Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteven P Jobs
IN THE NEWS

Steven P Jobs

BUSINESS
February 10, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Jobs' dogged effort to create another first-rank computer company suffered a jolting setback Tuesday when the legendary Apple Computer co-founder announced that his Next Inc. will stop building computers to focus on its highly regarded software. Next, based in Redwood City, Calif., said it will lay off 280 of its 530 employees and will put its state-of-the-art factory in Fremont up for sale. Next said it will sell its 50-person hardware design operation to Canon Inc.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 9, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the International Business Machines personal computer was introduced 10 years ago, pundits correctly saw it as an important product that would have a profound impact on the then-nascent desktop computer business. But no one--least of all IBM itself--expected the machine to give new meaning to the word "clone," or vault a tiny software company called Microsoft to worldwide prominence, or generally rewrite the book on how to succeed in the computer business.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's taken a few years, but Steve Jobs thinks that he has finally figured out how to define his sleek but slow-selling Next computer: It's a "professional workstation," combining the power of machines used by scientists and engineers with the convenience of personal computers. Conveniently, this niche is small enough for Next to be a major player yet is growing fast enough to be worthwhile.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after launching the first Next Computer model amid a frenzy of hype--only to see it fail in the marketplace--Steven P. Jobs returned to Symphony Hall here Tuesday with a new series of products and the future of his company hanging in the balance.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's new-model season again for the two most watched, most talked about, most fussed over personal computer makers in the Silicon Valley: Apple Computer and Next Inc. But this year, new models from these two media darlings will not be mere examples of the latest and greatest of their PC technology. What's at stake is renewed corporate strength--or, in Next's case, corporate survival.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Jobs, the personal computer pioneer struggling to hit it big a second time, has landed his first major corporate deal, selling 250 of his Next workstations to the William Morris talent agency in Beverly Hills and New York. Although the $2.5-million deal isn't large by the standards of corporate America, it does represent an achievement that has proven elusive for the computer industry's most celebrated marketing whiz: acceptance of his latest computer.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven P. Jobs revealed Monday that International Business Machines and his small, 4 1/2-year-old computer company, Next Inc., quietly entered into a sweeping licensing agreement late last year covering all patents held by both companies. The deal, which also covers any patent issued to either company over the next five years, means that neither company will be considered in violation of patents by using technology developed by the other.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|