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Steven Johnson

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Jim Ruland, Ruland is the author of the story collection "Big Lonesome."
The Best Technology Writing 2009 Edited by Steven Johnson Yale University Press: 224 pp., $17.95 paper In his essay "Why I Blog," Andrew Sullivan explores the etymology of "blog" (web log) and takes the reader back to the days of sail. On a ship, a log book was the place where the captain recorded the distance traveled, determined by a nautical instrument also called a log. Over time the device became obsolete, but the record remained, and "log" came to mean a book where important information was written.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Author Steven Johnson is getting his own PBS television show, “How We Got to Now.” Johnson has written eight books about science and technology, including the bestselling “Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter,” and, most recently, “Future Perfect: The Case for Progress in a Networked Age.” A six-part series, “How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson” will explain how certain inventions...
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OPINION
November 1, 1987
The editorial is correct on all counts about the significance of the recent stock market crash. Over the years, Americans and our government have heavily indulged, providing ourselves every whim or fancy desired, ignoring the long-run economic consequences of our indiscriminate buying actions. Or, if we are not digging ourselves into debt, we are instead acquiring enormous amounts of wealth at others' expense. In 1983, 1% percent of our nation's population possessed 34.3% of the wealth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Where Good Ideas Come From The Natural History of Innovation Steven Johnson Riverhead: 326 pp., $26.95 Steven Johnson's "Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation" is misnamed. Natural history was pioneered by 18th century naturalist Gilbert White, and its blend of scientific fieldwork, travel writing, physical geography and anthropology was meant to convey the majesty and intricate interdependency of God's creation. The time-traveling Johnson overshot his mark by a couple of centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Where Good Ideas Come From The Natural History of Innovation Steven Johnson Riverhead: 326 pp., $26.95 Steven Johnson's "Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation" is misnamed. Natural history was pioneered by 18th century naturalist Gilbert White, and its blend of scientific fieldwork, travel writing, physical geography and anthropology was meant to convey the majesty and intricate interdependency of God's creation. The time-traveling Johnson overshot his mark by a couple of centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Author Steven Johnson is getting his own PBS television show, “How We Got to Now.” Johnson has written eight books about science and technology, including the bestselling “Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter,” and, most recently, “Future Perfect: The Case for Progress in a Networked Age.” A six-part series, “How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson” will explain how certain inventions...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2005 | Noel Holston, Newsday
After years of being cautioned by well-meaning friends and relatives that watching so much TV was going to rot my brain and leave me drooling into a bowl of tapioca while an "Alf" rerun flickered on my antique 23-inch screen, I should be elated to hear from Steven Johnson that, on the contrary, it's making my mind sharper. Mine, yours, everybody's.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Steven JOHNSON is fascinated by brain chemistry, an attraction he traces back to a biofeedback session he participated in some years ago. Hooked up to the machine, he watched as the numbers documented precisely how much he was sweating. "I've never taken a lie detector test, but something about having a stranger ask me questions while keeping a close eye on my sweat glands put me on edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2008 | M.G. Lord, Lord's latest book is "Astro Turf: The Private Life of Rocket Science."
Although it centers on the life of Joseph Priestley, the 18th century English chemist and clergyman, Steven Johnson's "The Invention of Air: A Story of Science, Faith, Revolution, and the Birth of America" is far from a conventional biography. It is the story of Priestley's ideas -- who inspired them, whom they influenced and how they came to be.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2005 | Bob Thompson, Washington Post
There seem to be two Steven Johnsons. And at this particular moment, it's hard to believe they're the same guy. There's Steven Johnson, Swell Dad, who sits with you in his Brooklyn dining room and politely interrupts your conversation to commune with a way-cute toddler who's dashed in bearing bottled water and news from the outside world. "Hi, Rowan! Oh, thank you, that's very helpful. Was it hot outside, buddy?" he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Jim Ruland, Ruland is the author of the story collection "Big Lonesome."
The Best Technology Writing 2009 Edited by Steven Johnson Yale University Press: 224 pp., $17.95 paper In his essay "Why I Blog," Andrew Sullivan explores the etymology of "blog" (web log) and takes the reader back to the days of sail. On a ship, a log book was the place where the captain recorded the distance traveled, determined by a nautical instrument also called a log. Over time the device became obsolete, but the record remained, and "log" came to mean a book where important information was written.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2008 | M.G. Lord, Lord's latest book is "Astro Turf: The Private Life of Rocket Science."
Although it centers on the life of Joseph Priestley, the 18th century English chemist and clergyman, Steven Johnson's "The Invention of Air: A Story of Science, Faith, Revolution, and the Birth of America" is far from a conventional biography. It is the story of Priestley's ideas -- who inspired them, whom they influenced and how they came to be.
BOOKS
October 15, 2006 | Mark Coleman, Mark Coleman is the author of "Playback: From the Victrola to MP3, 100 Years of Music, Machines, and Money."
IF every great city resembles a living organism, then mid-19th century London was an ungainly and careless youthful giant with appalling personal habits. As Steven Johnson makes nauseatingly clear in the grim and gripping early pages of "The Ghost Map," the stench of human excrement was everywhere. Forget about sanitary engineering and the modern science of waste management. In the 1850s, the world's largest city didn't have a functional sewage system.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2005 | Bob Thompson, Washington Post
There seem to be two Steven Johnsons. And at this particular moment, it's hard to believe they're the same guy. There's Steven Johnson, Swell Dad, who sits with you in his Brooklyn dining room and politely interrupts your conversation to commune with a way-cute toddler who's dashed in bearing bottled water and news from the outside world. "Hi, Rowan! Oh, thank you, that's very helpful. Was it hot outside, buddy?" he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2005 | Noel Holston, Newsday
After years of being cautioned by well-meaning friends and relatives that watching so much TV was going to rot my brain and leave me drooling into a bowl of tapioca while an "Alf" rerun flickered on my antique 23-inch screen, I should be elated to hear from Steven Johnson that, on the contrary, it's making my mind sharper. Mine, yours, everybody's.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2004 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Steven JOHNSON is fascinated by brain chemistry, an attraction he traces back to a biofeedback session he participated in some years ago. Hooked up to the machine, he watched as the numbers documented precisely how much he was sweating. "I've never taken a lie detector test, but something about having a stranger ask me questions while keeping a close eye on my sweat glands put me on edge.
BOOKS
October 15, 2006 | Mark Coleman, Mark Coleman is the author of "Playback: From the Victrola to MP3, 100 Years of Music, Machines, and Money."
IF every great city resembles a living organism, then mid-19th century London was an ungainly and careless youthful giant with appalling personal habits. As Steven Johnson makes nauseatingly clear in the grim and gripping early pages of "The Ghost Map," the stench of human excrement was everywhere. Forget about sanitary engineering and the modern science of waste management. In the 1850s, the world's largest city didn't have a functional sewage system.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who said Jesus told him to run down a woman in his Chevrolet because she was black was found not guilty by reason of insanity. Judge Mark Seigel ruled that Steven Johnson, 48, suffered from diabetes-induced psychosis when he drove into Eleanor Hickerson last year as she stood at a bus stop. Hickerson, 57, was dragged nearly 100 feet before the car smashed into the side of a building. She was seriously injured.
OPINION
November 1, 1987
The editorial is correct on all counts about the significance of the recent stock market crash. Over the years, Americans and our government have heavily indulged, providing ourselves every whim or fancy desired, ignoring the long-run economic consequences of our indiscriminate buying actions. Or, if we are not digging ourselves into debt, we are instead acquiring enormous amounts of wealth at others' expense. In 1983, 1% percent of our nation's population possessed 34.3% of the wealth.
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