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Steven Knight

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
In 1998, Steven Knight was eking out a respectable living as a jack-of-all-trades in the British entertainment industry -- writing sitcom episodes and stand-up comedy for the TV company Celador, trying his hand at a film script and working on a team devising TV game shows. He could not have known that two modest projects would change his fortunes spectacularly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It sounds contrived, and it is. It sounds like a bit of a stunt, and it is that too. It may even sound boring, but that it is not. In fact, whip-smart filmmaking by writer-director Steven Knight and his team combined with Tom Hardy's mesmerizing acting make the micro-budgeted British independent "Locke" more minute-to-minute involving than this year's more costly extravaganzas. Though a dozen actors are listed in "Locke's" credits, Hardy is the only one who appears on screen in this real-time drama that unfolds inside a moving BMW during the 85 minutes it takes construction foreman Ivan Locke to make a nighttime drive from Birmingham to London.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It sounds contrived, and it is. It sounds like a bit of a stunt, and it is that too. It may even sound boring, but that it is not. In fact, whip-smart filmmaking by writer-director Steven Knight and his team combined with Tom Hardy's mesmerizing acting make the micro-budgeted British independent "Locke" more minute-to-minute involving than this year's more costly extravaganzas. Though a dozen actors are listed in "Locke's" credits, Hardy is the only one who appears on screen in this real-time drama that unfolds inside a moving BMW during the 85 minutes it takes construction foreman Ivan Locke to make a nighttime drive from Birmingham to London.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
In 1998, Steven Knight was eking out a respectable living as a jack-of-all-trades in the British entertainment industry -- writing sitcom episodes and stand-up comedy for the TV company Celador, trying his hand at a film script and working on a team devising TV game shows. He could not have known that two modest projects would change his fortunes spectacularly.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
Steven Knight and Tony Kushner won $25,000 each Thursday at the annual Humanitas Prizes, given to movie and TV writers whose scripts "entertain and enrich the viewing public." Knight won for the feature film "Dirty Pretty Things"; Kushner was honored for HBO's "Angels in America." Other winners included Barbara Hall for the pilot episode of CBS' "Joan of Arcadia" and JacQui Clay for an installment of Fox's "The Bernie Mac Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- Walden Media, which has produced 15 films based on children's books, is getting into the publishing business in conjunction with HarperCollins. The company, which has adapted such HarperCollins titles as "The Chronicles of Narnia," "Bridge to Terabithia" and "Charlotte's Web" for the screen, will be launching Walden Pond Press, acquiring and publishing books for children, the companies said Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Steven Knight, writer and first-time director of the somber action drama "Redemption," partly redeems this middling effort by attempting a brains-over-brawn approach despite the presence of ubiquitous movie tough guy Jason Statham in the lead. Unfortunately, this tale of Joey Jones (Statham), a haunted, disgraced ex-Special Forces officer living on the streets of London who befriends Sister Cristina (Agata Buzek), a wildly conflicted Polish nun, gets tripped up by a kind of forced nobility that never quite squares with the movie's sporadic mayhem.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2007 | Susan King
According to David Cronenberg, each movie dictates how much violence it needs to depict. His movies, it seems, are quite the dictators. Over the decades, the 64-year-old Toronto-based filmmaker has stretched the R rating to its maximum with such horror fests as "Rabid," "Shivers," "Scanners," "Videodrome" and "The Fly." "When I did 'The Dead Zone,' people were saying the violence is more restrained; 'It's not like his horror films,' " Cronenberg relates.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2013 | By Susan King
"Metro Manila," a thriller about a poor farmer who moves his family from the rice fields of the northern Philippines to Manila in hopes of a better life, was the big winner Sunday evening in London at the Moët British Independent Film Awards, earning honors for best film, director for Sean Ellis and achievement in production. James McAvoy was named lead actor for the crime comedy "Filth," and Lindsay Duncan won lead actress for the comedy-drama "Le Week-end. " Supporting actor honors went to Ben Mendelsohn for "Starred Up," and Imogene Poots won supporting actress for "The Look of Love.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
One of the most talked-about pictures during the fall festival trifecta of Telluride, Venice and Toronto, Jonathan Glazer's "Under the Skin" has been acquired by distributor A24. The company plans to release the film, starring Scarlett Johansson, next year. Based on the novel by Michel Faber, the film stars Johansson as an alien being who has taken human form roaming Scotland in search of victims she needs to survive. The film's unusual visual style comes from the fact that at least some of its action was shot "candid camera" style with Johansson interacting with real people; that footage mixed with scenes of her with actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By Susan King
British actor Tom Hardy, best known as Batman's nemesis Bane in “The Dark Knight Rises,” wowed audiences Monday at the Venice International Film Festival in Steven Knight's taut “Locke,” which was shown out of competition. Critics praised the 35-year-old burly actor's one-man tour de force performance. Hardy is the only person who appears onscreen; his costars, including “The Lone Ranger”s' Ruth Wilson, are just voices he speaks to on the phone, a la Ryan Reynolds' 2010 film “Buried.”  '“Locke' is basically just Tom Hardy driving a car while making a bunch of phone calls, and yet this ingenuously executed study in cinematic minimalism has depth, beauty and poise,” writes Variety's Leslie Felperin, adding it was a “finely tuned showcase” for Hardy's "exceptional acting skills.” WATCH: Trailers from Venice Hardy plays Ivan Locke, a married man with two teenage sons whose personal and professional lives  collide one evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Nigerian-born Okwe, an immigrant cabdriver hustling for customers at a London airport, knows just how to chat up potential fares abandoned by their car services. "I am here," he says with elegance and precision, "to rescue those who have been let down by the system." It is, however, one of the many ironies of the exceptional "Dirty Pretty Things" and its gripping examination of dislocation and uncertainty among that city's refugees that no one is more let down by the system than Okwe himself.
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