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Steven M Bornstein

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BUSINESS
September 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steven M. Bornstein, the driving force behind ESPN's America's Cup coverage, was picked to become president and chief executive of ESPN. Bornstein, 38, had been the network's executive vice president for two years. Roger Werner Jr. resigned as president Aug. 29 to become president and CEO of Prime Ventures Inc., a new company that will oversee several regional cable networks. "Obviously, when you get a job like this . . .
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NEWS
April 11, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Councilman Mike Feuer and Deputy Mayor Rocky Delgadillo were headed for a June 5 runoff in the race to become Los Angeles' next city attorney, election returns showed Tuesday. In the contest for city controller, Councilwoman Laura Chick appeared to be making history by becoming the first woman ever elected to a Los Angeles citywide office. Two proposed charter changes were winning approval handily: Amendment 1, to change the way police officers are disciplined, and Amendment 2, to improve pension benefits for longtime police officers and firefighters.
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SPORTS
September 11, 1990
Steven Bornstein, executive vice president the past two years, was picked as ESPN's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2001 | From Bloomberg New
Walt Disney Co., the second-largest media company, named Steven Bornstein, the former head of its Internet division, as president of ABC Television, replacing Robert Callahan. Callahan is leaving Burbank-based Disney for personal reasons that require him to be based on the East Coast, company spokesman John Dreyer said. He declined to comment further. Callahan will remain with ABC through September.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Councilman Mike Feuer and Deputy Mayor Rocky Delgadillo were headed for a June 5 runoff in the race to become Los Angeles' next city attorney, election returns showed Tuesday. In the contest for city controller, Councilwoman Laura Chick appeared to be making history by becoming the first woman ever elected to a Los Angeles citywide office. Two proposed charter changes were winning approval handily: Amendment 1, to change the way police officers are disciplined, and Amendment 2, to improve pension benefits for longtime police officers and firefighters.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2001 | From Bloomberg New
Walt Disney Co., the second-largest media company, named Steven Bornstein, the former head of its Internet division, as president of ABC Television, replacing Robert Callahan. Callahan is leaving Burbank-based Disney for personal reasons that require him to be based on the East Coast, company spokesman John Dreyer said. He declined to comment further. Callahan will remain with ABC through September.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling its determination to place the Internet at the forefront of its growth strategy, Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday appointed one of its most highly regarded executives as head of its online properties. The company said Steven Bornstein, 47, will relinquish his post as president of its ABC Inc. unit to become chairman of Buena Vista Internet Group.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1992
The San Diego State University College of Business Administration will hold its annual Business Leaders-Faculty Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Monday at the San Diego Marriott. The luncheon, the department's chief fund-raising event of the year, is an opportunity for local SDSU alumni and business leaders to demonstrate support for the university, which has been hit hard by state budget cuts. This year's luncheon speaker is Steven M.
SPORTS
December 27, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Anchorman Chris Berman, who developed a cult-like following among baseball fans through his use of contrived nicknames for players, has signed a long-term contract to remain with the ESPN sports cable network. The announcement was made today by Steven M. Bornstein, executive vice president for programming and production for ESPN; no contract details were released.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1999 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling its determination to place the Internet at the forefront of its growth strategy, Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday appointed one of its most highly regarded executives as head of its online properties. The company said Steven Bornstein, 47, will relinquish his post as president of its ABC Inc. unit to become chairman of Buena Vista Internet Group.
SPORTS
September 11, 1990
Steven Bornstein, executive vice president the past two years, was picked as ESPN's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steven M. Bornstein, the driving force behind ESPN's America's Cup coverage, was picked to become president and chief executive of ESPN. Bornstein, 38, had been the network's executive vice president for two years. Roger Werner Jr. resigned as president Aug. 29 to become president and CEO of Prime Ventures Inc., a new company that will oversee several regional cable networks. "Obviously, when you get a job like this . . .
BUSINESS
August 25, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capitulating to the demands of civil rights organizations, Walt Disney Co. publicly apologized Tuesday for its role in an "inappropriate and unacceptable" radio promotion called "The Black Hoe," but critics rejected the gesture and said they will go forward with a boycott against the Burbank firm.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gap Inc.'s gain is Walt Disney Co.'s loss, one in a series that has rattled the entertainment company's executive ranks. The announcement Thursday that Disney's theme park chief, Paul Pressler, had signed on as chief executive of the clothing retailer has again raised the issue of a brain drain at Disney. Executives have quit for a variety of reasons, depleting Disney's home-grown talent and forcing the company to continually hire executives, leaving the management ranks unsettled.
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