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Steven Chu

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NEWS
October 16, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A UCLA chemist and Stanford University physicist were roused from sleep Wednesday morning with news that all scientists dream of: They had won Nobel prizes. UCLA's Paul D. Boyer won a share of the chemistry prize for discovering the molecular machinery of the "three-cylinder engine" that turns sunlight into energy powering virtually all living things.
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NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
Energy Secretary Steven Chu firmly pushed back against Republican allegations that political favoritism and bureaucratic incompetence led his agency to approve a $535-million loan guarantee to Solyndra, in a much-anticipated appearance by the highest level Obama administration member so far before congressional investigators looking into the failed solar equipment maker. A Nobel-prize-winning physicist and Washington outsider, Chu remained as unflappable as any seasoned Washington politico while parrying often-repetitive questions for more than four hours from the oversight subcommittee of the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee.  During his testimony, Chu made clear that he had little hope of recovering most of the money backed by the Energy Department's guarantee.  Republicans have insisted that Solyndra received more than half a billion in federal loan guarantees because its biggest investors are backed by a major Obama campaign donor, George Kaiser.
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NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
Energy Secretary Steven Chu firmly pushed back against Republican allegations that political favoritism and bureaucratic incompetence led his agency to approve a $535-million loan guarantee to Solyndra, in a much-anticipated appearance by the highest level Obama administration member so far before congressional investigators looking into the failed solar equipment maker. A Nobel-prize-winning physicist and Washington outsider, Chu remained as unflappable as any seasoned Washington politico while parrying often-repetitive questions for more than four hours from the oversight subcommittee of the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee.  During his testimony, Chu made clear that he had little hope of recovering most of the money backed by the Energy Department's guarantee.  Republicans have insisted that Solyndra received more than half a billion in federal loan guarantees because its biggest investors are backed by a major Obama campaign donor, George Kaiser.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Energy Secretary Steven Chu is a physicist, not a politician, but he was unflappable under attack from Republicans and refused to apologize for a $535-million loan guarantee given to now-bankrupt solar equipment maker Solyndra. In his first appearance before Congress since the Solyndra controversy broke nearly three months ago, Chu firmly pushed back against allegations that political favoritism and bureaucratic incompetence led his agency to approve the Solyndra loan guarantee. "Was there incompetence?"
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu on Tuesday restated the Obama administration’s commitment to keeping nuclear power in the mix of energy sources under development in the U.S., but declined to discuss how the evolving nuclear disaster in Japan might affect that effort. "The administration believes we must rely on a diverse set of energy sources, including renewables like wind and solar, natural gas, clean coal and nuclear power," Chu said in testimony before a House subcommittee.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2008 | Jim Tankersley, Tankersley is a writer in our Washington bureau.
President-elect Barack Obama will tap Nobel Prize-winning physicist Steven Chu as his Energy secretary and former New Jersey environmental protection commissioner Lisa Jackson as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, a senior Democrat said Wednesday. In addition, Carol Browner, a former EPA administrator, will serve as a high-level coordinator on energy issues, reporting to the president.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Don Lee, Washington Bureau
Energy Secretary Steven Chu on Tuesday restated the Obama administration's commitment to keeping nuclear power in the mix of renewable sources under development in the U.S., but treaded carefully around questions of how the nuclear disaster in Japan might affect that effort. "The administration believes we must rely on a diverse set of energy sources, including renewables like wind and solar, natural gas, clean coal and nuclear power," Chu said before a House subcommittee. "The administration is committed to learning from Japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen America's nuclear industry.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley, Tribune Washington Bureau
Engineers working to plug BP's massive oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico should have acted sooner to attempt the so-called top kill method to overpower and seal the well to boost its chances for success, Energy Secretary Steven Chu said in a recent interview. His team of government scientists has struggled since soon after the Deepwater Horizon accident to persuade BP to increase its estimates of how much oil was pouring out of the well — to up to 60,000 barrels a day now, from about 19,000 barrels previously — and to deploy more skimming ships and oil booms accordingly.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Energy Secretary Steven Chu is a physicist, not a politician, but he was unflappable under attack from Republicans and refused to apologize for a $535-million loan guarantee given to now-bankrupt solar equipment maker Solyndra. In his first appearance before Congress since the Solyndra controversy broke nearly three months ago, Chu firmly pushed back against allegations that political favoritism and bureaucratic incompetence led his agency to approve the Solyndra loan guarantee. "Was there incompetence?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
California's farms and vineyards could vanish by the end of the century, and its major cities could be in jeopardy, if Americans do not act to slow the advance of global warming, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu said Tuesday.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Don Lee, Washington Bureau
Energy Secretary Steven Chu on Tuesday restated the Obama administration's commitment to keeping nuclear power in the mix of renewable sources under development in the U.S., but treaded carefully around questions of how the nuclear disaster in Japan might affect that effort. "The administration believes we must rely on a diverse set of energy sources, including renewables like wind and solar, natural gas, clean coal and nuclear power," Chu said before a House subcommittee. "The administration is committed to learning from Japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen America's nuclear industry.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The United States remains committed to nuclear power, Energy Secretary Steven Chu said on Tuesday even as Japan sought to contain the nuclear danger at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. Speaking before a House Appropriations Committee panel that is looking at the department’s budget requests, Chu said his department had sent 34 people and 7,200 pounds of equipment to the scene of the crippled reactors from which radiation had leaked. The secretary, a Nobel Prize winner in physics, reaffirmed the administration’s position that the United States will learn from Japan’s difficulties but remained committed to safe nuclear power as part of an energy mix. “The American people should have full confidence that the United States has rigorous safety regulations in place to ensure that our nuclear power is generated safely and responsibly," Chu said.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu on Tuesday restated the Obama administration’s commitment to keeping nuclear power in the mix of energy sources under development in the U.S., but declined to discuss how the evolving nuclear disaster in Japan might affect that effort. "The administration believes we must rely on a diverse set of energy sources, including renewables like wind and solar, natural gas, clean coal and nuclear power," Chu said in testimony before a House subcommittee.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley, Tribune Washington Bureau
Engineers working to plug BP's massive oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico should have acted sooner to attempt the so-called top kill method to overpower and seal the well to boost its chances for success, Energy Secretary Steven Chu said in a recent interview. His team of government scientists has struggled since soon after the Deepwater Horizon accident to persuade BP to increase its estimates of how much oil was pouring out of the well — to up to 60,000 barrels a day now, from about 19,000 barrels previously — and to deploy more skimming ships and oil booms accordingly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
California's farms and vineyards could vanish by the end of the century, and its major cities could be in jeopardy, if Americans do not act to slow the advance of global warming, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu said Tuesday.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2009 | Janet Hook
The Senate, acting within hours of President Obama's inauguration, confirmed six of his Cabinet secretaries and his budget director Tuesday, but postponed for one day a vote on the nomination of Hillary Rodham Clinton as secretary of State. Sen.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The United States remains committed to nuclear power, Energy Secretary Steven Chu said on Tuesday even as Japan sought to contain the nuclear danger at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. Speaking before a House Appropriations Committee panel that is looking at the department’s budget requests, Chu said his department had sent 34 people and 7,200 pounds of equipment to the scene of the crippled reactors from which radiation had leaked. The secretary, a Nobel Prize winner in physics, reaffirmed the administration’s position that the United States will learn from Japan’s difficulties but remained committed to safe nuclear power as part of an energy mix. “The American people should have full confidence that the United States has rigorous safety regulations in place to ensure that our nuclear power is generated safely and responsibly," Chu said.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2009 | Janet Hook
The Senate, acting within hours of President Obama's inauguration, confirmed six of his Cabinet secretaries and his budget director Tuesday, but postponed for one day a vote on the nomination of Hillary Rodham Clinton as secretary of State. Sen.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2008 | Jim Tankersley, Tankersley is a writer in our Washington bureau.
President-elect Barack Obama will tap Nobel Prize-winning physicist Steven Chu as his Energy secretary and former New Jersey environmental protection commissioner Lisa Jackson as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, a senior Democrat said Wednesday. In addition, Carol Browner, a former EPA administrator, will serve as a high-level coordinator on energy issues, reporting to the president.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A UCLA chemist and Stanford University physicist were roused from sleep Wednesday morning with news that all scientists dream of: They had won Nobel prizes. UCLA's Paul D. Boyer won a share of the chemistry prize for discovering the molecular machinery of the "three-cylinder engine" that turns sunlight into energy powering virtually all living things.
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