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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1994 | Rick Du Brow
Eyebrows were raised in the TV industry when ABC signed Steven Bochco to a 10-series deal in 1987. For one thing, most producers fail more than they succeed--it's the nature of TV. For another, Bochco was best known for the most expensive kind of shows--hourlong dramas such as "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law"--so ABC's financial risk was even greater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1994 | Rick Du Brow
Eyebrows were raised in the TV industry when ABC signed Steven Bochco to a 10-series deal in 1987. For one thing, most producers fail more than they succeed--it's the nature of TV. For another, Bochco was best known for the most expensive kind of shows--hourlong dramas such as "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law"--so ABC's financial risk was even greater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | RICK DU BROW
With two groundbreaking series, "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law," producer Steven Bochco took TV drama in new directions in the 1980s, broke taboos, liberated the storytelling form and had a major impact on film making. "Hill Street Blues" had the most influence. Created by Bochco and Michael Kozoll, it came about when Fred Silverman, then president of hard-pressed NBC, approached them to create a different kind of cop show. In 1981, "Hill Street Blues" exploded into the public consciousness and became the rock on which NBC built its climb to the top. "Hill Street Blues" was a fast-moving, ensemble show that mixed drama with comedy touches as it interwove multiple stories of the personal and professional lives of big-city cops with blunt, gritty, often shocking realism.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989 | RICK DU BROW
With two groundbreaking series, "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law," producer Steven Bochco took TV drama in new directions in the 1980s, broke taboos, liberated the storytelling form and had a major impact on film making. "Hill Street Blues" had the most influence. Created by Bochco and Michael Kozoll, it came about when Fred Silverman, then president of hard-pressed NBC, approached them to create a different kind of cop show. In 1981, "Hill Street Blues" exploded into the public consciousness and became the rock on which NBC built its climb to the top. "Hill Street Blues" was a fast-moving, ensemble show that mixed drama with comedy touches as it interwove multiple stories of the personal and professional lives of big-city cops with blunt, gritty, often shocking realism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1987
When I moved to Los Angeles several years ago, I vowed never to pay for the chance to act or be seen. But now that I've read that Barbara Claman is qualified to teach nursery school, and Steven Bocho is concerned about the struggling actor's tax return, I just can't figure out what I was afraid of. Who needs professional integrity? Heck, who needs talent? Just find me a full checking account and let's see who I can buy this week. STEVE BRADY Los Angeles
NEWS
December 16, 1990
I cannot believe "Cop Rock" is going off the air. It is the most original, exciting program to come along in years and ABC is not giving it a chance. Everyone complains about programs being the same old thing. No one wants to chance a new format. Yet a proven winner like Steven Bocho gives us a new "Hill Street Blues" with great music and stories and it's given only a token try. Come on ABC. . . don't let originality die in TV. Dick Tucker, Newport Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON
Television viewers called the cops last week, as ABC's "NYPD Blue" and CBS' revival of "Cagney & Lacey" scored huge numbers, according to the weekly A.C. Nielsen report released Tuesday. The No. 4 ranking of the gritty police drama helped ABC to another win in the weekly race among the four networks. David Caruso's departure last Tuesday propelled the program to its highest rating in its two seasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Director Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List" and New Zealand director Jane Campion's "The Piano," both widely lauded by film critics, led the 51st annual Golden Globe Awards nominations announced Wednesday. Each film is nominated in six categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1988
Here are nominees for the 40th annual Emmy Awards, announced Thursday by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences: COMEDY SERIES: "Cheers," NBC; "Frank's Place," CBS; "The Golden Girls," NBC; "Night Court," NBC; "The Wonder Years," ABC. DRAMA SERIES: "Beauty and the Beast," CBS; "L.A. Law," NBC; "St. Elsewhere," NBC; "thirtysomething," ABC.
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