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Steven C Clemons

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BUSINESS
February 10, 1992 | Cristina Lee, Times Staff Writer
U.S.-Japanese relations are once again being tested. Remarks by Japanese leaders alleging inferior U.S. workers and products--views widely held in Japan but rarely spoken publicly--have inflamed many Americans. Steven C. Clemons said the controversy may pass but will resurface unless fundamental changes occur in the bilateral relationship. Clemons, who runs a 6,000-member trade group from Los Angeles and Costa Mesa, discussed future U.S.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 1992 | Cristina Lee, Times Staff Writer
U.S.-Japanese relations are once again being tested. Remarks by Japanese leaders alleging inferior U.S. workers and products--views widely held in Japan but rarely spoken publicly--have inflamed many Americans. Steven C. Clemons said the controversy may pass but will resurface unless fundamental changes occur in the bilateral relationship. Clemons, who runs a 6,000-member trade group from Los Angeles and Costa Mesa, discussed future U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1985
I applaud former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger's attempt (Opinion, Oct. 6) to recast the U.S.-Japan trade imbalance in terms of divergent cultural and political realities. However, after delving into Japanese factional politics, Kissinger throws up his hands in frustration and states that their political system is just too complex, too murky, too different for the United States to constructively deal with on trade issues. He reinforces this by suggesting that the United States specify "an overall total (of goods)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1985
I applaud former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger's attempt (Opinion, Oct. 6) to recast the U.S.-Japan trade imbalance in terms of divergent cultural and political realities. However, after delving into Japanese factional politics, Kissinger throws up his hands in frustration and states that their political system is just too complex, too murky, too different for the United States to constructively deal with on trade issues. He reinforces this by suggesting that the United States specify "an overall total (of goods)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1988
I have recently taken interest in the 20-year war between Occidental Petroleum and drilling foe activists in the Pacific Palisades. At minimum, the issues involved are murky and complicated, but what does emerge rather simply from the controversy is Occidental's disregard for the concern of a substantial number of Los Angeles citizens. As a great philanthropist and international do-gooder, Hammer is doing much now to earn the enmity of his own fellow residents in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1994
I had to laugh (through my tears) at Steven C. Clemons' Op-Ed piece (April 10) about deep-seated political corruption in Japan that led, he contends, to the resignation of Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa. Here's the comic relief: "The key issue for Japan is that none of its current leaders matured in a clean political system. They are powerful because they built the best political machines, raised the most money and secured the greatest amount of government resources to return to their constituents.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pulse of U.S.-Japan relations, weakened by years of trade friction, is still in good shape but could be revitalized if the economies of the two countries were restructured, a top Japanese diplomat said Wednesday. "Responsibility is on both sides," said Kiyohiko Arafune, Japan's newly appointed consul general for Southern California, Arizona and New Mexico. "This means Japan must consume more and the United States must produce more."
BUSINESS
February 21, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the continuing battle over U.S.-Japanese trade, American consumers still show a strong preference for Japanese products and their buying habits are unlikely to change any time soon, according to findings of a survey released Wednesday. The nationwide survey, conducted by the Chicago research firm Market Facts Inc., also found that a growing number of U.S. blue-collar workers--who traditionally have favored U.S. products more than their white-collar counterparts--are emerging as buyers or potential buyers of Japanese goods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese-owned companies in Orange County, stung by what they perceive as growing anti-Japanese sentiment among consumers as well as criticism from their own American workers, are joining efforts to rebuild their sagging image. Already coping with volatile issues of international trade during an election year, executives at many of the 160 Japanese companies in Orange County say they now face questions from their own employees about inflammatory comments made in Japan.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
This weekend, Japan--the country with the second-largest economy and one of the largest military budgets in the world--will hold its first parliamentary election in four years. Wake me when it's over. It's hard to get excited about Japan these days. Its politics are predictable and soporific, its economy can't shake off stagnation and its leadership seems moribund. Asia offers many truly compelling stories, but they are all elsewhere.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2009 | Paul Richter
The spoils go to the victors in politics, and usually a candidate's campaign advisors are generously rewarded with top jobs in the government when an election is won. The exception has been President Obama's team of campaign foreign policy advisors, who have fared poorly in the new administration's frantic job competition. The president, who ran as a liberal, has filled out his government with appointees more in the political center.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
All the polarizing political dynamics of George W. Bush's presidency condensed into a single illuminating episode Thursday, as the Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted to advance the nomination of John R. Bolton. Like so many of Bush's initiatives, the nomination of the blustery Bolton as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations energized conservatives, outraged Democrats and squeezed moderates in both parties.
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