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Steven Kurtz

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April 25, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A judge in Buffalo, N.Y., has thrown out charges against a college art professor accused of improperly obtaining biological materials for an exhibit protesting U.S. government policies. U.S. District Judge Richard Arcara ruled this week that the 2004 mail and wire fraud indictment against Steven Kurtz, a University at Buffalo professor, was "insufficient on its face." Kurtz is a founding member of the Critical Art Ensemble, which has used human DNA and other biological materials in works intended to spotlight political and social issues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A judge in Buffalo, N.Y., has thrown out charges against a college art professor accused of improperly obtaining biological materials for an exhibit protesting U.S. government policies. U.S. District Judge Richard Arcara ruled this week that the 2004 mail and wire fraud indictment against Steven Kurtz, a University at Buffalo professor, was "insufficient on its face." Kurtz is a founding member of the Critical Art Ensemble, which has used human DNA and other biological materials in works intended to spotlight political and social issues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2004 | Louise Roug
Over the course of a single day, Steven Kurtz, a 46-year-old art professor from Buffalo, N.Y., lost Hope, his wife of 20 years; had his house combed through by counterterrorism agents; saw his work and papers confiscated; and was targeted for investigation as a possible bioterrorist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2004 | Louise Roug
Over the course of a single day, Steven Kurtz, a 46-year-old art professor from Buffalo, N.Y., lost Hope, his wife of 20 years; had his house combed through by counterterrorism agents; saw his work and papers confiscated; and was targeted for investigation as a possible bioterrorist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989
Dan Sullivan is correct when he states that the Tony Award for best musical used to go to new shows like "West Side Story" and the best play award to shows like "A Streetcar Named Desire" ("The Tonys: An Honor in Decline," June 4). Lest anyone get the wrong impression, however, let it be known that "The Music Man" beat "West Side Story" for best musical in 1958 and "Mister Roberts" beat "Streetcar" for best play in 1948. STEVEN KURTZ Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996
A 51-year-old Woodland Hills man drowned Saturday while bodysurfing, Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies said. Steven Kurtz was apparently pulled beneath the surf at Zuma Beach about 1:50 p.m., Sgt. Tim Youngern said. His 15-year-old son looked on as lifeguards leaped into the waves and pulled Kurtz to land. A lifeguard at Zuma Beach said there were stronger than normal riptides Saturday.
NEWS
July 1, 2004
A Buffalo, N.Y., artist who was initially the target of a federal terrorism investigation was indicted Tuesday on charges that he illegally obtained potentially harmful biological materials. Also charged was a university administrator who allegedly helped him. Steven Kurtz, the artist and a University at Buffalo professor, and Robert Ferrell, chairman of the University of Pittsburgh's Human Genetics Department, were charged with wire fraud and mail fraud.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1990
Re Marshal Alan Phillips' Aug. 26 letter on limits of freedom of speech: I'm tired of letter writers misusing First Amendment doctrine to claim that speech they don't like isn't necessarily protected, citing specific exceptions that are wholly irrelevant. Mr. Phillips first trots out Justice Holmes' famous statement about how one may not falsely shout fire in a theater. This may symbolically mean freedom of speech is not absolute, but only a straw man would claim otherwise. Literally, it has no bearing on the work of artists such as Sam Kinison, Andrew Dice Clay, Public Enemy or Guns N' Roses, unless, I suppose, their words make average people panic and trample each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2004 | Louise Roug
One morning last month, art professor Steven Kurtz called 911 to report that Hope, his wife of 20 years, had died in her sleep. One of the responding paramedics noticed laboratory equipment in Kurtz's home in Buffalo, N.Y. That eventually brought FBI agents in hazardous-material suits who cordoned off the surrounding streets and evacuated nearby residents while combing through the house, seizing equipment, Kurtz's personal computer, books and papers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2008 | Carolyn Thompson, Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Artist Steven Kurtz has never been shy about challenging the establishment, using a blend of performance art and science with his Critical Art Ensemble to stir debate about such things as genetically modified crops and germ warfare. A 2007 performance had CAE members launching, with some fanfare, a harmless strain of bacteria onto volunteers in Leipzig, Germany, to re-create the U.S. military's secret 1950 mock anthrax test on San Francisco. Kurtz's latest installation is another questioning of authority -- with a personal twist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1997
Charlton Heston includes the name of the noted American physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, along with Alger Hiss and the Rosenbergs, in a list of individuals he asserts "damaged the country" (Letters, Oct. 26). Whatever the status of Hiss or the Rosenbergs, J. Robert Oppenheimer was one of the great scientific minds of this century. His insights in nuclear physics, and his skills as an administrator and director of this country's atomic research, played a pivotal role in the American victory in World War II, in recognition of which he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Merit in 1946.
OPINION
June 15, 2004
Steven Kurtz's legal nightmare began in grief last month when he awoke at his Buffalo, N.Y., home to find his wife of 20 years unresponsive. The art professor called 911 to summon paramedics, who determined that Hope Kurtz had died in her sleep of heart failure. One of the paramedics noticed laboratory equipment and petri dishes in Kurtz's home. Fearing they had stumbled onto a clandestine bioweapons lab, the paramedics called in local health department officials.
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