Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteven Spielberg S
IN THE NEWS

Steven Spielberg S

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan" has stormed through its first week in German theaters to become one of the biggest films of the year, but viewers and reviewers alike attribute its success more to the director's reputation than groundbreaking reflection on Germany's role in the war.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan" has stormed through its first week in German theaters to become one of the biggest films of the year, but viewers and reviewers alike attribute its success more to the director's reputation than groundbreaking reflection on Germany's role in the war.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
While cutting “Silver Linings Playbook” with editor Jay Cassidy, director David O. Russell was watching the scene in which Bradley Cooper's bipolar protagonist Pat Solitano melts down in his parents' attic looking for a copy of his wedding video. The frantic search had been triggered by a highly charged first evening with Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), a woman, Pat subconsciously realizes, who might derail him from his manic mission to reunite with his estranged wife. Russell wanted to marry the dialogue and visuals to a piece of music, heightening its cinematic appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988
I have often wondered what really goes through their minds when a star is asked, "What does an Oscar mean to you?" Although many stories exist about how the term Oscar was coined, none of them implies that its initials stand for anything. I wonder. To me, OSCAR means: Outstanding Stars Collecting Annual Rewards. Some suggestions as to what others might think are: Obviously Shan't Come And Receive (George C. Scott) Others Shall Come And Receive (Marlon Brando)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
The title of “Abraham Lincoln in Two Miles a Penny” refers to the legendary account of the 16th president of the United States walking six miles to return a three-cent overcharge to a customer. Writer-performer Ed Trotta's acclaimed one-man show about the Great Emancipator plies its modest wares to fairly engaging effect. After an aural prologue of historical events ending with a gun shot, Trotta enters from the lobby, looking eerily like Lincoln. His jovial greeting makes it immediately clear that this particular dead president knows the score: “I never thought I'd set foot in a theater again.” It turns out that Lincoln has received a dispensation “from belonging to the ages” to address 21st century audiences, primarily to dispel his “legend,” which “is sticking in my craw.” Opening at the Lincoln Memorial, Trotta's text merges biographical overview and self-assessment with the celebrated wit. Much of the material is familiar  -- self-educated lawyer,  his courtship of Mary Todd, the Cabinet of political rivals, Gettysburg, and so forth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By John Horn
The Broadcast Film Critics Assn. awards are a far cry from the Oscars and scarcely more legitimate than the Golden Globes, but Ben Affleck was clearly stunned and touched when the BFCA handed the “Argo” filmmaker its directing prize the same day that the actor-filmmaker was shut out of the same category for this year's Academy Awards. “I would like to thank the Academy,” Affleck joked in accepting the Critics' Choice trophy Thursday night, hours after he was surprisingly snubbed by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in the directors race for the 85th annual Oscars.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Scott Sandell
The Golden Globes nominations, hot on the heels of the Screen Actors Guild nominations, are set to take place Thursday morning at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Will the Globe nominations be a replay of Wednesday's nods, which saw Steven Spielberg's historical biography “Lincoln,” the musical epic “Les Miserables” and the quirky romantic comedy “Silver Linings Playbook” dominate the SAGs? Will "Zero Dark Thirty" get one after failing to grab an ensemble cast nom at the SAGs?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
DreamWorks Studios has begun filming the “The Fifth Estate,” a movie about the controversial founder of WikiLeaks. The film, which will be released in the U.S. on Nov. 15 through Disney's Touchstone label, began principal photography last week in Iceland and is filming this week in Berlin. The film also will shoot in Belgium, where it will receive a tax credit. Directed by Bill Condon, "The Fifth Estate" stars Benedict Cumberbatch as Julian Assange and Daniel Brühl as Daniel Domscheit-Berg, as well as Laura Linney, Anthony Mackie and David Thewlis.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By John Horn
The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. gravitates toward particular kinds of movies, and clearly the Golden Globe voters found that “Beasts of the Southern Wild” wasn't in that realm. Considered by many award prognosticators a leading contender for a best picture Oscar and a best actress Oscar for young star Quvenzhané Wallis, “Beasts of the Southern Wild” was completely blanked Thursday morning in nominations for the 70 th annual Golden Globes, in which Steven Spielberg's “Lincoln” led all nominees with seven picks.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2014 | By Steve Padilla
As one online commentator put it, "This is like discovering a UFO for gaming. " The writer was referring to the dusty scene captured in a YouTube video shot in the New Mexico desert, where makers of a film documentary began digging in a landfill in search of "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial," a failed Atari video game made more than a generation ago. "E.T. " was a great film, but the game was a bomb, flop, fiasco. On the bright side, its complete failure did produce a video game urban legend on a par with more mainstream legends like Bigfoot and the Jersey Devil.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By John Horn
It may not be sensible to look a gift horse in the mouth, but the makers of “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Argo” certainly must have mixed feelings about  the nominations for the 85th annual Academy Awards. Kathryn Bigelow's account of the hunt for Osama bin Laden and Ben Affleck's tale of the rescue of six Americans trapped in Iran were nominated for best picture Thursday morning, but neither Bigelow nor Affleck - both considered locks in the category - were selected for best director.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|