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Steven E De Souza

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987 | Compiled by David Pecchia
Films going into production: A FISH CALLED WANDA (Prominent/MGM). Shooting in London. John Cleese writes/co-directs/stars in a look at the love-hate relationship between the Brits and the Yanks. Executive producer Steve Abbott. Producer Michael Shamberg. Directors Cleese and Charles Crichton. Also stars Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline and Michael Palin. Distributor MGM/UA Distribution Co. GORILLAS IN THE MIST (Guber-Peters/Universal/Warner Bros.). Shooting in Kenya and the U.K.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1998
"Knock Off" was absolutely horrible. I couldn't wait to see the review because I wanted to see how badly The Times would rip into it. I open up the paper to see Kevin Thomas calling this film "one of Van Damme's best" (" 'Knock Off' Is the Real Thing: Fast, Funny," Sept. 7). I disagree with almost everything that Thomas wrote about this film and I'm sure that I'm not the only one. Steven E. de Souza's script, which Thomas touts as "lean" and 'witty," is one of the worst I've ever heard, and not since Schwarzenegger in "Eraser" have lines been delivered this badly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What are Denzel Washington and John Lithgow, two of our most distinguished screen actors, doing in "Ricochet" (citywide), a hard-action thriller that opened Friday without press previews? They're giving the all-stops-out performances of their careers, that's what. As for the film, it's exploitation-picture violent, that's also for sure, but "Ricochet" is genuinely scary, suspenseful and disturbing in the best sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1998 | By KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Knock Off"--that's what TriStar would seem to be doing in opening this high-energy, high-spirited thriller Friday without press previews. The irony is that this is the kind of action adventure with real crossover appeal: It's fast, light and funny and not top-heavy with special effects and epic-scale destruction. It's a much tighter, far less outre film than Jean-Claude Van Damme and director Tsui Hark's last outing, "Double Team"--and no Dennis Rodman or Mickey Rourke on hand this time.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2000 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Discerning viewers will have a devil of a time sticking with "Possessed," an overheated scare show based on the unsettling story of good versus evil depicted in "The Exorcist." It's impossible not to draw comparisons between the intense "Exorcist" and the equally disturbing yet heavy-handed and less effective version airing Sunday on Showtime. Where the first inexorably pulled us to the edge of our seats with each harrowing scene, this new production leaves us emotionally adrift.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1998
Is it guilty conscience or merely sour grapes that I detect in Michael Bay's assertion that "the press don't like to say nice things because nice is boring" in the round-table discussion of action movies ("How Much Bigger Can the Bang Get?" by Amy Wallace, Aug. 9). The cheap childishness of this remark is only matched by the far more expensive childishness of his last production. He claims to have seen The Times' reviewer at a screening of "Armageddon" "sitting there, 600 people cheering, laughing, and he had a scowl on his face.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Bad Dreams" is a mildly diverting horror flick that marks the feature directorial debut of Andrew Fleming, a prize-winning cinema major at New York University. Alas, this Fox release isn't likely to win any more awards for Fleming, who had a hand in the script. "Bad Dreams" is not truly terrible; it's just not very exciting or original. Lovely Jennifer Rubin stars as Cynthia, the sole survivor of a cult whose members committed suicide by fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Welcome to Bedrock, a town proud of being "First With Fire." The locals eat at Roc Donald's ("Over 18 Dozen Sold"), watch George Lucas' "Tar Wars" at the drive-in, get their gas at the Chevrock station and their information via the Cave News Network. You were expecting maybe "Middlemarch"? Whatever else people say about "The Flintstones," no one will claim that a chance to make a truly great motion picture was frittered away here.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The opening credits of the new futuristic Sylvester Stallone clobber-movie "Judge Dredd" are crowded with the comic-book covers of the cartoon super-hero. That's a tip-off that we're about to see a comic-book movie. Then a windy, wordy preamble describing the apocalyptic Third Millennium world we are about to enter rolls down the screen. Just in case your comic-book appreciation skills are still in the preliterate stage, the words are intoned by James Earl Jones.
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