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Steven Dietz

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The scariest thing about Steven Dietz's docudrama on the mid-'80s rise and fall of a pack of neo-Nazis in the Pacific Northwest is that the subject hasn't dated a bit. That's because "God's Country" isn't just about the massive crime spree carried out by the group known as the Order, but the sources of racial hatred itself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Some plays are like amusement park rides, filled with enough twists, plunges and loop-the-loops to leave theatergoers breathless with delight. Steven Dietz's "Fiction," being given its West Coast premiere at the Old Globe after a prominent New York presentation, has this effect on some audience members.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | JOHN BOUDREAU
At this year's Oregon Shakespeare Festival in this bucolic town, amid performances of "Comedy of Errors" and "Henry V," theatergoers are being unnerved by a distressing play about the rise of neo-Nazism in the Pacific Northwest. Steven Dietz's "God's Country"--a mix of surrealism and headline news--is a fistful of hate made in the U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The scariest thing about Steven Dietz's docudrama on the mid-'80s rise and fall of a pack of neo-Nazis in the Pacific Northwest is that the subject hasn't dated a bit. That's because "God's Country" isn't just about the massive crime spree carried out by the group known as the Order, but the sources of racial hatred itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
Steven Dietz is rarely without an opinion. He's also rarely without some project in hand--usually writing a play or directing one, very often his own. Despite about 20 theater pieces to his name, that name still rings few bells outside theatrical circles. The blond and boyish 31-year-old, who looks as if he's spent the last 10 years racking up innings on some college baseball team, has instead spent them forging and staging scripts on the less visible resident theater circuit. Sports activity has been confined to friendly softball games with fellow playwrights.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Some plays are like amusement park rides, filled with enough twists, plunges and loop-the-loops to leave theatergoers breathless with delight. Steven Dietz's "Fiction," being given its West Coast premiere at the Old Globe after a prominent New York presentation, has this effect on some audience members.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1988
Steven Dietz's article "How to Hamstring a Playwright" (Feb. 28) should be nailed to the doors of every theater in the country and to the skulls of every artistic director, literary manager and dramaturge in those theaters. EDWARD PARONE Founding Director, New Theatre for Now, Mark Taper Forum
BOOKS
May 22, 1994
This year's PEN Center USA West Literary Award winners: Nonfiction--"President Kennedy: Profile of Power" by Richard Reeves (Simon & Schuster) Fiction--"My Horse and Other Stories" by Stacey Levine (Sun & Moon Press) Poetry--"Sesame" by Jack Marshall (Coffee House Press) Drama--"Lonely Planet" by Steven Dietz Screenplay--"Schindler's List" by Steven Zaillian Teleplay--"The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader--Murdering Mom" by Jane Anderson Journalism--"The Mathematics
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1991
A 19-year-old Santa Clarita man died Saturday after the car he was working under fell on top of him, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department reported. Steven Joseph Dietz was working on the brakes of his sister's car in the 24600 block of Valley Street when the jack failed at about 10:35 a.m., Deputy Mary Landreth said. The car pinned him, and he could not breathe, she said. After neighbors called 911, sheriff's deputies freed Dietz from under the car.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2000
* Theater. Steven Dietz's critically acclaimed romantic thriller, "Private Eyes," opens March 25 at the Old Globe Theatre's Cassius Carter Centre Stage, Simon Edison Centre for the Performing Arts, Balboa Park, San Diego. It will play Tuesdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m.; Sundays at 7 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. Ends April 30. $23 to $42. (619) 239-2255. * Dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | JOHN BOUDREAU
At this year's Oregon Shakespeare Festival in this bucolic town, amid performances of "Comedy of Errors" and "Henry V," theatergoers are being unnerved by a distressing play about the rise of neo-Nazism in the Pacific Northwest. Steven Dietz's "God's Country"--a mix of surrealism and headline news--is a fistful of hate made in the U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
Steven Dietz is rarely without an opinion. He's also rarely without some project in hand--usually writing a play or directing one, very often his own. Despite about 20 theater pieces to his name, that name still rings few bells outside theatrical circles. The blond and boyish 31-year-old, who looks as if he's spent the last 10 years racking up innings on some college baseball team, has instead spent them forging and staging scripts on the less visible resident theater circuit. Sports activity has been confined to friendly softball games with fellow playwrights.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Set in the 1980s, Steven Dietz's unwieldy "God's Country" revolves around the murder of radio talk-show host Alan Berg, his assassins' subsequent federal trial, and the death of Robert Mathews, fanatical head of the neo-Nazi group the Order during an FBI raid. Open Fist Theatre Company has revived Dietz's factually based drama at the Los Angeles Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1997
Family A screening series celebrating outstanding children's programming from around the world, the Sixth Annual International Children's Television Festival, ends at the Museum of Television & Radio with programs Saturday at 12:30 p.m. 465 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Wednesday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; Thursday, noon-9 p.m. Adults, $6; seniors, students, $4; children under 13, $3; members, free. (310) 786-1000.
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