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Steven Corbin

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NEWS
September 3, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Corbin, promising novelist, AIDS activist and advocate for black gay writers, has died. He was 41. Corbin, who lived and worked in Los Angeles for nearly two decades, died Thursday in New York City from complications of AIDS. His first novel, "No Easy Place to Be," published to mixed reviews in 1989, described the lives of three sisters during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s as they mingled with real-life writers Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, actor Paul Robeson and others.
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NEWS
September 3, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Corbin, promising novelist, AIDS activist and advocate for black gay writers, has died. He was 41. Corbin, who lived and worked in Los Angeles for nearly two decades, died Thursday in New York City from complications of AIDS. His first novel, "No Easy Place to Be," published to mixed reviews in 1989, described the lives of three sisters during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s as they mingled with real-life writers Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, actor Paul Robeson and others.
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BOOKS
May 21, 1989 | Gail Lumet Buckley, Buckley is the author of "The Hornes: An American Family" (Alfred A. Knopf and New American Library).
"No Easy Place to Be," purporting to be the story of the 1919-29 Harlem Renaissance (as seen through the eyes of three Harlem sisters), is a major disappointment. Instead of illuminating this fascinating time and place, Steven Corbin's first novel reduces it to the level of absurdity. The lives of the three sisters--Velma, a writer; Miriam, a nurse (and Marcus Garvey follower), and Louise, a Cotton Club dancer who passes for white--are potentially interesting. And some important questions--race consciousness, black feminism, and white patronage of black arts--are raised.
BOOKS
May 21, 1989 | Gail Lumet Buckley, Buckley is the author of "The Hornes: An American Family" (Alfred A. Knopf and New American Library).
"No Easy Place to Be," purporting to be the story of the 1919-29 Harlem Renaissance (as seen through the eyes of three Harlem sisters), is a major disappointment. Instead of illuminating this fascinating time and place, Steven Corbin's first novel reduces it to the level of absurdity. The lives of the three sisters--Velma, a writer; Miriam, a nurse (and Marcus Garvey follower), and Louise, a Cotton Club dancer who passes for white--are potentially interesting. And some important questions--race consciousness, black feminism, and white patronage of black arts--are raised.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
Steven Corbin wrote his just-published novel, "No Easy Place to Be," on a desk next to the washer and dryer in the small laundry room of his 1910 Los Feliz duplex apartment, where the phone sits on the floor and he must exert himself to answer calls. His spacious living room is bare except for an old couch facing the fireplace. In the large dining room, there's only an old cabinet and a dining table pressed against the wall.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1987
Steven M. Corbin, a partner in the firm of Corbin & Wertz, was named a director of Irvine-based Bomed Medical Manufacturing Ltd.
BOOKS
June 11, 1989
Gail Buckley complains that "(Steven) Corbin's three black male characters are lamentable in the extreme. Two are more or less homosexual. . . ." This shockingly homo-phobic statement is an example of a biased and ignorant kind of thinking that is itself much more "lamentable in the extreme" than the sexual orientation of any person, whether fictional or not. SIBYL MARSHALL LOS ANGELES
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987
Hevka Sramek, president of Bomed Medical Manufacturing Ltd. in Irvine, said the company has received a $500,000 investment for its Biotech Connection marketing subsidiary. Robert Mogadam, president of Biotech, said the new investment would help the company hire an additional 25 employees for its nationwide sales force by July. In addition, the company said Steven M.
MAGAZINE
January 1, 1989
The editors and writers of The Times have chosen some of the brightest of Southern California's rising stars to showcase in this second annual special issue of the magazine. The people profiled in the following pages already have achieved a measure of greatness in their respective fields, but they were picked to be among this select group of 89 because of their potential to achieve even greater fame and recognition.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
Steven Corbin wrote his just-published novel, "No Easy Place to Be," on a desk next to the washer and dryer in the small laundry room of his 1910 Los Feliz duplex apartment, where the phone sits on the floor and he must exert himself to answer calls. His spacious living room is bare except for an old couch facing the fireplace. In the large dining room, there's only an old cabinet and a dining table pressed against the wall.
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