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Steven M Kalish

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January 26, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Robert L. Jackson, Ronald J. Ostrow and Douglas Frantz
When Steven M. Kalish flew to Panama in 1983 in his Learjet to arrange to launder millions of dollars in drug-smuggling profits, he was instructed to bring a gift for Manuel A. Noriega that was big enough to show he was serious. So when Kalish arrived at the Panamanian strongman's home in Panama City, he carried a briefcase containing $300,000 in cash. As he was leaving after a 30-minute meeting, the general reminded Kalish that he had forgotten his briefcase.
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NEWS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal prosecutors let him keep some of the millions he made in drug trafficking, a witness at the trial of former Panama strongman Manuel A. Noriega testified in Miami. Steven Kalish, 38, testified that he had made a deal with Noriega to launder his profits. He estimated that he had made $20 million as a drug trafficker. He and Noriega had just concluded a deal to handle all of the Medellin cartel's money-laundering when he was arrested in Tampa, he said.
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NEWS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal prosecutors let him keep some of the millions he made in drug trafficking, a witness at the trial of former Panama strongman Manuel A. Noriega testified in Miami. Steven Kalish, 38, testified that he had made a deal with Noriega to launder his profits. He estimated that he had made $20 million as a drug trafficker. He and Noriega had just concluded a deal to handle all of the Medellin cartel's money-laundering when he was arrested in Tampa, he said.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manuel A. Noriega, imprisoned in Miami awaiting trial on cocaine-smuggling charges, saw his legal troubles deepen Friday when his co-defendant in another drug case pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against him. Enrique (Kiki) Pretelt, a Panamanian businessman, entered a two-count felony plea in federal court in Tampa. Pretelt said that he had conspired with Noriega in 1983 and 1984 to smuggle 1.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | Douglas Frantz and Ronald J. Ostrow and Robert L. Jackson, This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Douglas Frantz, Ronald J. Ostrow and Robert L. Jackson
As early as 1972, the U.S. government was so concerned about what it saw as Manuel Noriega's role in drug trafficking in Panama that it formulated an option to assassinate him. It was no idle contingency plan: A CIA operative was actually dispatched to Mexico to await final orders before the plot was finally scotched, according to a former U.S. intelligence official.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manuel A. Noriega, imprisoned in Miami awaiting trial on cocaine-smuggling charges, saw his legal troubles deepen Friday when his co-defendant in another drug case pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against him. Enrique (Kiki) Pretelt, a Panamanian businessman, entered a two-count felony plea in federal court in Tampa. Pretelt said that he had conspired with Noriega in 1983 and 1984 to smuggle 1.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | Douglas Frantz and Ronald J. Ostrow and Robert L. Jackson, This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Douglas Frantz, Ronald J. Ostrow and Robert L. Jackson
As early as 1972, the U.S. government was so concerned about what it saw as Manuel Noriega's role in drug trafficking in Panama that it formulated an option to assassinate him. It was no idle contingency plan: A CIA operative was actually dispatched to Mexico to await final orders before the plot was finally scotched, according to a former U.S. intelligence official.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Robert L. Jackson, Ronald J. Ostrow and Douglas Frantz
When Steven M. Kalish flew to Panama in 1983 in his Learjet to arrange to launder millions of dollars in drug-smuggling profits, he was instructed to bring a gift for Manuel A. Noriega that was big enough to show he was serious. So when Kalish arrived at the Panamanian strongman's home in Panama City, he carried a briefcase containing $300,000 in cash. As he was leaving after a 30-minute meeting, the general reminded Kalish that he had forgotten his briefcase.
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