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Steven E Lewis

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February 2, 1995 | MATT LAIT and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County Auditor Steven E. Lewis, already under scrutiny for his role in the county's fiscal calamity, was summoned before the Board of Supervisors on Wednesday and questioned in the harshest terms yet about his knowledge and actions as the crisis developed. Supervisor Roger R. Stanton led the attack on Lewis during the board's meeting, seeking to pin the elected auditor down on what he knew of the risky investment practices of ousted Orange County Treasurer Robert L.
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NEWS
March 29, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court on Friday removed Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi from the bankruptcy-related misconduct case against Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, saying the district attorney's office has apparent conflicts of interest "so grave as to render it unlikely [Lewis] will receive fair treatment."
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NEWS
February 4, 1995 | TRACY WEBER and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County officials Friday began investigating whether more than $130 million was transferred into the county's general fund by Auditor-Controller Steven E. Lewis' office without any legal authority. The county's sudden interest in transfers that took place almost two months ago came after the state auditor's office issued a stinging report that challenged the movement of $282 million from unspecified accounts into the county's depleted general fund. Friday, county Counsel Terry C.
NEWS
March 29, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court Friday removed Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi from the bankruptcy-related misconduct case against Orange County Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, saying the district attorney's office has conflicts of interest "so grave as to render it unlikely [Lewis] will receive fair treatment."
NEWS
December 14, 1995 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding its probe into the nation's worst municipal bankruptcy, the Orange County Grand Jury accused two county supervisors and the auditor-controller of official misconduct and indicted the county's former budget director on criminal charges. The civil accusations against Board of Supervisors Chairman Roger R. Stanton, Supervisor William G. Steiner and Auditor-Controller Steven E.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR and JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two candidates, both of whom filed less than two hours before the deadline Friday, could offer serious surprise challenges to Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates and Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi in the June 5 election. Capizzi is now facing challenges from three prosecutors who work for him, including the chief deputy, who filed Friday.
NEWS
March 29, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court on Friday removed Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi from the bankruptcy-related misconduct case against Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, saying the district attorney's office has apparent conflicts of interest "so grave as to render it unlikely [Lewis] will receive fair treatment."
NEWS
March 29, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court Friday removed Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi from the bankruptcy-related misconduct case against Orange County Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, saying the district attorney's office has conflicts of interest "so grave as to render it unlikely [Lewis] will receive fair treatment."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD and MICHAEL G. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, one of three top county officials facing misconduct charges related to the bankruptcy, is asking the Board of Supervisors to increase his legal defense funding from $300,000 to $500,000. Lewis' attorneys recently informed the county that he already has accumulated $425,000 in legal bills, exceeding the $300,000 cap the Board of Supervisors reluctantly granted in May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Board of Supervisors will meet in special session Monday to consider agreements under which taxpayers would pay seven of Orange County's top lawyers to defend two supervisors and the auditor-controller against civil charges stemming from the county bankruptcy. Under the agreement, the attorneys would be paid no more than $295 an hour for their services--said by county officials to be significantly lower than the rates they normally charge.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an apparent move to force the county's embattled auditor to resign, the Board of Supervisors Tuesday rejected the elected official's request for money he sought to keep defending himself against bankruptcy-related charges. The board's 3-2 vote was a devastating setback for Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, who faces civil misconduct charges for his alleged failure to detect problems in the county treasurer's office that contributed to the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1996
The case against Orange County Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, facing willful misconduct charges in connection with the bankruptcy, was stayed by an appellate court this week, pending a hearing to determine whether Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi should be removed as prosecutor. Ellyn Garofalo, one of the lawyers who represents Lewis, said Friday that the 4th District Court of Appeals agreed to hear arguments Nov. 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD and MICHAEL G. WAGNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, one of three top county officials facing misconduct charges related to the bankruptcy, is asking the Board of Supervisors to increase his legal defense funding from $300,000 to $500,000. Lewis' attorneys recently informed the county that he already has accumulated $425,000 in legal bills, exceeding the $300,000 cap the Board of Supervisors reluctantly granted in May.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four elected officeholders who cut their salaries by 5% as a symbolic gesture to share the pain of Orange County's bankruptcy have gone back to taking their full paychecks, county officials confirmed Wednesday. Supervisors Chairman Roger R. Stanton, Supervisor William G. Steiner and Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis started taking their full pay in June when the county issued nearly $1 billion in bonds to buy its way out of bankruptcy. Clerk-Recorder Gary L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a legal setback to the three elected officials facing charges for their role in Orange County's bankruptcy, a judge ruled Friday that Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi had no conflict of interest and would remain the prosecutor in their misconduct cases. During a lengthy court hearing on the matter, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk rejected every argument advanced by attorneys for Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis and Supervisors Roger R. Stanton and William G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With their trials still months away, the three elected officials accused of failing to prevent the county's 1994 plunge into bankruptcy are nearing the $250,000 spending limits on their taxpayer-paid attorney fees, and one is already asking that the limit be doubled to $500,000. Auditor-Controller Steve E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge will rule March 25 whether to dismiss a grand jury accusation against three elected county officials. After listening to four hours of legal arguments Friday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk reserved his decision on a defense motion to throw out the civil misconduct accusations against two county supervisors and the auditor-controller. The officials--Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis and Supervisors William G. Steiner and Roger R.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
All of Orange County's judges were disqualified Wednesday from hearing bankruptcy-related misconduct cases against two supervisors and the county's auditor-controller because of the appearance of conflicts of interest. Superior Court Presiding Judge Theodore Millard said local judges who have a brewing legal battle with the county over court funding might not seem impartial in handling cases against county officials who control their purse strings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge Friday asked for a written explanation of how Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi decided to seek charges against Supervisor Roger R. Stanton, and referred to a criminal code provision that permits certain charges to be dropped "in the furtherance of justice." The unusual request came after attorneys for the three officials made their final arguments in a hearing to have Capizzi removed as prosecutor because, they contend, he had a conflict of interest in charging them.
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