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Steven Rosenberg

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NEWS
July 29, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan said in an interview released Sunday that he is now "someone who does not have cancer" and will not let fear of the disease affect his life, although the recent removal of a malignant tumor from his colon leaves him vulnerable "like everyone else." The interview, with Hugh Sidey of Time magazine, was the first since the President underwent cancer surgery on July 13. Sidey interviewed Reagan on Thursday.
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BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
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NEWS
March 30, 1988 | From Reuters
The chief surgeon at the National Cancer Institute disclosed Tuesday a promising new treatment for cancer that uses potent "killer" cells mixed with a growth element called interleukin-2. Dr. Steven Rosenberg, who gained fame by treating President Reagan for colon cancer, surprised a televised "cancer summit" between American and Soviet specialists by revealing the still-unpublished results of new trials on patients with incurable melanoma, a form of skin cancer.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | From Reuters
The chief surgeon at the National Cancer Institute disclosed Tuesday a promising new treatment for cancer that uses potent "killer" cells mixed with a growth element called interleukin-2. Dr. Steven Rosenberg, who gained fame by treating President Reagan for colon cancer, surprised a televised "cancer summit" between American and Soviet specialists by revealing the still-unpublished results of new trials on patients with incurable melanoma, a form of skin cancer.
BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
NEWS
May 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Billy Carter, brother of former President Jimmy Carter, on Monday entered the National Cancer Institute for experimental treatment of his pancreatic cancer. Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of surgery, said that Carter, 51, would be in the hospital about three weeks.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Two patients suffering from a deadly type of skin cancer today underwent the first attempt to use gene therapy to fight cancer, federal researchers said. In what could usher in a new era in cancer treatment, a 29-year-old woman and a 49-year-old man stricken with advanced melanoma underwent the therapy at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. A team of surgeons led by Dr.
REAL ESTATE
August 13, 1989
The first phase of 123-unit Loma Linda Village, composed of 40 two- and three-bedroom houses priced from $104,990 to $129,990, opens this weekend at Coulston and Ferree streets, adjacent to both Loma Linda and Redlands in San Bernardino County. Developed by Randall Properties of Redlands, NSB Associates of Los Angeles and KMK Real Corp., Marina del Rey, Loma Linda Village has single-family houses with three one- and two-story plans ranging from 1,117 to 1,578 square feet.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | United Press International
A government scientist Monday unveiled a new gene therapy strategy to combat cancer, an approach aimed at "immunizing" cancer patients against their tumors. Dr. Steven Rosenberg of the National Cancer Institute said he hoped to begin testing the innovative tactic on people suffering from incurable cancer within six months.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1987 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times staff writer
Paramount Pictures and Home Box Office on Wednesday signed a multi-year licensing deal that gives HBO exclusive pay-television rights to 85 new Paramount motion pictures, beginning with films released theatrically in May, 1988. Paramount, a Gulf & Western subsidiary, also said it had entered into an agreement with HBO, a Time Inc. subsidiary, to finance jointly an unspecified number of original, made-for-pay-television movies.
NEWS
July 29, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan said in an interview released Sunday that he is now "someone who does not have cancer" and will not let fear of the disease affect his life, although the recent removal of a malignant tumor from his colon leaves him vulnerable "like everyone else." The interview, with Hugh Sidey of Time magazine, was the first since the President underwent cancer surgery on July 13. Sidey interviewed Reagan on Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988
A $200,000 award for pioneering work in cancer therapy will be presented to Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, chief of the surgical branch of the National Cancer Institute, it was announced by the Hammer Prize Foundation. Dr. Armand Hammer, who is chairman of the President's Cancer Panel, will give the special Hammer Cancer Prize for Adoptive Immunotherapy to Rosenberg at a luncheon Tuesday at the Westwood headquarters of Occidental Petroleum Corp.
NEWS
July 20, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
When Dr. Steven Rosenberg earlier this week announced the results of the pathology report from President Reagan's colon surgery, he declared: "The President has cancer." A subsequent statement that, as far as doctors can tell, Reagan's cancer had not spread--has raised questions about why he used the present tense, "has cancer," rather than "had."
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