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Steven J Ross

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood Left and Right: How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics Steven J. Ross Oxford University Press: 512 pp., $29.95 Republicans take heart: Hollywood is not as liberal as you think. Steven J. Ross convincingly shows in "Hollywood Left and Right" that since its early days, the movie industry has been as quietly conservative as publicly liberal. After all, where did Ronald Reagan come from? Reagan may be the most successful actor-turned-politician, but Ross makes the case that his transition owes much to George Murphy and the conservative legacy built by Louis B. Mayer at MGM. Mayer was an up-from-nothing immigrant who became a titan ruling Hollywood's grandest studio back when the studio system was Hollywood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood Left and Right: How Movie Stars Shaped American Politics Steven J. Ross Oxford University Press: 512 pp., $29.95 Republicans take heart: Hollywood is not as liberal as you think. Steven J. Ross convincingly shows in "Hollywood Left and Right" that since its early days, the movie industry has been as quietly conservative as publicly liberal. After all, where did Ronald Reagan come from? Reagan may be the most successful actor-turned-politician, but Ross makes the case that his transition owes much to George Murphy and the conservative legacy built by Louis B. Mayer at MGM. Mayer was an up-from-nothing immigrant who became a titan ruling Hollywood's grandest studio back when the studio system was Hollywood.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging for the first time publicly the apparent severity of his prostate cancer, Steven J. Ross, the flamboyant chairman and co-chief executive of Time Warner Inc., will take an indefinite leave of absence from the helm of the world's largest media and entertainment company.
BOOKS
May 31, 1998 | WALTER BERNSTEIN, Walter Bernstein is a screenwriter and the author of "'Inside Out: A Memoir of the Blacklist" (Alfred A. Knopf)
It is always cheering to consider the myths that America constructs about itself. There is the enduring myth of innocence, for example, designed to show that our nation is a kind of renewable virgin, unhappily deflowered from time to time by scandal (Black Sox, "Quiz Show" or Watergate), but always bravely springing back to reassert her virtue.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Time Warner Chairman Recuperating: A spokesman for the giant media and entertainment company said that Steven J. Ross, diagnosed with prostate cancer a year ago, "made satisfactory progress in his chemotherapy treatment, so much so that he has been able to receive successful surgical treatment." Daily Variety, the Hollywood trade publication, reported that Ross underwent surgery at the USC Kenneth J. Norris Jr. Cancer Hospital and Research Institute under an assumed name.
BOOKS
May 21, 1989
For a book on labor and silent films between 1900 and 1930, I would appreciate hearing from anyone who was involved in the production of films about workers, unions, or radicals during this period; anyone who remembers seeing such films; or anyone involved in organizing the studios before 1930. I am especially interested in information concerning films by unions and socialists during this period. STEVEN J. ROSS HISTORY DEPARTMENT USC LOS ANGELES 90089-0034
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ross Memorial: More than 500 of Hollywood's top executives, stars and friends of the late Time Warner chairman Steven J. Ross gathered Tuesday on a Warner Bros. soundstage to pay tribute to Ross, who died in December after a yearlong battle with cancer. David Wolper, a high school classmate, co-produced an affectionate film that included photos from Ross' childhood. Among the dozen speakers: Barbra Streisand, Warren Beatty, Chevy Chase, Whoopi Goldberg and Clint Eastwood.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
The financial press is fond of saying "no money will change hands" when companies propose a merger by exchanging shares. But in the case of Time Inc. and Warner Communications, a check for the eye-popping sum of $50 million will be issued to Warner Chairman and Chief Executive Steven J. Ross if Warner's stock continues to trade at current levels and the merger is completed.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven J. Ross, the charismatic chairman and co-chief executive of Time Warner Inc., died Sunday in University Hospital near USC, where he had been undergoing treatment for cancer for two months. He was 65. Since November, 1991, Ross had been battling prostate cancer, first with chemotherapy and then with surgery last month at USC's Kenneth J. Norris Jr. Cancer Hospital. Close associates said they were heartened by his progress in recent weeks and expected him to travel to Scottsdale, Ariz.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Disclosing new rancor in a growing feud with its biggest shareholder, Warner Communications said Monday that Chris-Craft Chairman Herbert J. Siegel has threatened to oppose the reelection of Warner Communications Chairman Steven J. Ross and another director, Lawrence D. Buttenwieser. Five of the 15 directors are up for reelection at Warner's annual meeting June 24.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ross Memorial: More than 500 of Hollywood's top executives, stars and friends of the late Time Warner chairman Steven J. Ross gathered Tuesday on a Warner Bros. soundstage to pay tribute to Ross, who died in December after a yearlong battle with cancer. David Wolper, a high school classmate, co-produced an affectionate film that included photos from Ross' childhood. Among the dozen speakers: Barbra Streisand, Warren Beatty, Chevy Chase, Whoopi Goldberg and Clint Eastwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the opening strains of Natalie Cole singing "Unforgettable," the family of the late Time Warner Chairman Steven J. Ross staged an extraordinary memorial Thursday at Manhattan's famed Carnegie Hall, almost eight weeks after Ross' death from cancer at 65. The invited guests ranged from New York's top politicians and Hollywood executives to schoolmates of Ross' younger daughter, Nicole, who is still in elementary school.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heirs of Steven J. Ross could potentially amass one of the bigger family fortunes in America over the next decade as a result of the unusually rich terms of the late Time Warner chief's employment contract. Compensation experts estimate Ross' heirs will be paid at least $300 million before taxes over the next 10 years and possibly as much as $1 billion or more.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven J. Ross, the charismatic chairman and co-chief executive of Time Warner Inc., died Sunday in University Hospital near USC, where he had been undergoing treatment for cancer for two months. He was 65. Since November, 1991, Ross had been battling prostate cancer, first with chemotherapy and then with surgery last month at USC's Kenneth J. Norris Jr. Cancer Hospital. Close associates said they were heartened by his progress in recent weeks and expected him to travel to Scottsdale, Ariz.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Time Warner Chairman Recuperating: A spokesman for the giant media and entertainment company said that Steven J. Ross, diagnosed with prostate cancer a year ago, "made satisfactory progress in his chemotherapy treatment, so much so that he has been able to receive successful surgical treatment." Daily Variety, the Hollywood trade publication, reported that Ross underwent surgery at the USC Kenneth J. Norris Jr. Cancer Hospital and Research Institute under an assumed name.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1992 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notion of a Time Warner annual meeting without Chairman Steven J. Ross sends a shiver down the spine of some shareholders. But with the charismatic chief sidelined by prostate cancer, Time Warner executives may be privately relieved that a sideshow has materialized to distract those attending the annual gathering Thursday in Beverly Hills. Far easier to grapple with the First Amendment issues raised by the company's distribution of the controversial "Cop Killer" song than Ross' mortality.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Chris-Craft Chairman Herbert J. Siegel has moved his long-simmering feud with Warner Communications to a Delaware court, suing to gain access to a potentially embarrassing internal document about the company's dealings with a now-defunct theater linked to organized crime.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1988 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Lorimar Telepictures Chairman Merv Adelson may go into the entertainment business for himself instead of playing second fiddle to Chairman Steven J. Ross of Warner Communications after that firm completes its acquisition of Lorimar. What's more, Warner may provide cash for Adelson's venture.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging for the first time publicly the apparent severity of his prostate cancer, Steven J. Ross, the flamboyant chairman and co-chief executive of Time Warner Inc., will take an indefinite leave of absence from the helm of the world's largest media and entertainment company.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1992 | ALAN CITRON and JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For years they were fierce rivals within the high-stakes corporate worlds of Time Inc. and Time Warner in New York N.J. Nicholas Jr., the tightly wound financial expert, and Gerald M. Levin, the scholarly strategist. Nicholas gained the upper hand in early going, and he went on to become president of Time Warner. But in the end, the company's strategic interests won out.
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