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Steven Soderbergh

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
The exclamation point at the end of "The Informant!" gives it all away. While the title may promise a straight-ahead drama, that bit of faux-jaunty emphasis shows that nothing of the sort is going on. Which is business as usual these days when Steven Soderbergh is the director. Soderbergh, who won an Oscar for directing "Traffic" and was nominated for "Erin Brockovich" in the same year, is a filmmaker as exasperating as he is gifted. And not just when he forsakes calculated crowd pleasers like "Ocean's Eleven" for doodles like "Bubble."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By John Horn
NEW YORK - As parents of young girls and as two of Hollywood's most prolific producers, Kathy Kennedy and Frank Marshall believed that "Columbine," journalist Dave Cullen's exhaustive investigation of the 1999 school massacre, contained compelling and often untold stories that needed to be shared with a larger audience. So when the book was published five years ago, the producers of "Lincoln" and "The Bourne Identity" purchased its rights, hoping to turn "Columbine" into a feature directed by "The Social Network's" David Fincher.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
HBO's Liberace biopic "Behind the Candelabra" has generated so much buzz thanks to its subject matter (the tormented relationship between the pianist and his much younger lover, Scott Thorson) and its well-known leading men (Michael Douglas and Matt Damon), it's easy to forget it also happens to be the last film directed by Steven Soderbergh before he goes into self-imposed exile from moviemaking. Twenty-four years after his low-budget drama "Sex, Lies, and Videotape" took Cannes by storm and helped usher in a new age in independent cinema, Soderbergh, 50, is done with the medium - at least for now. "The phone's not ringing as often, which is fine," said the (former?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By David Ng
Steven Soderbergh made his New York debut as a stage director on Tuesday with the official opening of "The Library," a school-shooting drama starring Chloe Grace Moretz, at the Public Theater in New York. Penned by frequent Soderbergh collaborator Scott Z. Burns, "The Library" had been in previews since March 25. The play is scheduled to run at the Public through April 27. Moretz plays a student who survives a deadly shooting at her high school and then struggles to tell her story to her parents and the authorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By David Ng
For someone who has retired from his main gig of directing movies, Steven Soderbergh has been keeping a busy schedule. In addition to working on the new cable mini-series "The Knick" and publishing a novel in tweet form, Soderbergh will direct a new play starring Chloe Grace Moretz that will open at New York's Public Theater in April. "The Library," penned by frequent Soderbergh collaborator Scott Z. Burns, will start performances at the Public on March 25 and will have an official opening on April 15. The world premiere at the Public is scheduled to run through April 27. Moretz will play a student who survives a deadly shooting at her high school and then struggles to tell her story to her parents and the authorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
I've long been of the opinion that Steven Soderbergh's imminent "retirement" has all the conviction and permanence of a Brett Favre pronouncement. But assuming the "Magic Mike" helmer means it when he says that he wants to call it a career after two more films (recently shot pharma-thriller The Bitter Pill" and  upcoming Liberace biopic "Behind the Candelabra") to concentrate on, um, painting -- and he may or may not actually mean it -- this past weekend offers some pretty good evidence for why he shouldn't retire.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Steven Soderbergh - who's indicated, not for the first time, that he's tired of filmmaking and may retire - has had a most unusual career. His persistent ennui has led him to all manner of narrative experiments, benighted projects like "Schizopolis" and "The Good German" that were doubtless more involving for him to make than for audiences to experience. But, as successes like "Erin Brockovich," "Out of Sight" and his new film, "Side Effects," demonstrate, when Soderbergh is willing to play it on the square, he's as good as anyone at bringing intelligence and verve to straight-ahead material.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Steven Soderbergh's new movie is called "Bubble," which would suggest that somebody -- the characters, the audiences, the filmmakers -- is supposed to be hovering above cold, hard reality in a fragile membrane of some kind. Nothing in the lives depicted on the screen reflects the effervescence of the title, though, and the director stares at his protagonists with such austere, Bressonian intensity it starts to feel impolite after a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2002 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
Having James Cameron and Steven Soderbergh at the same table, doing a joint interview about their new movie, is sort of like watching Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant in a Venice Beach pickup game together -- two pros having some fun at a game they take very seriously. The King of the World jokes about his five marriages and his self-taught movie education, saying "most of what I learned about film was at a drive-in. It was a long time before I heard a film in stereo."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2001 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a regular contributor to Calendar
When the new movie "Traffic" was being previewed at test screenings last fall, its director, Steven Soderbergh, took note of how much time audiences were spending filling out their report cards afterward and the emotion they brought to the focus groups discussing the film. Something was different, thought the director of such films as "Erin Brockovich," "Out of Sight" and "sex, lies and videotape." "It was like they'd been waiting for someone to ask them about this issue," Soderbergh says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By David Ng
For someone who has retired from his main gig of directing movies, Steven Soderbergh has been keeping a busy schedule. In addition to working on the new cable mini-series "The Knick" and publishing a novel in tweet form, Soderbergh will direct a new play starring Chloe Grace Moretz that will open at New York's Public Theater in April. "The Library," penned by frequent Soderbergh collaborator Scott Z. Burns, will start performances at the Public on March 25 and will have an official opening on April 15. The world premiere at the Public is scheduled to run through April 27. Moretz will play a student who survives a deadly shooting at her high school and then struggles to tell her story to her parents and the authorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Steven Soderbergh, hot off the success of his HBO movie, "Behind the Candelabra," is returning to TV again, this time to direct all 10 episodes of a new Cinemax series called "The Knick. " Starring Clive Owen, "The Knick" is set in the Knickbocker Hospital in New York City, circa 1900. It tells the story of the doctors, nurses and staff who did their best to advance medicine in a time where medical standards were far, far more primitive than they would be just three decades later.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
At 58, Jeff Daniels has made more than 40 movies, been nominated for three film Golden Globes and had one of the defining big-screen comedies of the 1990s ("Dumb & Dumber"). But before last year he had never been a TV-series regular - and had never been nominated for an Emmy Award. That changed Thursday, when the actor scored a lead actor in a drama nomination for his portrayal of anchor Will McAvoy on HBO's fictional cable-journalism series "The Newsroom. " Daniels leads a pack of film performers who have caught the television academy's eye with their move to the small screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
TV is the new black for film gentry. Once regarded as a purgatory for serious actors and producers, television has been attracting top-tier movie talent on both sides of the camera for years thanks in no small part to the deep character studies encouraged by cable networks. And this year's Primetime Emmy nominations, which roll out early Thursday morning, may underscore the point as never before. Film stars Kevin Spacey, Jane Fonda, Jeff Daniels, Shirley MacLaine, Holly Hunter, Al Pacino, Helen Mirren, Michael Douglas, Matt Damon and Kevin Bacon, as well as respected filmmakers David Fincher, Steven Soderbergh and Jane Campion are just some of the cinema-tilted talent in line to get the early morning wake-up call late this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
In 2000, the oddball idea crashed into Michael Douglas' self-regard like a thundering piano glissando. Between takes on "Traffic," the ensemble narco drama the actor was at work on then, Oscar-winning director Steven Soderbergh came to Douglas to pitch the idea of him playing one of the 20th century's most flamboyant, fabulously magniloquent showmen in a future film. "Steven gave me that pensive 'looking right through me' expression when I was portraying the drug czar, a pretty buttoned-up guy, to say, 'Have you ever thought about portraying Liberace?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
"Behind the Candelabra," the Liberace biopic starring Michael Douglas and Matt Damon, garnered 2.4 million viewers in its premiere Sunday on HBO. The Steven Soderbergh-directed television movie was a huge hit for the cable network -- giving it its best audience since the 2004 movie "Something the Lord Made. " Soderbergh has been quite candid about the film's long road to the small screen; it originally was intended as a feature film, but those plans fell apart when Warner Bros. lost interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a frequent contributor to The Times. and
If you were Steven Soderbergh, what would you do? Your first movie, "sex, lies, and videotape," becomes a massive commercial and critical hit after coming from nowhere to win two major prizes at the Cannes Film Festival of 1989. You bring the movie in for a paltry $1.2 million; it goes on to recoup its costs several times over. You are just 26 years old. Now two of America's best-known filmmakers, Robert Redford and Sydney Pollack, are knocking at your door.
MAGAZINE
February 16, 1997 | SCOTT COLLINS, Scott Collins is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Until the age of 12, Steven Soderbergh's consuming passion was baseball. As a Little League player, he had terrific across-the-board skills, racking up a 7- 0 pitching record, including a no-hitter, and a .450 batting average by midseason of 1975. He thought he had a shot at the major leagues, a dream his father, who attended every game, did not discourage. But one day that summer, he stopped being good. * "I went out and pitched and got my head taken off. I couldn't hit," he remembers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
HBO's Liberace biopic "Behind the Candelabra" has generated so much buzz thanks to its subject matter (the tormented relationship between the pianist and his much younger lover, Scott Thorson) and its well-known leading men (Michael Douglas and Matt Damon), it's easy to forget it also happens to be the last film directed by Steven Soderbergh before he goes into self-imposed exile from moviemaking. Twenty-four years after his low-budget drama "Sex, Lies, and Videotape" took Cannes by storm and helped usher in a new age in independent cinema, Soderbergh, 50, is done with the medium - at least for now. "The phone's not ringing as often, which is fine," said the (former?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Steven Soderbergh's "Behind the Candelabra" was preceded by so much fuss over the casting of Michael Douglas as bedazzled pianist icon Liberace and Matt Damon as the entertainer's young lover Scott Thorson, that you'd have thought the duo did something other than act for a living. Yes, biopics are hard, and Liberace was quite a character. That elfin face and sweet whine of a voice appear so at odds with his carefully controlled career. And certainly not every actor can convincingly rock sequined pants and an ermine cape.
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