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Steven Biko

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1997
Re "S. Africa Officers May Seek Amnesty in Biko Slaying," Jan. 28: I'm sorry, murder is murder. Torture, torture. If compromise is mandated as South Africa rebirths itself as a progressive nation, its Truth and Reconciliation Commission must deal responsibly with the thugs who killed black resistance movement leader Steve Biko and countless others. Whitewashing these killers of their crimes sends the wrong message to warmongers of all persuasions. To offer clemency to the murderers of Biko blurs the constraints of sensible social conventions.
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NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A South African prosecutor said he is considering whether to bring murder charges against police in the 1977 beating death of anti-apartheid leader Steve Biko. South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission rejected amnesty for three officers who interrogated Biko. Another has since died, and a fifth was denied amnesty in December. The officers' prosecution would likely reignite passions about a man who became synonymous with resistance to apartheid.
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NEWS
January 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Four former policemen have claimed responsibility for the death of Black Consciousness Movement leader Steven Biko, said South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The disclosures, in applications for amnesty from the commission, confirmed earlier reports by newspapers and legal sources. Biko, 30, died of untreated head injuries in a Pretoria prison Sept. 12, 1977. The lawyer for five policemen involved in the case said four officers had applied for amnesty and a fifth had made
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1997
Re "S. Africa Officers May Seek Amnesty in Biko Slaying," Jan. 28: I'm sorry, murder is murder. Torture, torture. If compromise is mandated as South Africa rebirths itself as a progressive nation, its Truth and Reconciliation Commission must deal responsibly with the thugs who killed black resistance movement leader Steve Biko and countless others. Whitewashing these killers of their crimes sends the wrong message to warmongers of all persuasions. To offer clemency to the murderers of Biko blurs the constraints of sensible social conventions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A South African anti-apartheid group has withdrawn its threat to boycott "Cry Freedom," Sir Richard Attenborough's new film about Black Consciousness movement leader Steven Biko. The Azanian People's Organization (AZAPO) said that after discussions with the British film maker, it was satisfied that the film doesn't distort the goals of the movement or Biko, who died in police custody in 1977. An AZAPO spokesman said that Attenborough had made great efforts to authenticate material for the film.
NEWS
January 30, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four former security policemen claim that they did not intend to kill anti-apartheid leader Steven Biko when they beat him in an interrogation two decades ago, their lawyer said Wednesday. The four retired officers, plus a fifth who intends to confess, hope to win political amnesty from South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission in exchange for full confessions of their roles in one of the country's most infamous abuses under apartheid.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
While hundreds around her make war, Saira Essa is making theater. Essa, 29, founder and director of the Upstairs Theatre in Durban, South Africa, was in town recently as part of a State Department educational exchange, to meet and be met--and make known her artistic credo: "With the South African situation as it is now," she said in a cultured, articulate voice, "people like myself have decided we're going to use theater as a means to fight for freedom.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A South African prosecutor said he is considering whether to bring murder charges against police in the 1977 beating death of anti-apartheid leader Steve Biko. South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission rejected amnesty for three officers who interrogated Biko. Another has since died, and a fifth was denied amnesty in December. The officers' prosecution would likely reignite passions about a man who became synonymous with resistance to apartheid.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
South African police pulled "Cry Freedom" from South African theaters in July, and now the government has also banned the film's sound track.
NEWS
January 30, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four former security policemen claim that they did not intend to kill anti-apartheid leader Steven Biko when they beat him in an interrogation two decades ago, their lawyer said Wednesday. The four retired officers, plus a fifth who intends to confess, hope to win political amnesty from South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission in exchange for full confessions of their roles in one of the country's most infamous abuses under apartheid.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Four former policemen have claimed responsibility for the death of Black Consciousness Movement leader Steven Biko, said South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The disclosures, in applications for amnesty from the commission, confirmed earlier reports by newspapers and legal sources. Biko, 30, died of untreated head injuries in a Pretoria prison Sept. 12, 1977. The lawyer for five policemen involved in the case said four officers had applied for amnesty and a fifth had made
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A South African anti-apartheid group has withdrawn its threat to boycott "Cry Freedom," Sir Richard Attenborough's new film about Black Consciousness movement leader Steven Biko. The Azanian People's Organization (AZAPO) said that after discussions with the British film maker, it was satisfied that the film doesn't distort the goals of the movement or Biko, who died in police custody in 1977. An AZAPO spokesman said that Attenborough had made great efforts to authenticate material for the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
While hundreds around her make war, Saira Essa is making theater. Essa, 29, founder and director of the Upstairs Theatre in Durban, South Africa, was in town recently as part of a State Department educational exchange, to meet and be met--and make known her artistic credo: "With the South African situation as it is now," she said in a cultured, articulate voice, "people like myself have decided we're going to use theater as a means to fight for freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2000 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 1977 and Rep. Ron Dellums (D-Berkeley) and his family have gotten quite a jolt: They've just met the South African foreign exchange student who's to be their house guest for the next four months. They're black, she's white, and she's as shocked as they are. "We assumed African meant black African; she assumed congressman meant white congressman. We assumed wrong," Dellums says. What happens from there is a surprisingly compelling new Disney Channel movie, "The Color of Friendship."
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
South African journalist Donald Woods says the United States suffers from a "cult of conservative selfishness" that propels "salesmen" into public office. Woods, who wrote the biography of anti-apartheid activist Steven Biko, gave the keynote address Saturday on the Boston campus of the University of Massachusetts. Woods, who lived in exile for 12 years, said American economic sanctions against his homeland contributed in part to Nelson R. Mandela's release.
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