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Steven Ehrlich

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NEWS
April 12, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
Eighty-five years ago, silver-prowed gondolas, piloted by gondoliers imported from Venice, Italy, were docked in the Main Lagoon and Grand Canal of "Venice in America," a fantasia carved from the tide flats of Ocean Park by developer Abbot Kinney. Colonnades mimicking the Doge's Palace lined the waterways in Kinney's Venetian fantasy, a kind of proto-Disneyland conjured on the coast of Santa Monica Bay.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Culver City architect Steven Ehrlich, 65, recently received the 2011 Maybeck Award for achievement in architecture from the American Institute of Architects California Council. The design principal of the 30-person firm Ehrlich Architects, he is also a visiting professor at USC and his work the subject of the recently published "Steven Ehrlich Houses" (Monacelli Press). Let's talk about multi cultural modernism, which is what you call your design philosophy. I would think it would be more relevant than ever as globalization continues apace.
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NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Cynthia Dea
The exhibition "34 Los Angeles Architects" at the Architecture & Design Museum displays innovative and cutting- edge designs that perhaps one day will dramatically change the cityscape. Models and large, suspended images showcase the participants' works and what they consider relevant and important to the current and future architectural scene in L.A. Participating firms include Lorcan O'Herlihy, Steven Ehrlich, Richard Meier Partners and David Lawrence Gray. -- Cynthia Dea Architecture & Design Museum 8560 Sunset Blvd.
HOME & GARDEN
June 18, 2011 | By R. Daniel Foster, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's not every home that can teach you about light. More art installation than house, really, one luminously redesigned residence on the Venice canals demands that you halt your walk and contemplate its spectral radiance. Saturated paints shift, gradate and commingle with the light. Sit and watch this home flex its wattage long enough, and you'll gain appreciation for the 2.8 million hues your eye is able to perceive. "For me, this house is the most authentic I've ever been," said owner Nely Galán of three structures she recently renovated into a single compound, largely through color.
MAGAZINE
November 28, 2004
Thank you for the wonderful article on Steven Ehrlich's home in Venice ("Casual by Design," by Barbara Thornburg, Holiday Entertaining Issue, Nov. 7). I live just down the street from Ehrlich's home. I think the house is wonderful, and I love the use of new materials, design elements and architectural interest. But since he built his towering edifice to modern architecture in the middle of our neighborhood of single-story California bungalows, we have been subjected to several film shoots or large-scale fundraising events, disrupting our lives and taking away what limited parking we have.
MAGAZINE
November 7, 2004 | Barbara Thornburg
Architect Steven Ehrlich and his wife, author and magazine editor Nancy Griffin, never get in a car on Sunday--at least not if they can help it. "We love to stay at home," Ehrlich says. "The farthest we like to go is the local farmer's market." Sundays are reserved for casual entertaining--often brunches--with family and friends. Two of Ehrlich's daughters, Julia and Onna, routinely drop by for a weekly catch-up.
MAGAZINE
February 20, 2005 | GINNY CHIEN
Growing up in Nigeria, handbag and shoe designer Onna Ehrlich was exposed to a vibrantly hued aesthetic rich in intricate craftsmanship. "I have photographs from my childhood that I look at, and you see women wearing these incredibly bright and beautiful headgear pieces," she says. "It's just stunning, like nothing else." So when Ehrlich launched her line two years ago, the colors and textures of her native country were a wellspring of inspiration. But there's more to the mix.
HOME & GARDEN
April 10, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Frontman Perry Farrell of the band Jane's Addiction has listed his longtime Venice home, and it's a real lollapalooza. Priced at $1.6 million, it was designed for the musician by local architect Steven Ehrlich, who replaced most of the original bungalow on the site with a modern, Asian-influenced house with three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 2,203 square feet of living space. A two-story barrel-vault ceiling runs the length of the building, which has an open living-dining-media room space, a loft and a rooftop terrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1997 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Goofy can be grand, too. Stretched out along a strip of sagging bungalows and gleaming new billboards, the Robertson Branch Library is a cartoon-like replica of more lofty architectural visions. Yet, somehow, it works. The little $3.3-million library is part of a long-running plan to revamp Los Angeles' dilapidated library system: Of 26 library projects included in the plan (18 are now complete), 13 are new buildings. But the Robertson Branch Library, located at 9233 Airdrome St.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Culver City architect Steven Ehrlich, 65, recently received the 2011 Maybeck Award for achievement in architecture from the American Institute of Architects California Council. The design principal of the 30-person firm Ehrlich Architects, he is also a visiting professor at USC and his work the subject of the recently published "Steven Ehrlich Houses" (Monacelli Press). Let's talk about multi cultural modernism, which is what you call your design philosophy. I would think it would be more relevant than ever as globalization continues apace.
HOME & GARDEN
April 10, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Frontman Perry Farrell of the band Jane's Addiction has listed his longtime Venice home, and it's a real lollapalooza. Priced at $1.6 million, it was designed for the musician by local architect Steven Ehrlich, who replaced most of the original bungalow on the site with a modern, Asian-influenced house with three bedrooms, two bathrooms and 2,203 square feet of living space. A two-story barrel-vault ceiling runs the length of the building, which has an open living-dining-media room space, a loft and a rooftop terrace.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Let's be honest. Nobody running a massive media company these days -- or working for one, or fleeing from one, or bravely enough trying to land a job at one -- knows quite what the future holds for the journalism business.
MAGAZINE
February 20, 2005 | GINNY CHIEN
Growing up in Nigeria, handbag and shoe designer Onna Ehrlich was exposed to a vibrantly hued aesthetic rich in intricate craftsmanship. "I have photographs from my childhood that I look at, and you see women wearing these incredibly bright and beautiful headgear pieces," she says. "It's just stunning, like nothing else." So when Ehrlich launched her line two years ago, the colors and textures of her native country were a wellspring of inspiration. But there's more to the mix.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Cynthia Dea
The exhibition "34 Los Angeles Architects" at the Architecture & Design Museum displays innovative and cutting- edge designs that perhaps one day will dramatically change the cityscape. Models and large, suspended images showcase the participants' works and what they consider relevant and important to the current and future architectural scene in L.A. Participating firms include Lorcan O'Herlihy, Steven Ehrlich, Richard Meier Partners and David Lawrence Gray. -- Cynthia Dea Architecture & Design Museum 8560 Sunset Blvd.
MAGAZINE
November 28, 2004
Thank you for the wonderful article on Steven Ehrlich's home in Venice ("Casual by Design," by Barbara Thornburg, Holiday Entertaining Issue, Nov. 7). I live just down the street from Ehrlich's home. I think the house is wonderful, and I love the use of new materials, design elements and architectural interest. But since he built his towering edifice to modern architecture in the middle of our neighborhood of single-story California bungalows, we have been subjected to several film shoots or large-scale fundraising events, disrupting our lives and taking away what limited parking we have.
MAGAZINE
November 7, 2004 | Barbara Thornburg
Architect Steven Ehrlich and his wife, author and magazine editor Nancy Griffin, never get in a car on Sunday--at least not if they can help it. "We love to stay at home," Ehrlich says. "The farthest we like to go is the local farmer's market." Sundays are reserved for casual entertaining--often brunches--with family and friends. Two of Ehrlich's daughters, Julia and Onna, routinely drop by for a weekly catch-up.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2003 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
On a shady corner of Venice, Steven Ehrlich is building a house for a rare client, one with whom he agrees completely: himself. The Culver City architect is building his own "family compound," as he calls it, and he's turning out to be the sort of client who would normally drive him nuts. Fortunately, when this client turns on a dime, Ehrlich is spinning along with him. "I always challenge myself," he says. "I go over every decision multiple times, and I'm very passionate about my own house.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Let's be honest. Nobody running a massive media company these days -- or working for one, or fleeing from one, or bravely enough trying to land a job at one -- knows quite what the future holds for the journalism business.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2003 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
On a shady corner of Venice, Steven Ehrlich is building a house for a rare client, one with whom he agrees completely: himself. The Culver City architect is building his own "family compound," as he calls it, and he's turning out to be the sort of client who would normally drive him nuts. Fortunately, when this client turns on a dime, Ehrlich is spinning along with him. "I always challenge myself," he says. "I go over every decision multiple times, and I'm very passionate about my own house.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1997 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Goofy can be grand, too. Stretched out along a strip of sagging bungalows and gleaming new billboards, the Robertson Branch Library is a cartoon-like replica of more lofty architectural visions. Yet, somehow, it works. The little $3.3-million library is part of a long-running plan to revamp Los Angeles' dilapidated library system: Of 26 library projects included in the plan (18 are now complete), 13 are new buildings. But the Robertson Branch Library, located at 9233 Airdrome St.
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