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Steven Chen

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BUSINESS
December 24, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Christmas came a bit early this year for supercomputer designer Steve Chen. On Tuesday, the soft-spoken 43-year-old engineer, who dreams of designing the world's fastest computer, announced that industry giant IBM had agreed to back his fledgling $100-million venture. Chen boasts that it's a sure-win combination that will produce a supercomputer unlike any other. "We have great design capabilities," Chen said of Supercomputer Systems, his 3-month-old company in Eau Claire, Wis.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Supercomputer Venture: Steve Chen and former employees of his failed Supercomputers Systems Inc. announced a new supercomputer venture just one day after abandoning efforts to keep his company alive. Chen said the new company will seek to create the world's fastest computer. "In our attempt to save SSI, we found a number of potential investors who were interested in our team and our shared vision," Chen said. The new company, SuperComputers International of Eau Claire., Wisc.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
IBM Stops Funding Supercomputer Project: IBM said it has halted funding of a daring project by designer Steve Chen to build the most powerful mainframe computer in the world. Chen, who reportedly is seeking new funding for his Eau Claire, Wis.-based Supercomputing Systems Inc., had been working for five years to develop a mainframe to compete with the most powerful Cray Computer Corp. machines. Chen formerly worked at Cray. International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
If you looked behind the glare of publicity at recent events in the supercomputer business, you could learn a lot about how companies and nations achieve and maintain technological leadership. Challenge and response, the late, great historian Arnold Toynbee would call it. Others would simply call it competition. The publicity surrounded Cray Research Corp., the Minneapolis company founded in 1972 by Seymour Cray, a brilliant engineer and original thinker, who left Control Data Corp.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
If you looked behind the glare of publicity at recent events in the supercomputer business, you could learn a lot about how companies and nations achieve and maintain technological leadership. Challenge and response, the late, great historian Arnold Toynbee would call it. Others would simply call it competition. The publicity surrounded Cray Research Corp., the Minneapolis company founded in 1972 by Seymour Cray, a brilliant engineer and original thinker, who left Control Data Corp.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A Rosemead man was killed when his car collided with a pickup truck in Los Alamitos, police said today. Steven Chen, 25, died at Long Beach Memorial Hospital at 7:04 p.m. Thursday about two hours after he was airlifted by helicopter from the crash scene. Los Alamitos Cpl. Rod McKenzie said initial investigations revealed that Chen attempted to make a left turn as he was leaving work on Los Vaqueros Circle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990 | DAVAN MAHARAJ
A Rosemead man was killed when his car collided with a pickup truck in Los Alamitos, police said Friday. Steven Chen, 25, died at Long Beach Memorial Hospital at 7:04 p.m. Thursday, about two hours after he was airlifted by helicopter from the crash scene. Los Alamitos Police Cpl. Rod McKenzie said an initial investigation determined that Chen tried to make a left turn as he was leaving his workplace on Los Vaqueros Circle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990
A Camarillo High School junior won first place in the regional finals of the California Citizen Bee held Saturday. The competition--which included high school students from the San Fernando Valley, the Westside and Ventura and Santa Barbara counties--was one of seven held throughout Southern California on Saturday. Nearly 300 students from 94 high schools participated in the seven competitions, which were sponsored by The Times.
HEALTH
July 10, 2000
Thank you for your article "A Far Different Pharmacy" (June 26). As a faculty member at a school of pharmacy and clinical pharmacy practitioner, I have been involved in developing and overseeing numerous pharmacist-run disease management services for the last decade. While I agree that some community drug store pharmacists are entering the patient care arena for primarily financial reasons, as referred to often in your article, there are many pharmacists in a variety of health care settings (e.g.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990
A Camarillo High School junior won first place in the regional finals of the California Citizen Bee held Saturday for high school students. The competition--which included students from the San Fernando Valley, the Westside and Ventura and Santa Barbara counties--was one of seven held throughout Southern California Saturday. Nearly 300 students from 94 high schools participated in the seven competitions, which were sponsored by The Times.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Christmas came a bit early this year for supercomputer designer Steve Chen. On Tuesday, the soft-spoken 43-year-old engineer, who dreams of designing the world's fastest computer, announced that industry giant IBM had agreed to back his fledgling $100-million venture. Chen boasts that it's a sure-win combination that will produce a supercomputer unlike any other. "We have great design capabilities," Chen said of Supercomputer Systems, his 3-month-old company in Eau Claire, Wis.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
"As for the judgment of the trial court," appellate Judge Arthur Gilbert ruled, "we'll spell it out: A-F-F-I-R-M-E-D." Gilbert, of the 2nd District state Court of Appeal, on Wednesday was upholding a lower court's decision against Leonard McDonald of Thousand Oaks, who contended that his son was robbed of a spelling bee championship. McDonald claimed that his son, Gavin, then 13, lost the 1987 Ventura County Spelling Bee because officials of the sponsoring Ventura Star Free Press allowed two students from Los Altos School in Camarillo to advance to the spell-off instead of just one. In the Camarillo contest, Los Altos student Victor Wang had spelled H-O-R-S-Y and Steven Chen had spelled it H-O-R-S-E-Y.
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