and his direction of Shakespeare plays have garnered him an international reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles has been good to Steven Berkoff. The edgy British actor-playwright-director, best known for his virulent portraits of working-class anomie, has staged many of his plays here--including "Acapulco," "East" and the long-running "Kvetch," all at the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble. But he's almost unknown as a thespian. In fact, although Berkoff is a popular staple of the British stage, he's been on the boards only once in L.A., in "Decadence" in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1992
Like John Steppling and Athol Fugard, Steven Berkoff's playwriting process includes the directing of his own work, shaping its style on stage as well as on page. In all these cases, it's fascinating to see other directors tackle further productions. Brian D. Scott's guidance of the Powerhouse's production of Berkoff's "Lunch" shows not only the one-act's durability, but his own firm grasp on the play's structure, tempos and rhythms.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1997 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Berkoff, dressed in drag in his play "Massage," looks like an aging alligator. He's supposed to be a British housewife who earns extra change in the sex trade, working at a dubious massage parlor. But any client who took one look at this "masseuse," with her oily mien and smug glances, would probably run in the other direction. Not that Berkoff is going for realism here. "Massage," at the Odyssey Theatre, is a highly stylized cartoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
The upcoming revival of Harold Pinter's "The Birthday Party" at the Geffen Playhouse has been abruptly called off only two weeks before its official opening. Leaders at the Geffen said that the production, which was to have been directed by William Friedkin, has been postponed to an unspecified future date. "The Birthday Party" was to have starred Tim Roth in the lead role of a piano player living in a seaside boarding house. The production was scheduled to open Feb. 12, with preview performances beginning on Feb. 4, and run through March 16.  The Geffen declined to elaborate on the postponement, but Friedkin said in an interview that it was due to the departure of actor Steven Berkoff and the inability to find a suitable replacement in the available time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Most men on location in Acapulco, filming something as mindless as "Rambo II," would probably spend their off hours with a margarita or a Magdalena on the beach, or drowning the bad taste by bellying up to a bar and letting it go at that. But Steven Berkoff isn't most men and he doesn't let things go. So he wrote a play instead--not about the making of "Rambo II," but about the extras and bit players and blow-hards with whom he traded chatter at the bar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Walking through the airy lobby of the Odyssey Theatre, Steven Berkoff looks like he is ready for a fight. Short-statured and athletic, wearing garish warm-up pants popular with bodybuilders and a sleeveless black jacket, Berkoff suggests an urban warrior looking for turf violators. Yet as he lopes toward the theater space where his new play, "Acapulco," opens today, the British writer-director-actor is softly solicitous of a friend who has just finished watching a rehearsal.
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