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Steven Rattner

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2010
Overhaul: An Insider's Account of the Obama Administration's Emergency Rescue of the Auto Industry. Steven Rattner Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 336 pps., $27
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BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Critics of Lawrence H. Summers, one of the leading candidates to be the next Federal Reserve chairman, point to his reputation for being difficult to work with.  But a former Obama administration economic aide who worked for Summers at the White House said he enjoyed the experience. Steven Rattner, a former investment banker who headed President Obama's auto task force in 2009, said in a New York Times opinion article Monday that although he had known Summers for years, he wasn't sure what it would be like to work with him. "Larry's vivid and sometimes strong personality has been well chronicled.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Steven Rattner, who engineered the government's bailout of the auto industry, was sued by New York state in a pension kickback case just as he settled similar federal allegations. Two lawsuits filed Thursday by New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo accuse Rattner of paying state officials to steer investment work to his former private equity firm, Quadrangle Group. The suits seek to permanently bar Rattner from the securities industry and to force him to pay at least $26 million.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
In a presidential debate over foreign policy, one of the most contentious exchanges between President Obama and Mitt Romney, surprisingly, was over Detroit. “You know, if we had taken your advice, Gov. Romney, about our auto industry, we'd be buying cars from China instead of selling cars to China,” Obama said. Obama was touting his role in the bailout of General Motors and Chrysler, which began under the Bush administration in late 2008. In a New York Times opinion article in November 2008, Romney urged the government, as the headline said, to: “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt.” “A managed bankruptcy may be the only path to the fundamental restructuring the industry needs,” Romney wrote.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
Steven Rattner, the Wall Street millionaire and relentless deal maker who led General Motors and Chrysler through bailout and bankruptcy, is leaving his post atop the government's auto task force just five months after he was handpicked for the job. "With GM's restructuring complete, Steven Rattner, whose leadership and vision were invaluable to the auto task force's efforts, has decided to transition back to private life and his family," Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner said Monday.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2009 | Dana Hedgpeth, Hedgpeth writes for the Washington Post.
Past Todd's Body Shop and a crab shack, across from a field of wheat on Route 291, hangs a modest sign for Frank B. Rhodes Jr., furniture maker since 1983. Enter the metal warehouse he uses for his office, showroom and woodworking shop, and there's nothing to let visitors know that the Eastern Shore 50-year-old is one of the few remaining heirs of Walter P. Chrysler, the founder of the auto company that is now struggling to survive.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The former head of the Obama administration's auto task force expressed optimism that General Motors and Chrysler would rebound and help taxpayers recoup some of their multibillion-dollar investment in the Detroit auto companies. Steven Rattner, in a speech sponsored by the Brookings Institution, said his autos team was stunned by the dire straits of GM and Chrysler when they delved into the companies' financial books but was confident the companies could eventually regain profitability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996
Re "Don't Downsize Productivity," by Steven Rattner, Commentary, April 18: As many businesses have downsized or are considering downsizing to stay profitable, the work force suffers. Corporate America squanders the savings from downsizing to pad their wallets and impress their investors. Meanwhile, workers after the downsizing have to work extra hard, extra long, and receive nothing extra! I agree with Rattner's claim that corporate businesses should take better care of their work forces by allowing wage increases to follow productivity growths and investing in retraining workers.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Days before leaving office, New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo settled lawsuits he filed against former Obama administration advisor Steven Rattner. A financier who led the federal bailout and restructuring of General Motors and Chrysler, Rattner agreed to pay $10 million to end the civil litigation. The suits accused him of paying more than $1 million in kickbacks to help his former firm, Quadrangle Group, win contracts to manage $150 million in assets in a state pension fund. Rattner was one of several investment managers accused of improperly securing business from the fund.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Critics of Lawrence H. Summers, one of the leading candidates to be the next Federal Reserve chairman, point to his reputation for being difficult to work with.  But a former Obama administration economic aide who worked for Summers at the White House said he enjoyed the experience. Steven Rattner, a former investment banker who headed President Obama's auto task force in 2009, said in a New York Times opinion article Monday that although he had known Summers for years, he wasn't sure what it would be like to work with him. "Larry's vivid and sometimes strong personality has been well chronicled.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Days before leaving office, New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo settled lawsuits he filed against former Obama administration advisor Steven Rattner. A financier who led the federal bailout and restructuring of General Motors and Chrysler, Rattner agreed to pay $10 million to end the civil litigation. The suits accused him of paying more than $1 million in kickbacks to help his former firm, Quadrangle Group, win contracts to manage $150 million in assets in a state pension fund. Rattner was one of several investment managers accused of improperly securing business from the fund.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Steven Rattner, who engineered the government's bailout of the auto industry, was sued by New York state in a pension kickback case just as he settled similar federal allegations. Two lawsuits filed Thursday by New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo accuse Rattner of paying state officials to steer investment work to his former private equity firm, Quadrangle Group. The suits seek to permanently bar Rattner from the securities industry and to force him to pay at least $26 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2010
Overhaul: An Insider's Account of the Obama Administration's Emergency Rescue of the Auto Industry. Steven Rattner Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 336 pps., $27
NATIONAL
September 23, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
David Axelrod, a top advisor to President Obama and the main architect of his election victory in 2008, will leave the White House next year and return to Chicago to work on the president's reelection campaign, a White House aide said Thursday. Axelrod has not specified a departure date, but he plans to remain in his current position "well into 2011," the aide said. Axelrod, who calls himself a "Chicagoan on assignment," has long made it clear that he misses his hometown and will return before the end of Obama's four-year term.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman
It's a test of Camelot in a way, a question of whether the Kennedys -- who have held sway over Massachusetts politics and the national imagination since the rise of President Kennedy and his glamorous wife, Jackie -- still have coattails. Led by Victoria Kennedy, the widow of Massachusetts Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, the clan on Thursday gave its endorsement in the fight to replace the longtime lawmaker to state Atty. Gen. Martha Coakley, whose race against Republican state Sen. Scott Brown has narrowed in the last few days.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2009 | Peter Whoriskey, Whoriskey writes for the Washington Post.
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- Chrysler, the U.S. automaker that has come closer to annihilation than any of its rivals, rolled out its new five-year business plan Wednesday, saying it intends to become "a great public company once again." Now managed by and partly owned by Fiat, the Italian automaker, Chrysler desperately needs new cars to build its laggard sales, according to a number of analysts. So far this year, its sales are down nearly 40%. "The top priority is to invest to create a compelling brand and product offering," C. Robert Kidder, Chrysler's board chairman, said in remarks prepared for a six-hour presentation to industry analysts and reporters.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2009 | Peter Whoriskey, Whoriskey writes for the Washington Post.
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- Chrysler, the U.S. automaker that has come closer to annihilation than any of its rivals, rolled out its new five-year business plan Wednesday, saying it intends to become "a great public company once again." Now managed by and partly owned by Fiat, the Italian automaker, Chrysler desperately needs new cars to build its laggard sales, according to a number of analysts. So far this year, its sales are down nearly 40%. "The top priority is to invest to create a compelling brand and product offering," C. Robert Kidder, Chrysler's board chairman, said in remarks prepared for a six-hour presentation to industry analysts and reporters.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The former head of the Obama administration's auto task force expressed optimism that General Motors and Chrysler would rebound and help taxpayers recoup some of their multibillion-dollar investment in the Detroit auto companies. Steven Rattner, in a speech sponsored by the Brookings Institution, said his autos team was stunned by the dire straits of GM and Chrysler when they delved into the companies' financial books but was confident the companies could eventually regain profitability.
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