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Steven Naifeh

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory White Smith, a Harvard-trained lawyer, businessman, philanthropist and Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer who raised hackles in the art world with an intensely psychological examination of the life and work of Jackson Pollock, has died. He was 62. Smith died Thursday at his home in Aiken, S.C., of a rare brain tumor diagnosed nearly 40 years ago, said his spouse and co-author Steven Naifeh. Naifeh and Smith won the Pulitzer Prize in biography for "Jackson Pollock: An American Saga," which was published in 1990 and spurred the 2000 movie "Pollock" starring Ed Harris.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory White Smith, a Harvard-trained lawyer, businessman, philanthropist and Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer who raised hackles in the art world with an intensely psychological examination of the life and work of Jackson Pollock, has died. He was 62. Smith died Thursday at his home in Aiken, S.C., of a rare brain tumor diagnosed nearly 40 years ago, said his spouse and co-author Steven Naifeh. Naifeh and Smith won the Pulitzer Prize in biography for "Jackson Pollock: An American Saga," which was published in 1990 and spurred the 2000 movie "Pollock" starring Ed Harris.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Jackson Pollock: An American Saga," an epic biography of a troubled artist, hit the bookshops only this week, but the lines of criticism are firmly drawn. On one side are formalists who object to analyzing Pollock's art in terms of his inadequate personality and untidy life. Reviewing the book for the New York Times, Elizabeth Frank took this art-for-art-sake's point of view.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Van Gogh The Life Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith Random House: 953 pp., $40 Vincent Van Gogh is an extraordinary artist about whom everything seems to be known. His brilliant work and tragic life, combined with a paper trail of letters to his art-dealer brother, Theo, have made him an irresistible subject for art historians, biographers, journalists, filmmakers, medical specialists and psychologists since his death from a gunshot wound in 1890. The Dutch painter of dazzling landscapes and searing portraits may be permanently engraved in the public imagination as a mad, self-destructive genius, but scholars continue to probe every last detail of his 37 years on Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Van Gogh The Life Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith Random House: 953 pp., $40 Vincent Van Gogh is an extraordinary artist about whom everything seems to be known. His brilliant work and tragic life, combined with a paper trail of letters to his art-dealer brother, Theo, have made him an irresistible subject for art historians, biographers, journalists, filmmakers, medical specialists and psychologists since his death from a gunshot wound in 1890. The Dutch painter of dazzling landscapes and searing portraits may be permanently engraved in the public imagination as a mad, self-destructive genius, but scholars continue to probe every last detail of his 37 years on Earth.
BOOKS
February 25, 1990 | Artelia Court, Court is a free-lance writer.
By the time this review sees print, "Jackson Pollock: An American Saga" will have been discussed on Donahue, on lesser talk shows and on many private telephones; will have aroused the kind of mass interest not often given an artist's biography. The book itself is unprecedented. Not since the 1974 publication of Michael Holroyd's landmark, "Augustus John," has there been an account of life-in-art of this scope and scale that's also personably written.
BOOKS
December 18, 1988 | David Johnston, Johnston, a Times staff writer from 1976-88, now covers Atlantic City for the Philadelphia Inquirer. He was once a Mormon Elders Quorum president.
The Book of Mormon begins with a story of murder sanctioned by God. It is a story critical to understanding how in Mormon theology holy ends can justify what to non-believers would appear to be evil means. And the concept of holy justification for otherwise abominable conduct is at the core of these two superb books about a skilled forger and how the very top leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints became entangled with him and then tried to mislead law enforcement, the faithful and the public about their conduct.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David Ng
Daniel Day-Lewis will soon have a new role to obsessively inhabit -- recipient of an honorary doctoral degree from the Juilliard School in New York. The arts school said it also would bestow commencement honors this year on opera singer Dawn Upshaw, pianist Alfred Brendel, choreographer Ohad Naharin and jazz musician Sonny Rollins. In addition, Juilliard said it would include writer Harriet Heyman and technology venture capitalist Michael Moritz among the honorees at its commencement ceremony on May 24 at Alice Tully Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
The nominees for fiction in the 1990 National Book Awards include two first-time novelists and an 88-year-old author who completed his work in 1948 but could not find a publisher until last year. The nominees were announced today by the National Book Foundation, the nonprofit organization that sponsors the annual awards. The fiction nominees include Felipe Alfau, an 88-year-old Spanish native who immigrated to the United States during World War I.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever wonder how physicians make those "Best Doctors" lists in metropolitan magazines? Here's how Woodward/White Inc., an Aiken, S.C., research firm, came up with 99 "A-list healers" listed in Orange Coast magazine's April issue.
BOOKS
February 25, 1990 | Artelia Court, Court is a free-lance writer.
By the time this review sees print, "Jackson Pollock: An American Saga" will have been discussed on Donahue, on lesser talk shows and on many private telephones; will have aroused the kind of mass interest not often given an artist's biography. The book itself is unprecedented. Not since the 1974 publication of Michael Holroyd's landmark, "Augustus John," has there been an account of life-in-art of this scope and scale that's also personably written.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Jackson Pollock: An American Saga," an epic biography of a troubled artist, hit the bookshops only this week, but the lines of criticism are firmly drawn. On one side are formalists who object to analyzing Pollock's art in terms of his inadequate personality and untidy life. Reviewing the book for the New York Times, Elizabeth Frank took this art-for-art-sake's point of view.
BOOKS
December 18, 1988 | David Johnston, Johnston, a Times staff writer from 1976-88, now covers Atlantic City for the Philadelphia Inquirer. He was once a Mormon Elders Quorum president.
The Book of Mormon begins with a story of murder sanctioned by God. It is a story critical to understanding how in Mormon theology holy ends can justify what to non-believers would appear to be evil means. And the concept of holy justification for otherwise abominable conduct is at the core of these two superb books about a skilled forger and how the very top leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints became entangled with him and then tried to mislead law enforcement, the faithful and the public about their conduct.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
The nominees for fiction in the 1990 National Book Awards include two first-time novelists and an 88-year-old author who completed his work in 1948 but could not find a publisher until last year. The nominees were announced Thursday by the National Book Foundation, the nonprofit organization that sponsors the annual awards. The fiction nominees include Felipe Alfau, an 88-year-old Spanish native who immigrated to the United States during World War I.
BOOKS
June 11, 1989
GATES OF PARADISE by V. C. Andrews (Pocket: $5.50). The Casteel family curse claims the lives of Heaven Leigh and her husband Logan and the legacy is resumed with daughter Annie. THE TOYNBEE CONVECTOR by Ray Bradbury (Bantam: $3.95). Collection of this futurist's most recent short stories. THE RATS by James Herbert (Signet: $3.95). It's a war between humans and a race of superrodents, and the rats are winning. SWAN DIVE by Jeremiah Healy (Pocket: $3.95). Detective John Cuddy's gun is found in the hotel room of a jumper from a 12-story window.
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