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Steven J Hatfill

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November 18, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
A judge ordered the Justice Department to release the information it used to persuade the courts to let it search the home of ex-Army scientist Steven J. Hatfill, who was cleared in the 2001 anthrax attacks. U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth said the government's search warrants and supporting documents relating to Hatfill and his then-girlfriend should be made public. The Los Angeles Times and the New York Times asked for the materials to be released.
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NATIONAL
November 26, 2008 | David Willman, Willman writes for the Los Angeles Times.
Investigative documents unsealed Tuesday revealed provocative details behind early suspicions that led the FBI to target the wrong man in the 2001 anthrax mailings that killed five people. The misguided investigation continued for years into the original suspect, Dr. Steven J. Hatfill, who in June won a $5.8-million settlement from the FBI and the Justice Department for violating his privacy rights. On Aug. 8, the U.S.
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NATIONAL
November 26, 2008 | David Willman, Willman writes for the Los Angeles Times.
Investigative documents unsealed Tuesday revealed provocative details behind early suspicions that led the FBI to target the wrong man in the 2001 anthrax mailings that killed five people. The misguided investigation continued for years into the original suspect, Dr. Steven J. Hatfill, who in June won a $5.8-million settlement from the FBI and the Justice Department for violating his privacy rights. On Aug. 8, the U.S.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
A judge ordered the Justice Department to release the information it used to persuade the courts to let it search the home of ex-Army scientist Steven J. Hatfill, who was cleared in the 2001 anthrax attacks. U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth said the government's search warrants and supporting documents relating to Hatfill and his then-girlfriend should be made public. The Los Angeles Times and the New York Times asked for the materials to be released.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2008 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
The former Army scientist who was the prime suspect in the deadly 2001 anthrax mailings agreed Friday to take $5.82 million from the government to settle his claim that the Justice Department and the FBI invaded his privacy and ruined his career. Dr. Steven J. Hatfill, 54, who was called a "person of interest" in the case by then-Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft in 2002, said that label and repeated leaks of investigative details to the media damaged his reputation.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Biowarfare expert Steven J. Hatfill stepped up his efforts Sunday to clear his name, announcing that he has offered to provide blood and handwriting samples to the FBI and blasting Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft for calling him a "person of interest" in the government's investigation of last fall's anthrax attacks.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Steven J. Hatfill, the former Army biomedical researcher deemed a "person of interest" in the October 2001 anthrax attacks, struck back at the government Tuesday, filing a lawsuit in federal court alleging a yearlong campaign of harassment and illegal conduct against him led by Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft. In a 40-page complaint filed in U.S.
NEWS
August 15, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one knows if he is guilty. But any American who has even glanced at a newspaper or news broadcast in recent days by now knows Steven J. Hatfill's name. They may not know the details of Hatfill's sudden ascent to headline fame. But by this week, the American public knew that the FBI was investigating the bioterrorism specialist in connection with the anthrax letters that killed five and sickened at least 13 more last fall. Hatfill's is the only name they know.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2002 | LISA GETTER and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A bioterrorism specialist whose home has twice been searched for clues to last fall's anthrax killings lashed out at the FBI and publicly declared his innocence Sunday, saying he had "never ever worked with anthrax in my life." In a news conference outside his lawyer's office, Steven J. Hatfill affirmed his loyalty to America, and his horror when the tainted letters killed five people and made at least 13 others ill.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
A Frederick, Md., doctor whose apartment was searched by federal agents for a second time Thursday in the ongoing anthrax investigation was suspended from his job Friday, his attorney said. Steven J. Hatfill, 48, a former Army researcher and biochemist at Ft. Detrick, the Pentagon's top biodefense research center, has not been charged and has not been called a suspect in last fall's anthrax mailings, which killed five people, authorities said.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2008 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
The former Army scientist who was the prime suspect in the deadly 2001 anthrax mailings agreed Friday to take $5.82 million from the government to settle his claim that the Justice Department and the FBI invaded his privacy and ruined his career. Dr. Steven J. Hatfill, 54, who was called a "person of interest" in the case by then-Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft in 2002, said that label and repeated leaks of investigative details to the media damaged his reputation.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Steven J. Hatfill, the former Army biomedical researcher deemed a "person of interest" in the October 2001 anthrax attacks, struck back at the government Tuesday, filing a lawsuit in federal court alleging a yearlong campaign of harassment and illegal conduct against him led by Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft. In a 40-page complaint filed in U.S.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Biowarfare expert Steven J. Hatfill stepped up his efforts Sunday to clear his name, announcing that he has offered to provide blood and handwriting samples to the FBI and blasting Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft for calling him a "person of interest" in the government's investigation of last fall's anthrax attacks.
NEWS
August 15, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one knows if he is guilty. But any American who has even glanced at a newspaper or news broadcast in recent days by now knows Steven J. Hatfill's name. They may not know the details of Hatfill's sudden ascent to headline fame. But by this week, the American public knew that the FBI was investigating the bioterrorism specialist in connection with the anthrax letters that killed five and sickened at least 13 more last fall. Hatfill's is the only name they know.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2002 | LISA GETTER and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A bioterrorism specialist whose home has twice been searched for clues to last fall's anthrax killings lashed out at the FBI and publicly declared his innocence Sunday, saying he had "never ever worked with anthrax in my life." In a news conference outside his lawyer's office, Steven J. Hatfill affirmed his loyalty to America, and his horror when the tainted letters killed five people and made at least 13 others ill.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge held a former USA Today reporter in contempt of court as she continued refusing to identify sources for stories about a former Army scientist under scrutiny in the 2001 anthrax attacks. U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton said reporter Toni Locy defied his order in August that she cooperate with Steven J. Hatfill in his lawsuit against the government. Walton indicated that he would impose escalating daily fines until she divulged her sources, but that he would take a few more days to decide whether to postpone the penalty as she pursues an appeal.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2002 | From Associated Press
A lawyer for Dr. Steven J. Hatfill, called a "person of interest" in the investigation of the anthrax attacks, demanded Thursday that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft find the fired researcher a new job. Attorney Victor Glasberg wrote in the letter that Hatfill was fired from his job as a researcher and probably will not be able find employment because of the Justice Department's "inappropriate actions" in naming him a person of interest.
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