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Steven Norris

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SPORTS
September 17, 1985 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
UCLA football Coach Terry Donahue turned the tables at his Monday morning briefing and opened by asking reporters to tell him who the starting quarterback should be for the Bruins' home opener Saturday against San Diego State. He passed out ballots and then tabulated the results himself. The outcome? "It's not for publication," Donahue said. "What this tells me, though, is that it's as close as I thought it was. You guys don't know the answer, either."
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SPORTS
September 17, 1985 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
UCLA football Coach Terry Donahue turned the tables at his Monday morning briefing and opened by asking reporters to tell him who the starting quarterback should be for the Bruins' home opener Saturday against San Diego State. He passed out ballots and then tabulated the results himself. The outcome? "It's not for publication," Donahue said. "What this tells me, though, is that it's as close as I thought it was. You guys don't know the answer, either."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
These days, the Gilbert and Sullivan repertory is approached in some quarters as a rather precious parlor turn, a smirking demi-theatrical in-joke rather than genuine comic opera. How nice then to encounter the honestly sung "Ruddigore" of the South Bay Light Opera Society, Friday at El Camino College's Marsee Auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2006 | Melissa Pamer, Times Staff Writer
By the time Phillip Morrow was 4, he had lived in four different foster homes. Along with his half-brother, Lemar Davis, then 5, Phillip was placed in MacLaren Children's Center, Los Angeles County's scandal-ridden shelter for foster kids, which closed in 2003. The couple who would become the brothers' adoptive parents -- Becky and Steven Norris -- came to interview Phillip and Lemar at the center. The children had been separated for months.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | LYNN SMITH, Lynn Smith is a staff writer for the Times' Life & Style section.
In "Congo," a diamond company executive in search of lost colleagues, a primatologist in search of a home for his gorilla and a Romanian explorer in search of an ancient lost city find those things and more on an expedition into the forests of Zaire. (Rated PG-13) * The critics be darned. Savvy grade-school children were well aware that adult critics didn't like this adaptation of Michael Crichton's novel--too cheesy, they said; too scary. But it worked for kids.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex, that traditional despoiler of Conservative Party politicians, is creating yet more scandals threatening Prime Minister John Major's enfeebled government. The running scandals involve sexual, political and financial peccadilloes among Tory politicians, which flatly contradict earnest, upright Major's new policy, dubbed "back to basics"--the British equivalent of the American "family values" campaign in which God, church and family are stressed.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Communist President Ramiz Alia was heading for a sound defeat today in Albania's first free election, even as his ruling party appeared on its way to victory. Unofficial returns from Sunday's election also showed Foreign Minister Muhamet Kapliani losing badly and Prime Minister Fatos Nano running neck-and-neck with a Tirana engineer from the opposition Democratic Party.
NEWS
January 9, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's hear it for the queen! Never mind scandalously divorcing children or a husband who is a prominent public malaprop. After more than four often-trying decades, the British still love their Elizabeth Regina. Asked to vote on the question "Do you want a monarchy?" in a rowdy, live television spectacular before 3,000 partisan spectators, 2.5 million viewers telephoned in responses: Among them, 66% favored the monarchy despite its foibles; the other 34% voted for a British republic.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You would think that two well-oiled machines such as Britain's Labor and Conservative parties would know how to run something as seemingly straightforward as a campaign for mayor of one of the world's great cities. Think again. The contest for London's first directly elected mayor has been a triumph of scandal and backbiting over issues, of arm-twisting over democracy. And the race is just getting started.
SPORTS
September 11, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
The NFL's Raiders, in their nastiest days, couldn't have gotten away with what Wilmington Banning High players tried last Friday night in a disheartening display of unsportsmanlike conduct during a game against Newhall Hart. The Pilots were called for eight personal fouls, including four late hits on Hart quarterback Matt Moore. Three Banning players were ejected in the 34-0 defeat. Most disturbing of all, Banning coaches didn't seem to think their players did anything wrong.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2010 | By Roger Vincent
Scattered around town are some surprisingly valuable vacant lots disguised by weeds or broken blacktop or the remains of an unwanted building -- and many have quietly come to market, thanks to the real estate collapse. Billions of dollars were lost by developers who bought land to build high-profile projects but weren't able to get their plans off the ground, even after spending lavishly on architectural designs and other measures to get their buildings approved by local officials.
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