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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actors have come and gone during the nine seasons of NBC's Emmy Award-winning drama series "Law & Order," but veteran Steven Hill has remained a constant. Since the second episode, the 76-year-old Hill has played the pragmatic New York Dist. Atty. Adam Schiff. His acting career spans more than half a century. The Seattle-born Hill made his Broadway debut in 1946 in Ben Hecht's "A Flag Is Born," with Paul Muni and Marlon Brando.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2008 | Mark Lamster, Mark Lamster is writing a book on the secret political career of Peter Paul Rubens
On a fall afternoon in 1845, 800 members of the Tropical Emigration Society gathered on a field outside Oxford, England, to see their future in action. Specifically, they were there to see the prototype of a great machine -- "The Satellite," they called it -- that promised to generate "infinite wealth" and reinvent society.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2008 | Mark Lamster, Mark Lamster is writing a book on the secret political career of Peter Paul Rubens
On a fall afternoon in 1845, 800 members of the Tropical Emigration Society gathered on a field outside Oxford, England, to see their future in action. Specifically, they were there to see the prototype of a great machine -- "The Satellite," they called it -- that promised to generate "infinite wealth" and reinvent society.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actors have come and gone during the nine seasons of NBC's Emmy Award-winning drama series "Law & Order," but veteran Steven Hill has remained a constant. Since the second episode, the 76-year-old Hill has played the pragmatic New York Dist. Atty. Adam Schiff. His acting career spans more than half a century. The Seattle-born Hill made his Broadway debut in 1946 in Ben Hecht's "A Flag Is Born," with Paul Muni and Marlon Brando.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | Associated Press
A man who popped a friend's 6-inch tropical fish into his mouth as a joke died when it got stuck in his throat. Steven Hill Epperson, 36, was dead on arrival at a hospital Sunday. He put the Jack Dempsey fish in his mouth at his friend's house, and it became wedged in his airway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1992
What has amazed me more than anything else in the Clinton fiasco are the cries that his personal life is no one's business. How can anyone say that the personal character of a man who is selling himself as the leader of the Western World should not be scrutinized? If Clinton has not been loyal to his own family as a father and a husband, why should we believe him when he says he'll be loyal to the people of America? A disloyal man cannot isolate his disloyalty to his wife--disloyalty is a part of who he is. STEVEN HILL, Irvine
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1998
What a pleasure to read Susan King's interview of Steven Hill ("He Helped Make the Case for the Golden Age of Television," Nov. 14), an actor who can disappear into a character without drawing undue attention to himself. What I found missing were any references to his movie roles in the last few decades so your readers under 40 might be able to exclaim "I remember him!" Without going down his long list of credits, let me just single out his superb performance as the gruff rabbi father of Amy Irving in the Streisand-directed "Yentl."
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | SIMI HORWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST
Asked whether being black or being a woman is the more defining element for Lt. Anita Van Buren, the no-nonsense officer on "Law & Order," actress S. Epatha Merkerson, who plays the role, didn't miss a beat: "I don't think you can separate the two. Both define who the character is, and how she lives in the world. "Blacks see the world differently than whites. Women see the world differently than men. Neither is more defining than the other. And that's true for me as a person as well."
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Missouri House speaker Bob Griffin was acquitted on three bribery counts, but the Kansas City jury deadlocked on six other counts involving bribery, mail fraud and racketeering. U.S. Atty. Steven Hill said Griffin, House speaker from 1981 until January 1996, will be retried on those charges. Griffin and Michael Fisher, president of the Greater Kansas City AFL-CIO, were accused of helping steer lobbying contracts to political consultant Cathryn M. Simmons from 1992 to 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1992
"I f I Ran a Network . . . ," last Sunday's commentary by television producer Steven Bochco ("Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law") has prompted a heavy response from readers. A sampling: Why on earth would anyone want Bochco to run the networks? Just because his article made total sense and because his programs are superior to most others? LORI ZITO Manhattan Beach
OPINION
May 28, 2005
Re "The American Dream ... in Mexico," Commentary, May 20: I agree with Steven Hill that the gradual integration of the American and Mexican economies would help both countries, and maybe Canada would like to join. I know that after Ireland joined the European Union, that country changed for the better. After being under the yokes of Britain and the church, the economy took off and the country had the highest economic gains in its history. Ireland saw to it that students learned computers and to speak a second language to accommodate their European neighbors.
SPORTS
March 27, 1999
Steve Springer, give me a break! ["Holyfield Can Go Out a Winner if He Will Only Admit He Lost," March 20]. How many times have you seen an athlete, coach or manager ask the referee or umpire to change a call that worked in their or their team's favor? It's part of the sport. Holyfield didn't rig the fight or make the judges call it poorly. Don King should admit that he fixed it and/or the judges should admit that it was fixed. Holyfield did nothing wrong. He just caught a break; Lewis didn't.
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