Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteven Price
IN THE NEWS

Steven Price

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Steven Price, who brought an experimental edge to the sound of "Gravity," Alfonso Cuarón's 3-D outer space disaster film, won the Oscar for original score. Full of tension and a mixture of orchestral and digital sounds, Price's score serve as one of the film's characters -- the never-ending galaxy that is the film's setting.  "Every element was manipulated through a synthesizer so that you're never sure what's organic and what's electronic," Price recently told The Times . "We were very keen to avoid the conventions of a typical action score.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Steven Price, who brought an experimental edge to the sound of "Gravity," Alfonso Cuarón's 3-D outer space disaster film, won the Oscar for original score. Full of tension and a mixture of orchestral and digital sounds, Price's score serve as one of the film's characters -- the never-ending galaxy that is the film's setting.  "Every element was manipulated through a synthesizer so that you're never sure what's organic and what's electronic," Price recently told The Times . "We were very keen to avoid the conventions of a typical action score.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013
When a movie has little dialogue and even fewer sound effects, what keeps the audience tethered emotionally to the story? And how can a film seamlessly blend the idea of death and a child's wide-eyed wonderment? Through its music, of course. Here are four composers whose work covers all of the above as well as a solemn spirituality and a playful pizazz. JOHN WILLIAMS, 'The Book Thief' After nearly a decade of composing exclusively for Steven Spielberg's often-epic films, five-time Oscar winner John Williams took on the gentle Holocaust-era drama "The Book Thief.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013
When a movie has little dialogue and even fewer sound effects, what keeps the audience tethered emotionally to the story? And how can a film seamlessly blend the idea of death and a child's wide-eyed wonderment? Through its music, of course. Here are four composers whose work covers all of the above as well as a solemn spirituality and a playful pizazz. JOHN WILLIAMS, 'The Book Thief' After nearly a decade of composing exclusively for Steven Spielberg's often-epic films, five-time Oscar winner John Williams took on the gentle Holocaust-era drama "The Book Thief.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The people who have most recently come into Steven Price's life would be amazed to learn that two years ago, this ebullient, outgoing man was virtually a shut-in. They'd find it hard to picture him spending day after day sitting in front of the television set in his pajamas--bored, lonely and depressed. Price can't see himself living like that, either. Not anymore. But there was a time when the wheelchair-bound La Habra resident didn't believe he had a choice.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1999 | Daryl Strickland
Alyn Corp., a metal composite materials maker based in Irvine, on Friday named consultant Arne van Roon president and chief executive officer. He replaces Steven S. Price, who will be departing after a year to pursue other interests. Van Roon, 54, who has been a consultant for Alyn since 1993, also will join the company's board. In 1984, he founded Van Roon Partners Ltd., which provided executive talent or capital for emerging companies.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2006 | Walter F. Roche Jr., Times Staff Writer
A Diamond Bar company headed by former Veterans Affairs Secretary Anthony J. Principi could get fees exceeding $1 billion from the VA, much of it on contracts approved and amended while he ran the agency, records show. Principi was president of the medical services company QTC Management Inc. before he joined President Bush's Cabinet in 2001. He ran the VA for four years, then returned to the firm as chairman of the board.
OPINION
June 30, 2004
Ronald Brownstein correctly points out several of the major changes in American society that occurred during the Clinton administration: welfare reform, an emphasis on work and responsibility and a balanced budget ("Clinton's Biggest Gains Not on Conservative Critics' Radar," June 28). These changes resulted in the most significant and rapid gains by the poor ever. Attributing these actions to Bill Clinton and the Democrats is truly a revisionary approach to history. Brownstein also points out that "his lack of political discipline produced a leftward drift during his first two years that helped the GOP seize Congress in 1994."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
How could a movie with a Mexican director, two American stars and the backing of a major U.S. studio be named outstanding British film at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards? That's the question on many awards observers' minds after Alfonso Cuarón's sci-fi thriller "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney and released by Warner Bros., reaped six BAFTA trophies on Sunday, among them one reserved for demonstrations of "outstanding and original British filmmaking which shows exceptional creativity and innovation.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The people who have most recently come into Steven Price's life would be amazed to learn that two years ago, this ebullient, outgoing man was virtually a shut-in. They'd find it hard to picture him spending day after day sitting in front of the television set in his pajamas--bored, lonely and depressed. Price can't see himself living like that, either. Not anymore. But there was a time when the wheelchair-bound La Habra resident didn't believe he had a choice.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
With the U.S. waging a war in Iraq that relies heavily on wireless communications, a controversial Bush administration plan to transfer valuable airwaves from the military to the mobile phone industry is coming under new scrutiny. Accommodating growing consumer demand for high-speed mobile Internet access -- as well as for ordinary cell phone calls -- is a crucial challenge for the White House.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Cynthia Townsley Willis, a retired school bus driver and grandmother of four, carries a spray bottle of marijuana-infused skin oil in her purse to treat her frequent, painful muscle spasms. Her Walther P22 pistol most often gets slipped into a shoulder holster under her jacket — driving the lonely roads that traverse the hills and dense woodlands of the Rogue Valley, who knows when she might need it? Here in the pot belt of rural southern Oregon, possibly the only thing more ubiquitous than marijuana is guns, and Willis, who is legally registered with the state as a medical marijuana user, feels better when she has both.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|