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Steven P Jobs

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BUSINESS
February 6, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven P. Jobs revealed Monday that International Business Machines and his small, 4 1/2-year-old computer company, Next Inc., quietly entered into a sweeping licensing agreement late last year covering all patents held by both companies. The deal, which also covers any patent issued to either company over the next five years, means that neither company will be considered in violation of patents by using technology developed by the other.
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BUSINESS
October 7, 2011 | David Sarno and Jessica Guynn
Candles flickered outside Apple stores, where bouquets of flowers encircled photos of Steve Jobs. Thousands of online mourners replaced their Facebook photos with the black Apple logo. And tributes flooded in from world leaders and industry pillars, including Apple's most bitter rivals. The outpouring of sentiment -- the kind usually reserved for pop culture icons like John Lennon or Michael Jackson -- was unprecedented for a corporate executive. Why so much adoration for Jobs?
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BUSINESS
October 23, 1988
Apple Computer co-founder Steven P. Jobs unveiled this month the first computer from his new company, Next Inc. The $6,500 machine, which features a vast memory, stereo-quality sound and a high-resolution screen, is exclusively for the higher education market. For packaging several new wrinkles in technology in a single machine, the Next computer won raves from some analysts. But will the company be a commercial success? Will the computer sell?
BUSINESS
September 21, 2007 | Michelle Quinn and Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writers
Apple Inc. Chief Executive Steve Jobs has been subpoenaed to testify by the Securities and Exchange Commission in a civil stock option backdating case against Apple's former chief counsel, according to two people familiar with the case. The subpoena should not suggest that Jobs is suspected of wrongdoing, according to the people, who asked not to be identified. The subpoena is not a public record. An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1987
The breach of contract suit, filed by Steven Kitchen and Woodside Design Associates in Redwood City, Calif., accuses Apple of reneging on a 1985 oral deal to acquire Woodside, developer of a flat-panel video screen for computers. The suit claims that Woodside's agreement with founder and then-Chairman Steven P. Jobs was broken once Jobs was ousted from power in a bitter dispute with John A. Sculley, president and now chairman.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1985
Apple Computer said Deborah A. Coleman, 32, has been named vice president of manufacturing with responsibility for the Cupertino-based company's worldwide manufacturing operations. Coleman, who previously was director of manufacturing, was described by an analyst as a protege of Apple's former chairman, co-founder Steven P. Jobs. Jobs angrily resigned last month, taking five top employees with him to start a new computer venture.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1985
Steven P. Jobs, former chairman of the Cupertino, Calif.-based company, cut his stake from 5.59% in the firm that he helped found. The reduction was disclosed in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. As of last July, Jobs was Apple's largest shareholder, owning about 10% of the company's stock. Jobs resigned as chairman of the company in September.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Next Computer to Go Public: Next Computer Inc. founder Steven P. Jobs said he plans to take the 6-year-old company public sometime within the next 18 months. Jobs, who also co-founded Apple Computer, said Next should have about $60 million in sales in the fourth quarter, but he would not disclose profit levels.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2007 | Michelle Quinn and Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writers
Steve Jobs bowed to the cult of the Apple faithful. Apple Inc.'s chief executive issued a rare mea culpa Thursday for slashing the iPhone's price this week, only two months after the company's most ardent fans waited in line for hours to buy the $600 gadget. Apologizing for "disappointing" those initial buyers, he offered $100 store credits to anyone who had paid full price for the much-hyped product that combines a cellphone, a Web-surfing device and an iPod.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2007 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Not even an appearance from hype-master Steve Jobs could satisfy the craving Apple Inc. has created. Tech enthusiasts made clear Monday that they won't be happy until Apple starts selling the iPhone. Eighteen days before the much-anticipated mobile device hits store shelves, software developers and Apple fans crowded a conference center in San Francisco to see Apple's chief executive unveil features of another product: the upcoming Leopard operating system for Mac computers.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Inc. Chief Executive Steve Jobs, pressed by shareholders to detail his role in a stock option scandal, said Thursday that the issue was put to rest after a Securities and Exchange Commission probe cleared the company. "Unless you think there's a conspiracy theory involving the SEC too, I don't know what else to say," Jobs told investors at the company's annual meeting in Cupertino, Calif., where it is based.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press and Bloomberg News
Apple Inc. Chief Executive Steve Jobs received a salary of just $1 last year, documents filed Monday with the Securities and Exchange Commission said. Since returning in 1997 to the helm of the company he co-founded and catapulting Apple to record profit, the legendary Silicon Valley executive has opted to get only a token paycheck. But as of March 20, Jobs, 52, still owned more than 5.4 million restricted shares, worth about $494 million at Monday's closing price of $91.43.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Inc. Chief Executive Steve Jobs was questioned by U.S. government investigators about backdating of employee stock option grants at the company, lawyers familiar with the matter said. Jobs met with officials from the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Justice Department last week in San Francisco, said the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the interviews were confidential.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Inc. Chief Executive Steve Jobs lost a bid to demolish a Spanish Colonial Revival-style mansion he owns about 30 miles south of San Francisco. A California appeals court ruled Wednesday that Jobs and the city of Woodside, where the 17,250-square-foot mansion was built in about 1925, didn't consider alternatives to destroying the home. Jobs said he never liked the 30-room Jackling House -- named after its original owner, copper magnate Daniel C. Jackling -- which he bought 21 years ago.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS
John A. Sculley, 46, who has been Apple's president and chief executive since joining the firm in April, 1983, was elected to the additional post of chairman. The office had been vacant since Sept. 17, when Apple co-founder Steven P. Jobs left the Cupertino, Calif., company to start his own computer firm.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2006 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
Apple Computer Inc. on Friday cleared Chief Executive Steve Jobs of wrongdoing regarding its improper handling of stock options, but new details from an internal investigation only fueled controversy.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2006 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writers
Apple Computer Inc. said Wednesday that Chief Executive Steve Jobs knew the computer maker had sometimes changed the grant dates on stock options to make them more valuable -- an improper accounting practice that has tripped up more than 100 companies. Apple said a three-month internal investigation into the timing of stock option grants had resulted in the resignation of former Chief Financial Officer Fred Anderson from its board of directors. The Cupertino, Calif.
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