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Steven Shafer

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NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
The prosecution's star witness, Dr. Steven Shafer, will continue his testimony Thursday in what is expected to be the final day of its involuntary manslaughter case against Michael Jackson's personal physician. Shafer, an expert on propofol - - the drug that killed Jackson -- testified that the pop star would still be alive today if he had an appropriate doctor-patient relationship with Dr. Conrad Murray. During testimony on Wednesday, Shafer described Murray's treatment of Jackson as "pharmacological never, never land.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Testimony drew to a close in the involuntary manslaughter trial of Michael Jackson's personal physician Tuesday as the doctor announced he will not testify in his own defense. Dr. Conrad Murray waited until the last possible moment to declare his intention not to take the stand, telling the judge as late as Monday afternoon he had yet to make up his mind. After the final defense witness completed his testimony Tuesday, Murray took his time responding to the judge's question about his final decision.
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NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Dr. Conrad Murray probably gave Michael Jackson 40 times more of the surgical anesthetic than he admitted to police, and left the drug running into the singer's veins even as his heart stopped beating, a leading expert on the drug testified Thursday. The testimony of anesthesiologist Steven Shafer is the most direct refutation yet of Murray's account of what happened in the hours leading up to his famous patient's death. Shafer, a Columbia University professor, said mathematical modeling based on levels of the drug found posthumously in Jackson's body debunked Murray's statement that he gave only a single 25-milligram dose of the drug shortly before Jackson's death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
A leading anesthesiologist told jurors Friday in the trial of Michael Jackson's personal physician that the singer probably caused his own death by injecting himself with a dose of the drug while his doctor wasn't looking. In his testimony, defense expert Paul White directly challenged the theory put forth by the government's main medical witness, Dr. Steven Shafer. The prosecution expert testified that the only plausible scenario was that Dr. Conrad Murray had left a large intravenous drip of the anesthetic propofol running into the singer's bloodstream for three hours, even after Jackson had stopped breathing.
OPINION
October 15, 2011
In coverage of the first week of the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray, Michael Jackson's personal physician, Times articles consistently described propofol as a "dangerous" anesthetic. Jackson died in June 2009 from the effects of propofol, which Murray says he gave the singer nightly over two months to get him to sleep. The doctor is accused of involuntary manslaughter. Reader Jim Gould of Burbank took issue with the description of the anesthetic: "The Times' repeated, erroneous description of the excellent, safe general anesthetic agent, propofol, as 'dangerous' should be of some concern to the thousands of anesthesia practitioners who correctly use the drug as an anesthetic agent of choice in a wide range of surgical procedures every day. "The Times should carefully avoid their error in the many continuing articles expected on the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
As their case against Michael Jackson's physician neared its end, prosecutors called to the stand medical experts who told jurors of the dangers of the potent surgical anesthetic used by Dr. Conrad Murray to get his famous patient to sleep. Jurors on Thursday heard from the prosecution's final witness in Murray's involuntary manslaughter trial, Dr. Steven Shafer, a leading expert on the anesthetic propofol who devised the dosing guidelines for the drug when it was first introduced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
A leading anesthesiologist told jurors Friday in the trial of Michael Jackson's personal physician that the singer probably caused his own death by injecting himself with a dose of the drug while his doctor wasn't looking. In his testimony, defense expert Paul White directly challenged the theory put forth by the government's main medical witness, Dr. Steven Shafer. The prosecution expert testified that the only plausible scenario was that Dr. Conrad Murray had left a large intravenous drip of the anesthetic propofol running into the singer's bloodstream for three hours, even after Jackson had stopped breathing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2011 | By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
The star medical expert for Michael Jackson's physician began his testimony Thursday with the acknowledgment that not even he could explain the doctor's treatment of the pop star. "Let's deal with the elephant in the room here," a defense attorney said to Dr. Paul White, the most important and probably final witness for the physician. "Conrad Murray has been accused of infusing a dose of propofol and leaving his patient. Can you justify that?" "Absolutely not," White replied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Testimony drew to a close in the involuntary manslaughter trial of Michael Jackson's personal physician Tuesday as the doctor announced he will not testify in his own defense. Dr. Conrad Murray waited until the last possible moment to declare his intention not to take the stand, telling the judge as late as Monday afternoon he had yet to make up his mind. After the final defense witness completed his testimony Tuesday, Murray took his time responding to the judge's question about his final decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Michael Jackson's personal physician probably gave his patient 40 times more surgical anesthetic than he admitted to police, a drug expert testified Thursday. Anesthesiologist Steven Shafer also said Dr. Conrad Murray had the drug flowing into the singer's veins even as his heart stopped beating. The testimony is the most direct refutation yet of Murray's account of what happened in the hours leading up to the pop star's death. FULL COVERAGE: The Conrad Murray trial Shafer, a Columbia University professor, said mathematical modeling based on levels of propofol found in Jackson's body debunked Murray's statement that he had given the singer a single 25-milligram dose of the drug shortly before his death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2011 | By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
The star medical expert for Michael Jackson's physician began his testimony Thursday with the acknowledgment that not even he could explain the doctor's treatment of the pop star. "Let's deal with the elephant in the room here," a defense attorney said to Dr. Paul White, the most important and probably final witness for the physician. "Conrad Murray has been accused of infusing a dose of propofol and leaving his patient. Can you justify that?" "Absolutely not," White replied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Michael Jackson's personal physician probably gave his patient 40 times more surgical anesthetic than he admitted to police, a drug expert testified Thursday. Anesthesiologist Steven Shafer also said Dr. Conrad Murray had the drug flowing into the singer's veins even as his heart stopped beating. The testimony is the most direct refutation yet of Murray's account of what happened in the hours leading up to the pop star's death. FULL COVERAGE: The Conrad Murray trial Shafer, a Columbia University professor, said mathematical modeling based on levels of propofol found in Jackson's body debunked Murray's statement that he had given the singer a single 25-milligram dose of the drug shortly before his death.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Dr. Conrad Murray probably gave Michael Jackson 40 times more of the surgical anesthetic than he admitted to police, and left the drug running into the singer's veins even as his heart stopped beating, a leading expert on the drug testified Thursday. The testimony of anesthesiologist Steven Shafer is the most direct refutation yet of Murray's account of what happened in the hours leading up to his famous patient's death. Shafer, a Columbia University professor, said mathematical modeling based on levels of the drug found posthumously in Jackson's body debunked Murray's statement that he gave only a single 25-milligram dose of the drug shortly before Jackson's death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2011 | By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
If Michael Jackson's doctor had acted more like a medical professional and less like a domestic, the singer would be alive today, a prosecution expert testified Wednesday at the physician's trial. The witness, an anesthesiologist who specializes in the drug that killed Jackson, told jurors that an improper "employer-employee" relationship between the singer and Dr. Conrad Murray, who was paid $150,000 a month, directly led to the singer's fatal overdose. "Dr. Murray should have said, 'Michael Jackson, I am not giving you propofol.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
The prosecution's star witness, Dr. Steven Shafer, will continue his testimony Thursday in what is expected to be the final day of its involuntary manslaughter case against Michael Jackson's personal physician. Shafer, an expert on propofol - - the drug that killed Jackson -- testified that the pop star would still be alive today if he had an appropriate doctor-patient relationship with Dr. Conrad Murray. During testimony on Wednesday, Shafer described Murray's treatment of Jackson as "pharmacological never, never land.
OPINION
October 15, 2011
In coverage of the first week of the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray, Michael Jackson's personal physician, Times articles consistently described propofol as a "dangerous" anesthetic. Jackson died in June 2009 from the effects of propofol, which Murray says he gave the singer nightly over two months to get him to sleep. The doctor is accused of involuntary manslaughter. Reader Jim Gould of Burbank took issue with the description of the anesthetic: "The Times' repeated, erroneous description of the excellent, safe general anesthetic agent, propofol, as 'dangerous' should be of some concern to the thousands of anesthesia practitioners who correctly use the drug as an anesthetic agent of choice in a wide range of surgical procedures every day. "The Times should carefully avoid their error in the many continuing articles expected on the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2011 | By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
If Michael Jackson's doctor had acted more like a medical professional and less like a domestic, the singer would be alive today, a prosecution expert testified Wednesday at the physician's trial. The witness, an anesthesiologist who specializes in the drug that killed Jackson, told jurors that an improper "employer-employee" relationship between the singer and Dr. Conrad Murray, who was paid $150,000 a month, directly led to the singer's fatal overdose. "Dr. Murray should have said, 'Michael Jackson, I am not giving you propofol.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1986
Steven Shafer was appointed vice president-sales of Los Angeles Cellular Telephone Co., City of Commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
As their case against Michael Jackson's physician neared its end, prosecutors called to the stand medical experts who told jurors of the dangers of the potent surgical anesthetic used by Dr. Conrad Murray to get his famous patient to sleep. Jurors on Thursday heard from the prosecution's final witness in Murray's involuntary manslaughter trial, Dr. Steven Shafer, a leading expert on the anesthetic propofol who devised the dosing guidelines for the drug when it was first introduced.
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