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Steven D Clymer

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January 25, 1993 | JIM NEWTON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the lawyers in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial gather informally in the courthouse hallways, Justice Department attorney Barry F. Kowalski works the crowd, shaking hands, gently ribbing his rivals and trying to coax bits of information out of them. His colleague, Assistant U.S. Atty. Steven D. Clymer, is more prone to brood silently. He often stands alone, exuding intensity and concentration.
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NEWS
April 18, 1993 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
Here are some of the main figures in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial. THE JUDGE U.S. District Judge John G. Davies, 63 Appointed to the federal bench by President Ronald Reagan in 1986. Notable: Known as a moderate and independent conservative with a wry sense of humor. During the pretrial hearings he tried to balance the interests of opposing parties, and has taken it upon himself to zealously guard the jurors' privacy.
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NEWS
April 18, 1993 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
Here are some of the main figures in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial. THE JUDGE U.S. District Judge John G. Davies, 63 Appointed to the federal bench by President Ronald Reagan in 1986. Notable: Known as a moderate and independent conservative with a wry sense of humor. During the pretrial hearings he tried to balance the interests of opposing parties, and has taken it upon himself to zealously guard the jurors' privacy.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors chipped away at the testimony of Sgt. Stacey C. Koon on Thursday, but they lost a series of legal skirmishes that will keep jurors in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial from hearing evidence of Koon's past misconduct and about a manuscript in which he referred to King by a racially charged term. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies' decision to exclude an excerpt from the manuscript was a particularly sharp blow to prosecutors.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors chipped away at the testimony of Sgt. Stacey C. Koon on Thursday, but they lost a series of legal skirmishes that will keep jurors in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial from hearing evidence of Koon's past misconduct and about a manuscript in which he referred to King by a racially charged term. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies' decision to exclude an excerpt from the manuscript was a particularly sharp blow to prosecutors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Cypress man who masterminded one of the world's largest marijuana-trafficking operations was sentenced to more than 24 years in prison Friday for smuggling more than 34 tons of the drug into the country from Thailand. William E. Uhler, 40, was sentenced to 24 years and four months in prison by U.S. District Judge Consuelo B. Marshall in Los Angeles. He was convicted last December of federal charges stemming from the importation of $100 million worth of marijuana between 1985 and 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for two Los Angeles policemen convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights filed motions seeking a new trial Thursday, accusing federal prosecutors of using perjured testimony to garner guilty verdicts. The issue centers on the videotaped testimony of Officer Theodore J. Briseno from the 1992 state trial in Simi Valley of the four officers originally accused in the videotaped beating of King. Portions of the tape were shown to jurors during the closing phase of the federal trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Several Orange County residents, including a Tustin attorney, are among 12 people indicted in the alleged smuggling of at least 26 tons of marijuana to the West Coast from Southeast Asia, U.S. Atty. Robert C. Bonner announced Thursday. Federal agents said the ring transported the drug in several shiploads between 1984 and 1987, usually transferring their illicit cargo to smaller vessels before landing in San Francisco. The 30-count indictment, which also alleges several conspiracies to defraud the Internal Revenue Service and violate federal tax laws, was unsealed late Wednesday after the arrests of five of the defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Several Orange County residents, including a Tustin attorney, are among 12 people indicted in the alleged smuggling of at least 26 tons of marijuana to the West Coast from Southeast Asia, U.S. Atty. Robert C. Bonner announced Thursday. Federal agents said the ring transported the drug in several shiploads between 1984 and 1987, usually transferring their illicit cargo to smaller vessels before landing in San Francisco. The 30-count indictment, which also alleges several conspiracies to defraud the Internal Revenue Service and violate federal tax laws, was unsealed late Wednesday after the arrests of five of the defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the alleged instigators of an international, multimillion-dollar drug money laundering operation centered in the Los Angeles jewelry district has been arrested by the Federal Police in Argentina, U.S. authorities announced Thursday. The arrest of Celio Merkin, a 60-year-old Argentine national, "fills in the last loop" of Operation Polar Cap, one of the largest money-laundering investigations ever conducted by the U.S.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | JIM NEWTON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the lawyers in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial gather informally in the courthouse hallways, Justice Department attorney Barry F. Kowalski works the crowd, shaking hands, gently ribbing his rivals and trying to coax bits of information out of them. His colleague, Assistant U.S. Atty. Steven D. Clymer, is more prone to brood silently. He often stands alone, exuding intensity and concentration.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Final prosecution witnesses in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial said Monday that the defendants filed misleading police reports and understated the seriousness of King's injuries. One witness, Sgt. John Amott, was handed a copy of a police report about the incident written by Officer Laurence M. Powell. Assistant U.S. Atty. Steven D. Clymer then asked: "Did this report accurately describe what you saw in the videotape?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Lawyers for police officers convicted of beating Rodney G. King were rebuffed Thursday in their appeal of a decision that makes it likely the men will get longer prison sentences. The decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco means that Los Angeles federal Judge John G. Davies will be required to resentence former Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and former Officer Laurence M. Powell later this year, unless the U.S. Supreme Court takes up the case.
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